So was Ivy Bridge worth waiting for?

zyzz

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So I read some reviews last night. Apparently the Ivy can get quite hot because of the solder they used or something.

So is it really worth waiting for now? I thought I would wait it out for my new gaming rig.

I am going to get an I5 2500k and I want to overclock in the future since I have never overclocked before.
 

Robi_g

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It's not the solder they found out. Unless you're overclocking above 4.5Ghz then get Ivy bridge i5 3570k, Ivy doesn't like voltage so use the minimum for your overclock to minimise temps.
 

farrengottu

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for people that had high end i5s or i7s from either of the first two generations( ie i7 920, i5 2500k), it wasnt worth waiting. but it was a tick not a tock for intel. so not much of an improvement was expected. though they did modify the architecture more than they normally do.

it still overclocks fantastically in my opinion. you can jump it up 500Mhz without touching voltage. thats awesome. but it does tend to top off at 4.8GHz some do 4.9GHz before there is a sharp increase in temp for any additional speed increase. so if you for some reason want 5GHz and will settle for nothing less go 2500k but a 3570k at 4.8 will be faster. and use less power.

ive read about 5 reviews on the new line of processors and if i wasn't already rocking a i7 950 i would have grabbed a 3570k in a heartbeat.

make sure you get a motherboard that supports virtu mvp. it will make your games much smoother.
 

SSri

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if you own a pre-i7 CPU release, take IB and do not overclock excessively by ensuring the voltage and the temp do not exceed above the recommended levels. If you have a pc with the i5 or the i7 (3-4 years old), try overclocking them and wait for Haswell.
 

InvalidError

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The higher temp on IB is partly due to using paste instead of solder TIM between the CPU die and heat-spreader and Intel says this was expected. Nothing to 'fix' there, it is as-designed unless they end up with an unexpected increase in field failure rates that get traced back to this change.
 

zyzz

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I will be buying my next computer for pure gaming. as stated in OP I have never overclocked and I want that option.

So Ivybridge doesn't seem worth it if I can't overclock to the maximum.

 
I was a bit disappointed.
The higher efficiency per clock was as expected, but the reduced upper limit of an OC was not.

If you have a 2500K, there is little reason for the gamer to upgrade to a 3570K.

But, if this is a new build, then I would go for the 3570K at a similar price. With a safe OC, you will do as well, or better than a 2500K.
 

ohyouknow

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Once you start overclocking you will naturally gravitate towards watching cpu temps. Get the sandy bridge i5 so you will have peace of mind.

Or you can always wait for a new stepping and compare people's results. Cheers and GL.
 

Thrin

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The i5-3570k is the new unlocked Ivy bridge i5 chip.

In terms of performance over the i5-2500k they are almost identical. The i5-3750k performs slightly better than the i5-2500k at non-overclocked status. The slightly is around 5%-10% in different tests.

http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/4618/ivy_bridge_preview_with_gigabyte_z77x_ud5h_intel_z77_and_core_i5_3570k/index10.html

In terms of overclocking the 2500k overclocks to a higher Ghz easier compared to an i5-3570k. But, the i5-3570k overclocks with a lower voltage and uses less power for the performance gain.

For me, I purchased an i5-3570k because it was cheaper than the i5-2500k at the time of purchase and I used the savings to buy a Solid State Drive where I'll see greater gains compared to the small potential performance gain of overclocking an i5-2500k versus overclocking an i5-3750k.

From what I've read it isn't clear that there is actually a performance gain of an overclocked i5-2500k versus an overclocked i5-3750k. I haven't found a one to one comparison of benchmarks on the same platform I am just going with popular opinion of people who i5-2500ks and have overclocked them to around 5Ghz.

Performance of i5-3750k overclocked compared to other CPUs. Unfortunately they didn't compare to an i5-2500k overclocked.

http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/4621/intel_ivy_bridge_overclocking_with_the_core_i7_3770k_and_core_i5_3570k_cpus/index7.html

Good article regarding overclocking the i5-3750k:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5763/undervolting-and-overclocking-on-ivy-bridge
 

InvalidError

Titan
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And this is becoming even truer with each passing year as more low-end CPUs are becoming sufficient for an increasingly broader variety of formerly CPU-bound everyday tasks, which has the effect of accentuating the "diminishing return" character of processing power beyond that.

My Core2Duo is still good enough for most of my everyday stuff so I am not in much of a hurry to go ahead with my i5-3470 upgrade. I could shave a few bucks by aiming for future i3-3xxx but then the typical perceived performance difference would likely not feel worth bothering with.
 
G

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FYI, i had an immediate impact going from a overclocked E8400 to the i3 2120. windows booted faster and most apps start as soon as i lift my finger from my mouse button. i am NOT saying a C2D is slow or old however.

i can't say much for gaming because i also upgraded from a 9600GT to a 550ti . .so that isn't exactly objective.

but it is night and day between a core duo and a sandy.
 

zyzz

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My upgrade will be from an AMD 64 X2 6000+.

I was waiting for ivy bridge since january. but now that it looks like it can't overclock as well I might as well get sandybridge before they are all gone.
 

InvalidError

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Since load times are heavily disk-bound, I'm a bit puzzled about how/why a faster CPU would help. Other factors that may be related to the platform upgrade probably contribute more than the CPU itself.

That said, I have no idea how long my C2D takes to boot since I reboot it less than once a month for updates and I usually go AFK when I initiate the restart, shaving 10 seconds off a non-interactive process is of relatively little importance.
 
G

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you got a point there and i did use some rather poor examples.

though true we are looking at faster RAM DDR3 as opposed to DDR2 but, i guess that just comes with the neighborhood.

best i can say is i seen my DVD encodes speed up to about 30% faster with convertX to DVD which doesn't use quick sync. what took 17- 20 minutes is now around 12 minutes.
 

evan1715

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i have a 3770K @ 4.4GHz with temps reaching a max of 60C but average in the 40's during gaming.
i reached 4.4GHz at stock voltage too, didn't change anything except the multiplier.

i have a cooler master hyper 212+ on it.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835103065

i waited for ivy bridge, it was worth it to me.

edit: also, it may be "more hot" but realize that intel raised the official TJ MAX Temp of ivy bridge to 105C instead of 95. so u can go up to 95C and shouldnt have to worry, u shouldnt but still.
 

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