[SOLVED] Slow shut down & restart after motherboard swap

Bellaflica

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Hey all, not too long ago I updated my PC and changed out my motherboard from an Asus Maximus VI Hero to a Gigabyte Aorus x570 Elite. I have a 5800x + a 3060. Ever since then, my computer takes 5 minutes or more to fully shut down.. Windows DOES seem to turn off, as my display loses signal, but my PC takes forever to kill the power. Windows start-up is still fast as ever.

I am using an old Corsair AX 760, nearing 10 years of normal and regular use. This was not an issue before the motherboard swap & parts upgrade, which is why I think the motherboard is somehow the culprit. It seems like it's not telling the other parts to shut off in time, unless it's the PSU having trouble all of a sudden. I plan on buying a new PSU soon.. but even still I'm not convinced that will fix it.

I've fiddled with several things, but nothing has worked thus far. Might it be an SSD issue somehow? Could migrating my OS to the NVMe potentially solve it?

Thanks for your input. Cheers
 

DSzymborski

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That is exactly when the issue with delay began so I agree that's what caused it. I also haven't been able to update my video card, as of late... I will try a few things and update if I find a solution.
Have you done a fresh install yet? That hasn't stopped being something that should be done nor has it stopped being the most likely solution at this point.
 
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USAFRet

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May we conclude you did NOT do a full OS reinstall with this motherboard swap?

Of my oft mentioned 3 possibilities:

3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.


Migrating to a different drive is not the solution. That just moves the issue to a different drive.
 

Bellaflica

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May we conclude you did NOT do a full OS reinstall with this motherboard swap?

Of my oft mentioned 3 possibilities:

3. It "works", but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.


Migrating to a different drive is not the solution. That just moves the issue to a different drive.
That's right... I see now I really should have. Should that be standard practice every time? I wish I had done it, but I thought it would be okay as is.

I was thinking the drive migration probably wouldn't fix it.. thanks for confirming. Do you know exactly what the issue is? It's an OS-to-Motherboard issue because I didn't reinstall OS with a new motherboard? I can live with it I guess, it's just a bit annoying. Is the drive itself doomed now?
 

USAFRet

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That's right... I see now I really should have. Should that be standard practice every time? I wish I had done it, but I thought it would be okay as is.

I was thinking the drive migration probably wouldn't fix it.. thanks for confirming. Do you know exactly what the issue is? It's an OS-to-Motherboard issue because I didn't reinstall OS with a new motherboard? I can live with it I guess, it's just a bit annoying. Is the drive itself doomed now?
The drive is almost certainly physically fine.

But moving that drive+OS to a whole different system can have many many issues. Some severe, some merely annoying. Sometimes, no boot at all.
Impossible to say what the underlying problem is, apart from not doing that full wipe and reinstall.
 

Bellaflica

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The drive is almost certainly physically fine.

But moving that drive+OS to a whole different system can have many many issues. Some severe, some merely annoying. Sometimes, no boot at all.
Impossible to say what the underlying problem is, apart from not doing that full wipe and reinstall.
I see.

What about removing the OS drive from my current motherboard and pairing it back up again with my old Motherboard & parts? Would that be fine? Maybe even fix it? I was thinking of doing that..

Then I imagine I would I need to format my NVMe drive to do a fresh, clean install of windows on it.
 
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USAFRet

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I see.

What about removing the OS drive from my current motherboard and pairing it back up again with my old Motherboard & parts? Would that be fine? Maybe even fix it? I was thinking of doing that..

Then I imagine I would I need to format my NVMe drive to do a fresh, clean install of windows on it.
If you put it back with the original board, it may work properly.
But there is nothing to "fix".

Once in the new board again, the problem may resurface.
 
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It sounds like you're experiencing an issue with your PC taking a long time to shut down after upgrading your motherboard and other components. There could be a few different causes for this issue, so here are a few things you can try:

Make sure that all your device drivers are up to date. Sometimes, outdated drivers can cause issues with system shutdown.

Check your power settings. Make sure that your PC is set to shut down completely when you press the power button. Some users have found that setting their PC to "Fast Startup" can cause slow shutdowns.

Check your BIOS settings. Some motherboards have settings that control how the system shuts down. Make sure that all your power-related settings are configured correctly.

Check your PSU. As you mentioned, your PSU is nearing 10 years of use and it could be causing issue with the power supply. You may want to consider getting a new power supply as it could be responsible for the slow shut down.

Check for malware or other malware. Sometimes malware can cause issues with system shutdown. Run a full scan with your antivirus software.

Check your SSD. It is possible that your SSD may be causing the issue. If you are still experiencing the issue after trying the above steps, you may want to consider migrating your OS to the NVMe drive.

It's worth noting that all of this troubleshooting steps are suggestions and not a guarantee that it will solve the problem, but it's a good starting point.
 
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USAFRet

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It sounds like you're experiencing an issue with your PC taking a long time to shut down after upgrading your motherboard and other components. There could be a few different causes for this issue, so here are a few things you can try:

Make sure that all your device drivers are up to date. Sometimes, outdated drivers can cause issues with system shutdown.

Check your power settings. Make sure that your PC is set to shut down completely when you press the power button. Some users have found that setting their PC to "Fast Startup" can cause slow shutdowns.

