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Question So my PSU exploded...

Jul 10, 2020
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Hi Everyone,

The title kinda says it all. This morning, while booted up and waiting for me to do something with it, my PC decided to nuke itself. Or more accurately, my Corsair TXM 650w gold PSU decided to let out a loud bang, try to make lightning, flip my fuse box and generally ruin my day.

I have no idea why my now 3 month old PC build decided to go out this way and was wondering if someone who wasn't a total PC novice could offer some insight?

My questionable PC specs are(/were):

Motherboard: ASUS Tuf B450M plus gaming

CPU: Ryzen 5 2600x

GPU: MSI Geforce GTX 1660 ti

PSU(Ex): Corsair TXM gold 650w

RAMM: 2x Corsair vengeance 8gb DDR4-3000

CASE: CiT f3 (it was cheap)

FANS: A bunch of nice fans, including an Arctic freezer 34 esports duo. Turns out the 2600x sits at a high idle voltage and needs the extra cooling to not bake itself. Plus there's no such thing as too many fans right?

Of course, I'm worried that my Mobo or GPU might now be fried, but I can't test that until I get my grubby hands on a new PSU.

So the main questions: Any ideas as to what caused the very dramatic explosion of my PSU? Any suggestions as to a make/model for a replacement PSU? Anyone feel like judging my first failed attempt at PC building?

All help greatly appreciated!
 
Jul 10, 2020
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If it is 3 months old you should get a replacement from Corsair, if you ham up your distress at the manner in which the unit failed perhaps they will replace it with a higher tier model
I hadn't even considered they would replace it as I ordered through amazon, but that's reassuring to know as prices have jumped recently. Thanks!

I do worry that something in my system caused it to blow, but practically speaking I can't work out how that would be the case.
 
Something I have found to watch our for with cheap case builds. A lot of times they have very sharp edges inside. Your PSU cables can rub on these edges and cut through insulators. I would check to be sure you don't see a burned place in one of the power connectors and/or along one of the case edges.
 
I hadn't even considered they would replace it as I ordered through amazon, but that's reassuring to know as prices have jumped recently. Thanks!
It has a seven year warranty. It's a manufacturer's warranty. Not Amazon warranty. So of course Corsair would be the one to replace it.

Curious as to what the lot code of the PSU was? Do you have the first 8 digits of the S/N? It's on both the PSU and the box.

Thanks!

I'll also point a customer service rep to this thread.
 

Corsair Nick

Reputable
Jul 5, 2017
32
3
4,565
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Hi Everyone,

The title kinda says it all. This morning, while booted up and waiting for me to do something with it, my PC decided to nuke itself. Or more accurately, my Corsair TXM 650w gold PSU decided to let out a loud bang, try to make lightning, flip my fuse box and generally ruin my day.

I have no idea why my now 3 month old PC build decided to go out this way and was wondering if someone who wasn't a total PC novice could offer some insight?

My questionable PC specs are(/were):

Motherboard: ASUS Tuf B450M plus gaming

CPU: Ryzen 5 2600x

GPU: MSI Geforce GTX 1660 ti

PSU(Ex): Corsair TXM gold 650w

RAMM: 2x Corsair vengeance 8gb DDR4-3000

CASE: CiT f3 (it was cheap)

FANS: A bunch of nice fans, including an Arctic freezer 34 esports duo. Turns out the 2600x sits at a high idle voltage and needs the extra cooling to not bake itself. Plus there's no such thing as too many fans right?

Of course, I'm worried that my Mobo or GPU might now be fried, but I can't test that until I get my grubby hands on a new PSU.

So the main questions: Any ideas as to what caused the very dramatic explosion of my PSU? Any suggestions as to a make/model for a replacement PSU? Anyone feel like judging my first failed attempt at PC building?

All help greatly appreciated!
@Iceni_ we can help get you a replacement since the unit is under warranty through CORSAIR. You'll need to submit a support ticket on our website to start the process. After you've created the ticket, PM me with the ticket number, and I'll reach out to a support agent to help you out.

