Question Some help and advices setting up this home network!

Sep 19, 2021
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Hi, this is my first post on the forum, i been coming around since 2009 but never registered and account
Well i have some doubt and problem with my actual network config. i get by luck a HPE 1950 48g 2sfp+ 2xgt switch, a HP, hp 1910 24g je006a, a Router CISCO 1921, and a old IBM x3650, and a cisco small router RVS 4000 gigabit.(all cabling and nic are gigabit+)
So i started to set up the homemade "Server Rack", first a configured the ISP modem to be in bridged mode. after that and a lot of digging into cisco ios, i would able to set up the cisco 1921 to get DHCP NAToutside on Ge0/0 to the isp modem, and Ge0/1 NAT inside with static lan IP. Up to there i got internet acces from the router so my plan was to use the HPE 1950 as core switch, and the 1910 as Acces(i know mega overkill for home, ill do it more for the trip and less the final use.).
So at this point i go from Cisco 1921 Ge0/1 to the HPE switch, connect the 1910HP to the HPE and start to connect all of my acces point, server and desktop switches to the Acces switch(HP 1910). Everything works "Fine" but it is obviously not the proper way to do it, i can get into de HPE web panel adminstration, but i cant reach the 1910 WEB GUI, and idk why ,and its probable very soft hardened.

What would you do guy with a set up like that???
Other thing is that on the server ibm im running dual broadcom gigabit NICS, but on xcp ng virtualizing OMV i cany get it past 10mb/s on file transfer on SMB and idk why :S all my interface is gigabit.

Okay i open ears and thanks for reading.!
 
Are you sure the gui is enabled on the 1910. Many of these older devices use telnet and/or SSH to do configuration. I tended to always use a console port because it gets very messy once you start using vlans where you have to always have a port on the management vlan to use network configuration.

In general there is nothing wrong with the design. Using a cisco 1921 is not really recommended for any modern internet connection. Cisco places artificial throughput limits on their routers mostly to get you to buy a more expensive model. Most cisco routers like this were used to connect to stuff like T3 or T1 circuits rather than using it as a ethernet to ethernet internet router. The key problem is the huge bottleneck using NAT. Even the cheapest consumer router can do gigabit wan/lan NAT. This is because they all use a hardware offload feature so the cpu does not have to do the NAT. Cisco routers still use the CPU and will be slowed down. I forget how far but the cpu clock speed in those devices is not very much. Even if a consumer router needed to use its cpu for the NAT it would exceed the rate of a 1921.

Other than for learning cisco IOS commands the 1921 little use in a home environment. It all depends why you want to use that router. There are many other routers that will greatly outperform it.
 
Sep 19, 2021
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Hi thx for the extender answer!, i really dont know if the web gui for the 1910 is up, at one point i was able to connect to the web gui of that switch.
I have only 300mbps up and down, so the router its not bottlenecking, but nice to know, what one would you recommend me?? maybe try some DIY routers, i also like microtik products.

i have to update and reinstall rom bootloader on bot switches and upgrade firmware, learn some about the os of each device(cisco drive me nuts, from hp enviroment to cisco T_T)

so on paper the idea and set up is okay right??

i m trying to achieve a balanced gigabit connection all over my ethernet devices, and have everything in one place.
gigabit file transfer to the server, another one for virtualization etc...
I just want to have a above the average home network with these gift, and in the middle learn some about networks.

Thx i will try to que more in touch with ssh and how to set up these switches via terminal.


edit: so this router what was meant for?? connect differents subnets between them, connect a outside router to this one prior to the switch or what?? lol srry for my ignorance.
 
A 2921 is designed to connect a private network between office locations. It is designed to run on low speed circuits something like a ds3 which is only 45m. The key feature is it lets you put interfaces into router itself rather than using some kind of external modem.

It is not really designed to route even between ethernet subnets. It can do that but this function is normally done by a layer 3 switch that can do it much more efficiently.

It is mostly designed as a edge device to do in effect do mostly media conversion. I know we used to have them with mulitiple t1/e1 connections.....this was many years ago when communication between offices was still only 1.544mbps.

The key function is it is a actual router unlike the boxes you buy in the retail stores. It can run routing protocols that are used to provide redundant data connections.

I doubt you will get 300mbps of NAT/internet traffic through the router. If I remember correctly cisco only recommends 50mbps for that device but there recommendations tend to be very conservative. I doubt you will get much over 100mbps but the rates depend on the packet size because it is number of packet headers it must recalculate more than how much data is in the packet.
 
Sep 19, 2021
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A 2921 is designed to connect a private network between office locations. It is designed to run on low speed circuits something like a ds3 which is only 45m. The key feature is it lets you put interfaces into router itself rather than using some kind of external modem.

It is not really designed to route even between ethernet subnets. It can do that but this function is normally done by a layer 3 switch that can do it much more efficiently.

It is mostly designed as a edge device to do in effect do mostly media conversion. I know we used to have them with mulitiple t1/e1 connections.....this was many years ago when communication between offices was still only 1.544mbps.

The key function is it is a actual router unlike the boxes you buy in the retail stores. It can run routing protocols that are used to provide redundant data connections.

I doubt you will get 300mbps of NAT/internet traffic through the router. If I remember correctly cisco only recommends 50mbps for that device but there recommendations tend to be very conservative. I doubt you will get much over 100mbps but the rates depend on the packet size because it is number of packet headers it must recalculate more than how much data is in the packet.
Wow nice info, te router is giving 300mbps download and about 30mbps up(which is my normal isp speed).

So in this case, y can use the HPE switch to be the core switch and get handle of all l3 routing
And the 1910 only for access, what router to lan-> wan i should look into???
 

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