[SOLVED] SOLVED: Unable to connect to TM-AC1900 Router After Resetting

scwtlover

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Mar 10, 2009
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We have internet access through Verizon FiOS, to which is connected an old, but functioning TM-AC1900 (Asus) wireless router. Until the problem I'm about to describe arose, this allowed for five networks: 2.4 and 5G on both Verizon and the Asus router, as well as a "public" network.

Having just installed an SSD as my new boot drive and done a fresh install of Windows 10, I thought I would check out the settings on the Asus router. Unfortunately, I had forgotten the login information and could not find a written record. Simple enough, I thought. I'll reset the Asus router and start over again. But after successfully resetting, such that the Asus router now appears in the list of available networks under T-Mobile's "Cellspot" name, instead of the network name I had given it, I'm unable to reach the router's address using either my Dell XPS 8930 desktop or HP laptop. Instead, I see the following: This site can't be reached 192.168.29.1 took too long to respond.

In the Asus Discovery utility program, which gave me the IP address mentioned above, clicking on the line for the router yields the following message: TCP/IP Properties Your computer and your wireless router are on a different subnet mask. Ensure that the IP addresses of both your computer and your wireless router are on the same subnet mask. Below this message are a blank field to enter Default Gateway; Enable DNS (with a checkbox); and blank fields for Preferred DNS Server, Alternate DNS Server, and Domain Suffix Search Order.

I don't really understand what's going on, even after some time spent searching, including some older threads in this forum. I'm looking for advice on how to regain access to the T-Mobile/Asus router.

TIA

I have run ipconfig /all, with the following results:

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : [redacted]
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : fios-router.home

Ethernet adapter Ethernet:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : fios-router.home
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Killer E2400 Gigabit Ethernet Controller
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 14-B3-1F-2A-00-EA
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::1084:2d2b:8551:71e9%15(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.13(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Thursday, April 16, 2020 12:36:53 PM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Friday, April 17, 2020 12:36:51 PM
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 102019871
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-26-29-2E-C8-14-B3-1F-2A-00-EA
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled
Connection-specific DNS Suffix Search List :
fios-router.home

Wireless LAN adapter Wi-Fi:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Qualcomm QCA9377 802.11ac Wireless Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : B0-52-16-1C-B1-2B
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 1:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : B2-52-16-1C-B1-2B
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Wireless LAN adapter Local Area Connection* 2:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft Wi-Fi Direct Virtual Adapter #2
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : C2-52-16-1C-B1-2B
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

Ethernet adapter Bluetooth Network Connection:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Bluetooth Device (Personal Area Network)
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : B0-52-16-1C-B1-2C
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
 

scwtlover

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Mar 10, 2009
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With the help of more web searching and some luck, I found a solution that ended up being quick and easy to implement.

As mentioned in my original post, we get our internet connection from Verizon. The TM-AC1900 router is connected to the Verizon box by cable. I somehow got to router-network.com, and then to router-network.com/asus-router-login, where I found easy-to-apply instructions.

First, I disconnected the cable from the Verizon box and reconnected it to my computer. Using a browser, I then was able to reach the Asus router's web address, which I knew from using the Asus Discovery utility, and which the website confirmed as a common IP address for this model.

Second, having created my problem by resetting the router, I was able to login to its graphical interface by using the default information on the sticker on the router.

Third, I then changed the default entries for accessing the internet, for example chaing the IP address from 192.168.29.1 to 192.168.1.N (where N stands for the number actually used).

Fourth after applying the new settings and logging out of the router, I restored the original cable connections. As a result, everything is working properly.
 

ktriebol

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Feb 22, 2013
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Just for information, the subnet mask is the third set of numbers, for example in IP address 192.168.29.1 , the subnet mask is 29. Your error message is telling you that both your wireless router and your computer need to be on the same subnet mask, so check the IP address for both of them to see if they are the same. Once you get this squared away, I suggest that you do two things:
  1. Document all of your settings.
  2. Save your router configuration file somewhere on your computer.
 

scwtlover

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Mar 10, 2009
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Just for information, the subnet mask is the third set of numbers, for example in IP address 192.168.29.1 , the subnet mask is 29. Your error message is telling you that both your wireless router and your computer need to be on the same subnet mask, so check the IP address for both of them to see if they are the same. Once you get this squared away, I suggest that you do two things:
  1. Document all of your settings.
  2. Save your router configuration file somewhere on your computer.
I'm easily confused. The ipconfig results, agreeing with the Asus Discovery utility, say that the subnet mask is 255.255.255.0.

Regardless, am I right in thinking that the local lP address of my computer is the address opposite IPv4 Address, or 192.168.1.13? Its third number, "1," is the same as the third number in what I'm supposing is the Verizon router's address: 192.168.1.1. If so, then you're right that the third number in each address is the same, namely, "1".

If I'm right so far, does this mean that the address for the Asus router needs to be 192.168.1.N, where "N" = a number not currently in use? If so, how do I change or assign a usable number to the Asus router?

Finally, for the moment, what importance, if any, should I attach to the blank fields in shown by the Asus Discovery utility?

Thank you.
 

scwtlover

Distinguished
Mar 10, 2009
31
0
18,530
1
With the help of more web searching and some luck, I found a solution that ended up being quick and easy to implement.

As mentioned in my original post, we get our internet connection from Verizon. The TM-AC1900 router is connected to the Verizon box by cable. I somehow got to router-network.com, and then to router-network.com/asus-router-login, where I found easy-to-apply instructions.

First, I disconnected the cable from the Verizon box and reconnected it to my computer. Using a browser, I then was able to reach the Asus router's web address, which I knew from using the Asus Discovery utility, and which the website confirmed as a common IP address for this model.

Second, having created my problem by resetting the router, I was able to login to its graphical interface by using the default information on the sticker on the router.

Third, I then changed the default entries for accessing the internet, for example chaing the IP address from 192.168.29.1 to 192.168.1.N (where N stands for the number actually used).

Fourth after applying the new settings and logging out of the router, I restored the original cable connections. As a result, everything is working properly.
 

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