Question So, the Motherboard is broken? No boot, No display.

jcdomingo

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So, I finally got some time to "properly diagnose" my Desktop PC that crashed several months ago. One day It just randomly shuts down then it won't boot anymore with no display whichever display port I used from the Motherboard or from the Video Card.

  • 6 case fans are still lit and spinning including the CPU fan.
  • The RGB of the Video Card is not lit but the fans are spinning I think at full speed.
  • Red light indicator for the CPU in the motherboard is lit.
  • All my connectors/wires are working properly tested.
Method:
Motherboard (with CPU cooler/fan intact) + 2 RAM sticks + PSU + HMDI connector.

PSU
  • I diagnosed the power supply first using the paperclip method. It's still working, and the fan is spinning.
  • I used both a multimeter and a power supply tester I bought online to measure (12V, 3.3V, 5V rails) if it's outputting the proper voltage with each port/connector. Yup they're all working.
*I concluded the the PSU is not the problem?

2 RAMS
  • My motherboard has 4 slots, so I tried sticking 1 RAM for each slot every boot
  • After 8 boots + 2 boots for dual channel, with both RAMS, No success.
*I can also conclude the RAMS are not the problem since there is no way both RAMS would fail/broke at the same time, right?
*Could also be a problem with the 4 RAM slots?
*UPDATE: I just borrowed a RAM from a friend and after testing it in each 4x slots, it's still failed to post/display anything. Does that conclude that my RAM sticks are also not the problem? What to do next?

Motherboard
  • Checked everything for burns, or bent components, capacitors. Visually, it looks okay.
  • What is that RED light indicator means? for the CPU?
  • CPU fan still works
CPU
  • I've red and watch some technicians say they've built and repaired lots of computers and it's almost never about the CPU being broken. (I never dropped it or anything that may cause harm to it)
  • I also slightly overclock my i5-8600K to 4.5Ghz whenever I play some games/editing and revert it back to normal after. I use the XTU software for OC
*I assume my OC profile is safe since it never crashed/overheated with that profile after 4 years of using it.

*So, can I finally conclude the Motherboard is the most likely the culprit of the problem?
*I've also encountered someone who had the same problem. Buying a new Motherboard solved it for them.
*What else should I do?
*SHOULD I START TO BROWSE/BUY A REPLACEMENT?


Full Specs:
CPU: i5 8600K
GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1060 6GB G1 (rev 2.0)
Motherboard: Gigabyte Z370 HD3
RAM: 2 x 8GB HyperX DDR4 2400mhz
PSU: EVGA 650 GQ Gold
Fans: 6x via molex + 1 CPU fan/cooler Deep Cool
 
Last edited:

Lutfij

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Moderator
I diagnosed the power supply first using the paperclip method. It's still working, and the fan is spinning.
The paperclip method is flawed, it can't tell you how much power the PSU can effectively output. Have you tried working with another reliably built 650W PSU borrowed from a friend or neighbor? Please note, your entire build should have 650W of power at it's disposal.

PSU: EVGA 650 GQ Gold
How old is the PSU?

Have you tried removing all fans, working with the bare minimum in a breadboarded style? Use the rams on a donor system to rule out the sticks being the issue. If you had access to a CH431A BIOS programmer, you could reflash the BIOS chips and see if that would alleviate the issue. I've had to reflash the BIOS on some older platforms, platforms that looked dead to pretty much anyone else.
 

jcdomingo

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I diagnosed the power supply first using the paperclip method. It's still working, and the fan is spinning.
The paperclip method is flawed, it can't tell you how much power the PSU can effectively output. Have you tried working with another reliably built 650W PSU borrowed from a friend or neighbor? Please note, your entire build should have 650W of power at it's disposal.

PSU: EVGA 650 GQ Gold
How old is the PSU?

Have you tried removing all fans, working with the bare minimum in a breadboarded style? Use the rams on a donor system to rule out the sticks being the issue. If you had access to a CH431A BIOS programmer, you could reflash the BIOS chips and see if that would alleviate the issue. I've had to reflash the BIOS on some older platforms, platforms that looked dead to pretty much anyone else.
Hello, I really appreciate the reply.

  • That's why I used I multimeter and an oem power supply tester to confirm the voltage output for each connector. Both tests are more or less the same voltage output. Does that not confirm that the PSU is safe?
  • It's 4 years old; since 2018
  • Yes, I removed everything leaving only the mobo, rams and psu. Unfortunately, all the spare computers in the house and my friends are either old or new that doesn't support ddr4 anymore. I could still ask someone tho If can borrow instead and vice versa. Can I buy the CH431A BIOS programmer online? is it easy to use?
  • Btw. My Mobo uses DualBios isn't it fail safe if there's a backup?
 
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jcdomingo

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UPDATE: I just borrowed a RAM from a friend and after testing it in each 4x slots, it's still failed to post/display anything. Does that conclude that my RAM sticks are also not the problem? What to do next?
 

jcdomingo

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Please stick to one thread unless you want the community to end up with spaghetti brains.
Yeh my bad. I thought someone could look it up with other threads. I'm getting impatient. All I need to know is would it solve the problem if I buy a new mobo? I just ordered a BIOS programmer btw. That's my last resort if it's still fails, I don't know anymore.
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Troubleshooting isn't about pointing a finger and hoping that the blame was worthwhile. You need to go through a process of elimination, meaning swapping your parts in/out with known working components until you're left with the logical conclusion that XYZ component is the issue.

You might want to try and comprehend that (exact)replacement parts for a platform as old as yours would probably cost the same as buying into a new build if you start going down the rabbit hole of buying parts to identify the culprit, which is why you borrow parts or you take yours over to a friend or neighbor.
 
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jcdomingo

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Aug 8, 2019
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Troubleshooting isn't about pointing a finger and hoping that the blame was worthwhile. You need to go through a process of elimination, meaning swapping your parts in/out with known working components until you're left with the logical conclusion that XYZ component is the issue.

You might want to try and comprehend that (exact)replacement parts for a platform as old as yours would probably cost the same as buying into a new build if you start going down the rabbit hole of buying parts to identify the culprit, which is why you borrow parts or you take yours over to a friend or neighbor.
Yeh what I can take with this experience, is I'm learning a lot. The things I hope I knew in the past and I would carry in the future if ever.
Yeah, I'm browsing online and the cost of a motherboard replacement (z370/z390 is really rare right now except for used ones.) is just a tad lower compared to an i3/i5 mobo combo of today.
But based on what I gathered/tested, can you give me at least an idea or what's your take about the issue? What could it be?
 

jcdomingo

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I diagnosed the power supply first using the paperclip method. It's still working, and the fan is spinning.
The paperclip method is flawed, it can't tell you how much power the PSU can effectively output. Have you tried working with another reliably built 650W PSU borrowed from a friend or neighbor? Please note, your entire build should have 650W of power at it's disposal.

PSU: EVGA 650 GQ Gold
How old is the PSU?

Have you tried removing all fans, working with the bare minimum in a breadboarded style? Use the rams on a donor system to rule out the sticks being the issue. If you had access to a CH431A BIOS programmer, you could reflash the BIOS chips and see if that would alleviate the issue. I've had to reflash the BIOS on some older platforms, platforms that looked dead to pretty much anyone else.
So I just tried your suggestion of reflashing the BIOS using the CH341A BIOS Programmer I bought online; the process was straightforward and smooth but still It didn't do anything. My final solution would be to drop my PC to a shop. Hopefully It's just the motherboard.
 

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