Check your BIOS settings. Some motherboards have settings that control how the system shuts down. Make sure that all your power-related settings are configured correctly.

Check your PSU. As you mentioned, your PSU is nearing 10 years of use and it could be causing issue with the power supply. You may want to consider getting a new power supply as it could be responsible for the slow shut down.

Check for malware or other malware. Sometimes malware can cause issues with system shutdown. Run a full scan with your antivirus software.

Check your SSD. It is possible that your SSD may be causing the issue. If you are still experiencing the issue after trying the above steps, you may want to consider migrating your OS to the NVMe drive.

It's worth noting that all of this troubleshooting steps are suggestions and not a guarantee that it will solve the problem, but it's a good starting point.
And NONE of that speaks to the actual root problem....new motherboard + old OS.
 
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Bellaflica

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And NONE of that speaks to the actual root problem....new motherboard + old OS.
That is exactly when the issue with delay began so I agree that's what caused it. I also haven't been able to update my video card, as of late... I will try a few things and update if I find a solution.
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

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That is exactly when the issue with delay began so I agree that's what caused it. I also haven't been able to update my video card, as of late... I will try a few things and update if I find a solution.
Have you done a fresh install yet? That hasn't stopped being something that should be done nor has it stopped being the most likely solution at this point.
 
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Bellaflica

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Have you done a fresh install yet? That hasn't stopped being something that should be done nor has it stopped being the most likely solution at this point.
Oh. No... lol.

Yeah.. I guess I should try that, first. For some reason I thought it was too late now. Thanks :)

Thing is... I've never done it before and I haven't really backed anything up. Any tips? Where should I back up my data? OneDrive? Or should I simply transfer key data and wipe the rest?
 

DSzymborski

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OneDrive is useful for important files. You should definitely always have a backup. Long-term, a second drive and/or a cloud backup to do automated, regular backups of important files is necessary. For any files that aren't properly backed up, the question becomes when you'll lose those files not if.

Yes, a full wipe and backup can be done at any time. As long as you have unresolved odd issues, the need continues to exist to eliminate that as a source of problems. There's a reason a full wipe-and-reinstall is best practice.
 
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DSzymborski

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I see. Point taken. I'll try to get into the habit of doing it.

Do I need to wipe all of my drives, or just the drive carrying my OS?
Just the OS drive.

Though make sure to have only the OS drive connected when you reinstall. Windows has an obnoxious tendency of putting some boot stuff in secondary drives.

Once you have a full, fresh install of Windows, we can then re-evaluate whether you're still having issues and move onto the next possibility. Diagnosing PC problems is basically eliminated likely sources of problems one by one. if it's something else, well, you now have a nice fresh Windows install when we figure out what the cause of this particular problem is.
 
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Bellaflica

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Just the OS drive.

Though make sure to have only the OS drive connected when you reinstall. Windows has an obnoxious tendency of putting some boot stuff in secondary drives.

Once you have a full, fresh install of Windows, we can then re-evaluate whether you're still having issues and move onto the next possibility. Diagnosing PC problems is basically eliminated likely sources of problems one by one. if it's something else, well, you now have a nice fresh Windows install when we figure out what the cause of this particular problem is.
Perfect! That's good to know. I will definitely do that, thanks.

Right. I think there's a good chance this will help with at least with one or two issues. I'll be busy the next few days, so I'll have to wait until early next week to perform the fresh install of Windows. I'll post an update once I've done it.
 

USAFRet

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Oh. No... lol.

Yeah.. I guess I should try that, first. For some reason I thought it was too late now. Thanks :)

Thing is... I've never done it before and I haven't really backed anything up. Any tips? Where should I back up my data? OneDrive? Or should I simply transfer key data and wipe the rest?
 
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Bellaflica

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Hey guys, so I am in the process of fresh installing Windows but I have run into a little problem.

Windows says it cannot be installed onto the disk as "The selected disk has an MBR partition table. On EFI systems, Windows can only be installed to GPT disks." So I guess I used MBR instead of GPT when I created the partition way back when. If I simply format the disk during Windows Setup, will I then be able to continue with installation? Or would that be bad, and I should use legacy mode to install or try to change the drive to GPT somehow?

Thanks for your help!
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Hey guys, so I am in the process of fresh installing Windows but I have run into a little problem.

Windows says it cannot be installed onto the disk as "The selected disk has an MBR partition table. On EFI systems, Windows can only be installed to GPT disks." So I guess I used MBR instead of GPT when I created the partition way back when. If I simply format the disk during Windows Setup, will I then be able to continue with installation? Or would that be bad, and I should use legacy mode to install or try to change the drive to GPT somehow?

Thanks for your help!
Start over.
Format it as GPT in the process.
 
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Bellaflica

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Start over.
Format it as GPT in the process.
Thanks! I simply deleted the partition and it then allowed me to install. Windows auto-detected the UEFI & used the GPT partition style. Easy!

Great news! It fixed all my issues! 😁 My computer is back to shutting down & restarting at regular speeds. Gosh, it feels so much better, it's so fast again! I was also able to download the latest GPU drivers, which kept freezing mid-installation before. Yay! Thanks for all your guy's help. Valuable lesson learned! Cheers 🙂
 

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