[SOLVED] Slow Connection to Office's VPN

Sep 29, 2021
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Good morning,
I recently moved to Rio de Janeiro and i'm having a slow connection to my NY office's VPN. I connect to the office network's drive to work on projects and it was excellent with my verizon gigabit connection when I lived in New York. Now in Brazil I had a 100/30mbit internet and it reduces to 1/8mbit when connected to the VPN. I had the internet company upgrade my internet and now its 950/80mbit, but the connection speed to my office is unchanged. I had the internet company change the router and its unchanged. The guy responsible for the office's VPN doesn't have a solution for me. Am I SOL because of the distance between brazil and nyc? Thanks for the help.
 
First I would run a speed test and select various servers in new york. This should show you if there is some issue because of path you data takes. The end connection speed to your house and your router have no affect on which ISP and which undersea fibers your data takes to get to a remote location.

This is only partially useful. You would somehow need to find a speedtest server that used the same ISP as your NY office location. What you will likely find is some servers in the same city work good and other do not. I guess that is better than if none of them run fast.

The pure distance is not so much a limitation anymore but it depends on the application. If you look at old style telent every single letter you type would have to go all the way to the end and get confirmed before you could send the next. So if you were on satellite where the ping time was 500ms you could only get 2 letters a second.
With more modern networks things like large file transfers use tricks to get past this limit but if you were to say run a database that does huge numbers of tiny updates you would still be affected by the latency.

I assume you were using the same vpn software before you moved. VPN software has a lot of overhead so it can cause issues but if it worked before then it is not the vpn itself.

This is one of those things that the problem is likely outside your house and you can't really fix it. The only real thing you have control over is which ISP you use. Maybe a different ISP has different connectivity and a different path. For most people this is not a option. If you use a laptop maybe try a internet cafe and see
if any work better just as a test

The variation on this is to use a VPN service. This is very hit and miss. You would hope to find a vpn service that has a data center someplace that then has good connectivity to your office in new york. You can run your office vpn though a second vpn but it can be messy to setup. The simplest way would be to run one vpn on the router and the second on your end device.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: isquaredr
First I would run a speed test and select various servers in new york. This should show you if there is some issue because of path you data takes. The end connection speed to your house and your router have no affect on which ISP and which undersea fibers your data takes to get to a remote location.

This is only partially useful. You would somehow need to find a speedtest server that used the same ISP as your NY office location. What you will likely find is some servers in the same city work good and other do not. I guess that is better than if none of them run fast.

The pure distance is not so much a limitation anymore but it depends on the application. If you look at old style telent every single letter you type would have to go all the way to the end and get confirmed before you could send the next. So if you were on satellite where the ping time was 500ms you could only get 2 letters a second.
With more modern networks things like large file transfers use tricks to get past this limit but if you were to say run a database that does huge numbers of tiny updates you would still be affected by the latency.

I assume you were using the same vpn software before you moved. VPN software has a lot of overhead so it can cause issues but if it worked before then it is not the vpn itself.

This is one of those things that the problem is likely outside your house and you can't really fix it. The only real thing you have control over is which ISP you use. Maybe a different ISP has different connectivity and a different path. For most people this is not a option. If you use a laptop maybe try a internet cafe and see
if any work better just as a test

The variation on this is to use a VPN service. This is very hit and miss. You would hope to find a vpn service that has a data center someplace that then has good connectivity to your office in new york. You can run your office vpn though a second vpn but it can be messy to setup. The simplest way would be to run one vpn on the router and the second on your end device.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: isquaredr

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