Question Speakers question

NEOCROM

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Recently i've bought some speakers, but the sound from the new ones are a bit different, a bit...stereo-ish, sounds feel like in a more open room or such, more sharp at some parts. I checked if something was enabled and such, nothing, so all fine there. Is this the nature of some speakers or are just my ears trying to adjust to this "new" sounds?
 
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It would help to know old and new speaker models.
But yes to answer your question.
Speaker designs vary astronomically.
Some are short/long throw or distance. Meaning their best listening area is close or far away from the speaker.
Then you have vertical/horizontal coverage. The area where everything sounds good.
Once you get too far left or right/above or below the speaker before you start losing parts of the sound.
The quality of the speakers is just as important. Not price, quality.
 

Paperdoc

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As above, speakers can vary hugely. Where you place them has an effect, of course. The "sharp" effect you describe may just be a differrent balance of bass and high frequencies. In fact, the new ones MAY be more "correct" in this than your old ones. Anyway, you normally CAN alter this in the settings of your sound system. MANY have options to adjust the "boost" of several frequency ranges, or to impose one of several pre-set audio response "curves" or "effects" to make the sound the way you like. Try those.
 

NEOCROM

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As above, speakers can vary hugely. Where you place them has an effect, of course. The "sharp" effect you describe may just be a differrent balance of bass and high frequencies. In fact, the new ones MAY be more "correct" in this than your old ones. Anyway, you normally CAN alter this in the settings of your sound system. MANY have options to adjust the "boost" of several frequency ranges, or to impose one of several pre-set audio response "curves" or "effects" to make the sound the way you like. Try those.
Feels sharp, or deep. Like i said, feels a bit stereo, or bass boosted. Really dunno what exactly i have to modify in order to match, almost, my previous speakers.
 

NEOCROM

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check the audio settings on your motherboard if you could ajust sound like theater or something else to see if they both match better .
I feel stupid for asking this. Audio settings on motherboard...you are not talking about the thing in bios or something, or you talking about something in the speakers properties?
 
I feel stupid for asking this. Audio settings on motherboard...you are not talking about the thing in bios or something, or you talking about something in the speakers properties?
Yes, software, in driver and it's properties as well as sound control program for audio system on the MB. Raltek for instance has two types of control programs depending on driver , "Realtek HD Audio manager" for proprietary audio drivers and for UAD (Universal audio drivers) is "Audio control center" which is an APP in W10 and W11. All have some kinds of settings including Equalizer for fine tuning.
 

NEOCROM

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Yes, software, in driver and it's properties as well as sound control program for audio system on the MB. Raltek for instance has two types of control programs depending on driver , "Realtek HD Audio manager" for proprietary audio drivers and for UAD (Universal audio drivers) is "Audio control center" which is an APP in W10 and W11. All have some kinds of settings including Equalizer for fine tuning.
So i need a software to modify and try to make the sound be similar to the previous speakers. And without it no chance to make that happen?
 

Karadjgne

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All speakers create sound based on a Bell Curve (yes, math!). With subwoofers they range from inaudible pressure waves to a manly man's voice. Tweeters will range from high notes on a guitar to making dogs howl.

Right in the middle of those ranges is the resonant pitch. That's the single most powerful and loudest frequency (note) for an equitable amount of power to other frequencies (notes).

For some subs, that's at 60Hz, for others it's at 47Hz, others 100Hz etc. That's where you get the most 'punch'. With your old speakers, those had a different resonant frequency for each of the included speakers. They might have had mediocre bass, strong mids, weak highs, and then your new speakers might have stronger bass, stronger mids, mediocre highs.

Which is going to change the sound table you are used to listening to. This is what an Equalizer is for, whether software or physical, to change the amplitude of the source particular frequencies which can add or subtract to the volume of any one note. So if the speaker sounds too 'tinny' for your liking, you can take a little of that out, if it sounds too 'muddy', you can clear it up, by enhancing or detracting the amplitudes of certain frequency ranges.

Most software equalizers have presets, like 'Pop' or 'Rock' or 'Jazz', but some will also include sound affects like 'Concert Hall' or 'Open Field', 'small Room' etc.

Put on your favorite music, or talk show or something you are very familiar with and know exactly how you like to hear, then adjust the equalizer to make that happen. On my pc, my new speakers had way too much highs and not enough bass, so I turned the speaker to face the wall 6inches away instead, thereby changing the sound stage. Got more bass and less highs.

Sound is a sine wave (yes, math again!). The most volume or punch will be at the top of the wave, looses power at the bottom, comes back to zero. A 60Hz bass wave is physically 15ft long sine wave. So to get the most 'punch' your head should be about 4ft away. In a car, that's awkward, so you place the sub to catch the 'next' wave at 15ft + 4ft, 19ft is easily do-able. For some, that means facing the sub towards the back of the trunk, for some it downward, or upwards or facing the driver.

Physical location, direction, refracted sound from objects or walls can play a massive role in exactly how you perceive the sound at the location of your ears.

Sound reproduction is highly subjective. It all depends on the individual tastes of the listener. Getting that 'right' sound can be a real pain as it often involves changing speakers, changing speaker locations or directions, lots of time messing around on the equalizer etc.
 
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