 
Jul 10, 2020
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It's hard to tell without knowing what happens before the bang. Maybe you have some clue?
I'm honestly so puzzled by the circumstance. Nothing but the fridge-freezer, the wifi router, and the multi-socket for the PC and its peripherals was even plugged in in my apartment. Nothing in the house suggested a power surge. There wasn't even a bad smell, no smoke, no heat to indicate anything awry.

Probably just (bad) luck of the draw. What are the ambient temps like where the computer is located? Has it been excessively warm in your part of the world? Do you have air conditioning?

-Wolf sends
It's a steady 22C (so around 70F I think?) in my office space and its been pretty standard for an English summer. I don't have aircon but I do use a dehumidifier as my part of the country is pretty perpetually damp.
 
Jul 10, 2020
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It has a seven year warranty. It's a manufacturer's warranty. Not Amazon warranty. So of course Corsair would be the one to replace it.

Curious as to what the lot code of the PSU was? Do you have the first 8 digits of the S/N? It's on both the PSU and the box.

Thanks!

I'll also point a customer service rep to this thread.
The first 8 digits of the serial number are: 20014851

Wow, a seven year warranty! That's a relief, but also more of a mystery. I went with a Corsair TX because I'd heard only good things, seems even less likely it would just up and explode.

I can't help but think it must have been something in the environment that caused the problem, maybe my flat has shoddy wiring or something. I mean I've never known anything to short that explosively without some obvious sign of wear or very clear cause.
 

Wolfshadw

Titan
Moderator
It's a steady 22C (so around 70F I think?) in my office space and its been pretty standard for an English summer. I don't have aircon but I do use a dehumidifier as my part of the country is pretty perpetually damp.
Then I wouldn't expect temps to be a cause of the failure. Again, just likely the (bad) luck of the draw. If you can take advantage of the warranty program, go for it!

-Wolf sends
 

John Chesterfield

Honorable
Mar 22, 2015
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I know this is off-topic, but I have to say this: You Corsair dudes/dudettes are just the best.

You're in good hands @Iceni_ .
Agreed, they've shown excellent customer service, after first indicating that a customer service representative would be linked to this thread, that representative was onto this thread in just 18 minutes.

Credit where it's due, Corsair appears to look after its customers exceptionally well.
 
Reactions: FoxVoxDK
The first 8 digits of the serial number are: 20014851

Wow, a seven year warranty! That's a relief, but also more of a mystery. I went with a Corsair TX because I'd heard only good things, seems even less likely it would just up and explode.

I can't help but think it must have been something in the environment that caused the problem, maybe my flat has shoddy wiring or something. I mean I've never known anything to short that explosively without some obvious sign of wear or very clear cause.
Given your lot code, I fear that the issue may be the same contamination issue we saw with the SF Series earlier this year. The PSU is made in the same factory and during the same time frame, so it's not completely out of the question. We might not have seen it manifest itself in the volume we saw it in the SF Series because the TX-M doesn't have a zero RPM mode, so the PSU parts should stay cool and dry at all times.

I have seen a few issues in Brazil and India, but those places aren't even cool and dry even with climate control! :D
 
Jul 10, 2020
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Given your lot code, I fear that the issue may be the same contamination issue we saw with the SF Series earlier this year. The PSU is made in the same factory and during the same time frame, so it's not completely out of the question. We might not have seen it manifest itself in the volume we saw it in the SF Series because the TX-M doesn't have a zero RPM mode, so the PSU parts should stay cool and dry at all times.

I have seen a few issues in Brazil and India, but those places aren't even cool and dry even with climate control! :D
Well now that I've read about the SF series issue, it might be worth noting that the area of England I live in is always high humidity and has had recent high temperatures (32C/90F)...which is hot for England :sweatsmile:

I still can't help but think it was something to do with my apartment's wiring or maybe just some seriously bad luck. Having now had a chance to go through the rest of the system and check case edges, wires, and the mobo I haven't found anything amiss. I intend to do a proper strip down tomorrow to check if anything has blistered, discoloured or warped. Fingers crossed that everything else has escaped unscathed!
 

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