[SOLVED] SSD life remaining drop 1% every month.

Feb 1, 2019
15
0
20
0
I use Kingston SA400S37240G. I check the Kingston ssd manager and the life remaining is 97%, I only used it 3 and half month, is this normal? I usually use it for download video and movie. 50gb++ write and transfer every month. and it's in my laptop, ssd temperature 45-53c. Is the ssd life remaining result normal?
trim is enable, defrag is off.
another question, should i optimize it using defragler?
 

geofelt

Titan
Any SSD has a limited number of writes per nand block.
The larger the ssd, the more writes it can handle.

How full is your ssd?
If it is near 90% full, there will be few empty nand blocks available and a write will need to do two reads and rewrites per update.
If you do a sustained download, the drive management may not be able to free up blocks well in a sustained manner.

I don't know if your rate is normal, but neither is your workload.
Just keep monitoring it.
When you reach the limit, your data will still be readable, allowing you to copy your data to a new larger ssd.

Defrag should have been turned off automatically.
It is very bad for a ssd and totally useless.
The purpose of defrag on a HDD is to gather related blocks to minimize drive latency. On a ssd there is no latency
making it useless.
Past that, the rearrangement will entail a large number of writes further diminishing you ssd update capability.
 
Feb 1, 2019
15
0
20
0
Any SSD has a limited number of writes per nand block.
The larger the ssd, the more writes it can handle.

How full is your ssd?
If it is near 90% full, there will be few empty nand blocks available and a write will need to do two reads and rewrites per update.
If you do a sustained download, the drive management may not be able to free up blocks well in a sustained manner.

I don't know if your rate is normal, but neither is your workload.
Just keep monitoring it.
When you reach the limit, your data will still be readable, allowing you to copy your data to a new larger ssd.

Defrag should have been turned off automatically.
It is very bad for a ssd and totally useless.
The purpose of defrag on a HDD is to gather related blocks to minimize drive latency. On a ssd there is no latency
making it useless.
Past that, the rearrangement will entail a large number of writes further diminishing you ssd update capability.
my ssd only use 60%, if it reach 80% I remove to external hdd. and i usualy download large file like 500mb to 3gb and download simultaneously. is it bad download file to ssd?
my laptop can only install 1 hard drive.
 

Rogue Leader

It's a trap!
Moderator
If I were you I'd download those big files to your external hard drive directly.

You have a unique use case in that you are doing a lot of writing to the drive. I think you still have a VERY long time before wearing it out, but in the same respect you are accelerating wear with it being filled that much and rewritten so often.
 

geofelt

Titan
What is your laptop?
Can you install a hard drive also or is your ssd the only drive you have and can install.

For storing large sequential files like videos, a HDD is really best.
Performance on a HDD for sequential files is quite good and the cost per gb is better.
If you have usb2.0, you would see little difference in performance downloading to a usb connected HDD.

How large of a ssd would you need to be able to store everything on the ssd?
1tb and even 2tb ssd devices are coming down in price.
 
Feb 1, 2019
15
0
20
0
What is your laptop?
Can you install a hard drive also or is your ssd the only drive you have and can install.

For storing large sequential files like videos, a HDD is really best.
Performance on a HDD for sequential files is quite good and the cost per gb is better.
If you have usb2.0, you would see little difference in performance downloading to a usb connected HDD.

How large of a ssd would you need to be able to store everything on the ssd?
1tb and even 2tb ssd devices are coming down in price.
old asus brand from 2012 only 1 hard drive. i need to remove dvd player to install second drive. ssd pretty expensive 500gb ssd price same as 2tb hdd.
I have try download to external hdd but it 10% slow download speed.
 

Satan-IR

Distinguished
Ambassador
I've read all replies and agree. Then again it won't hurt to lower temps inside the laptop although I know it's not that easy.

Repeated write operation of big files, in theory, is bad and lowers the life of the SSD then again 3.5 months and 50GBs per month over the period is 175GB. Even if total bytes written to disk is 100GB per month it should be 350GB.

Not sure how Kingston measures wear leveling and lifetime and what is the theoretical maximum number of writes the drives cell's can handle but I'd say if it actually stay on that trajectory, and doesn't go down as 12thmonkey said, it's kind of high.

I know it's more or less apples and oranges; but I have a 256GB Samsong 840 Pro, remaining life shows to be 95% in HD Sentinel and other utilities and the total bytes written stands at 9.3TB over 1040 days of work (power on time). That's nearly three years.

It's usually in a cooler temp bracket than your SSD. Average temp is around 35C and Maximum temp during entire lifespan shows 41C. I'm not saying the fact that in comparison and shear numbers it shows to be in a better condition than your (as far as wear and tear goes) is because it's been working at lower temps but I'd like to think and it's accepted that lower temps play a role in prolonging life of components.
 
Feb 1, 2019
15
0
20
0
If I were you I'd download those big files to your external hard drive directly.

You have a unique use case in that you are doing a lot of writing to the drive. I think you still have a VERY long time before wearing it out, but in the same respect you are accelerating wear with it being filled that much and rewritten so often.
I will try download to flash drive or external drive.
 
Feb 1, 2019
15
0
20
0
Your current reading is skewed by all of the initial writes that set the laptop up. So that 3% in 3 months is higher than it will average down to.

However even if it is the normal run rate that's still 8 years...
If it cant last for 5years++ it's ok cause my laptop is pretty old.
 
Feb 1, 2019
15
0
20
0
I've read all replies and agree. Then again it won't hurt to lower temps inside the laptop although I know it's not that easy.

Repeated write operation of big files, in theory, is bad and lowers the life of the SSD then again 3.5 months and 50GBs per month over the period is 175GB. Even if total bytes written to disk is 100GB per month it should be 350GB.

Not sure how Kingston measures wear leveling and lifetime and what is the theoretical maximum number of writes the drives cell's can handle but I'd say if it actually stay on that trajectory, and doesn't go down as 12thmonkey said, it's kind of high.

I know it's more or less apples and oranges; but I have a 256GB Samsong 840 Pro, remaining life shows to be 95% in HD Sentinel and other utilities and the total bytes written stands at 9.3TB over 1040 days of work (power on time). That's nearly three years.

It's usually in a cooler temp bracket than your SSD. Average temp is around 35C and Maximum temp during entire lifespan shows 41C. I'm not saying the fact that in comparison and shear numbers it shows to be in a better condition than your (as far as wear and tear goes) is because it's been working at lower temps but I'd like to think and it's accepted that lower temps play a role in prolonging life of components.
laptop have small space. it's hard to cool. I use a cooler but didn't notice any difference. cpu temp 50-75c make the ssd hot. i only 30day3hours power on hours and 293 power cycle count.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY