Question SSD drive can be used after 5 years ?

pikapika1998

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Dec 27, 2020
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hi , i am planning to buy sata SSD , probably samsung QVO 1tb , 3 years warranty or 300 tbw ( 300.000 gb ) , right ?
as far as studying online, I find that every day I only use 50 - 60 gb , so 300.000 : 60 = 5.000 days ( 10 years )

Is this right ? mean I can keep it twice as long?
 

Lafong

Respectable
hi , i am planning to buy sata SSD , probably samsung QVO 1tb , 3 years warranty or 300 tbw ( 300.000 gb ) , right ?
as far as studying online, I find that every day I only use 50 - 60 gb , so 300.000 : 60 = 5.000 days ( 10 years )

Is this right ? mean I can keep it twice as long?
You can keep it as long as it works.

That might be 50 hours or 50 years.

The 300 TBW matters very little to you EXCEPT if you make a warranty claim.

If the 300 TB was exceeded while you were still within the warranty period, Samsung would have no obligation to you. You exceeded the maximum.

There is very very very little chance you will write 300 TB within the warranty period...as you have calculated.
 

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
hi , i am planning to buy sata SSD , probably samsung QVO 1tb , 3 years warranty or 300 tbw ( 300.000 gb ) , right ?
as far as studying online, I find that every day I only use 50 - 60 gb , so 300.000 : 60 = 5.000 days ( 10 years )

Is this right ? mean I can keep it twice as long?
You have a 3 year warranty or 300tbw so you will not reach the 300 tbw before your warranty is up.

You can keep using it till it dies, it's not going to instantly fail at 300tbw, might not last that long might last longer.
 

Old Molases

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May 3, 2021
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Every digital storage device has drawbacks, and while SSDs are reliable, they can still lose data under certain circumstances. In fact, all SSDs have an expiration date — but figuring out that expiration date requires some complicated math.

The more you use your SSD, the less reliable it becomes. The good news: Wear leveling and other technologies have dramatically increased the expected operating lifespans of flash devices.
So, how long can you use an SSD before considering a replacement? While product warranties aren’t a great way to measure actual operating lifespan, they do provide some insight for SSD reliability. SSD manufacturers list total terabytes written (TBW) in their warranties, along with a traditional timeframe; if the user writes a tremendous amount of data to a solid-state drive, their warranty will expire.
The Samsung 850 EVO, for instance, has a limited warranty of 5 years or up to 300 TBW. The data warranty policy changes depending on the size of the drive, so larger drives usually have a longer TBW period. You’ll need to determine how much data you write on an everyday basis to make a reasonable estimate regarding lifespan; if you’re using your SSD as a media drive, for instance, it’s likely to hit its rated TBW fairly quickly, but if you don’t regularly write much data to the device, it may last longer.
This doesn’t mean that a Samsung SSD will immediately fail after surpassing 300 TBW. Many drives last for much, much longer, but generally, SSDs will begin encountering issues after about 5 years of typical use.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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but generally, SSDs will begin encountering issues after about 5 years of typical use.
As opposed to a couple of my 840 EVOs, that were in 24/7 use until a couple of months ago.
First installed Nov/Dec 2014...7 yrs, giving the same performance as Day 1.

You can't put a number on it like "5 years".
The manufacturer warranty is strictly a $$ game.
 
A lot of people will also tell you to replace hard drives after 5 years too. And heck, one of my NAS drives threw a SMART warning and it had a power on time of 4 years and some change. The other one seems fine though.

And heck people used to worry about cars no longer working after 100,000 miles (although that might've stemmed from people not knowing a 5 digit odometer just rolls over)

If you don't want to worry about this, have some sort of back up plan in place. Then there's really nothing to worry about other than how old the last backup is when the thing finally croaks.
 

USAFRet

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If you don't want to worry about this, have some sort of back up plan in place. Then there's really nothing to worry about other than how old the last backup is when the thing finally croaks.
Exactly.

My last 3 dead drives:
5 weeks - HDD
7 months - HDD
3 years - SSD

In all 3 cases, warranty replaced the physical drive, backups replaced the data.
 

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