[SOLVED] SSD placement

noahmorgans

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Does it matter where I put my SSD in my computer?

I built this computer two years ago and just got an SSD. I accidentally zip tied all the cables through the SSD mounting brackets. Does it matter if I just set it inside? Is that a safety concern or should I try to redo it?
 

USAFRet

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Does it matter where I put my SSD in my computer?

I built this computer two years ago and just got an SSD. I accidentally zip tied all the cables through the SSD mounting brackets. Does it matter if I just set it inside? Is that a safety concern or should I try to redo it?
It should be mounted in a normal mount space. But an SSD is far less susceptible to vibration.
 
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USAFRet

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Does it matter where I put my SSD in my computer?

I built this computer two years ago and just got an SSD. I accidentally zip tied all the cables through the SSD mounting brackets. Does it matter if I just set it inside? Is that a safety concern or should I try to redo it?
It should be mounted in a normal mount space. But an SSD is far less susceptible to vibration.
 
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noahmorgans

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It should be mounted in a normal mount space. But an SSD is far less susceptible to vibration.
Follow up since you're the expert: Where do I find the SSD location in my files once I have installed it?

Also, will I be fine just copying and pasting files from my hard drive then deleting them off of the hard drive?
 

noahmorgans

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What "files" are we talking about?

More info please.
What drives are in this system?
What OS?
Disregard my first question, I figured that out. The only other drive is the original HDD. Windows 10 is the OS. Basically what I am asking is should I just be able to copy and paste all of the files from the HDD or would there be issues?
 

USAFRet

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Disregard my first question, I figured that out. The only other drive is the original HDD. Windows 10 is the OS. Basically what I am asking is should I just be able to copy and paste all of the files from the HDD or would there be issues?
You cannot do it like that.
There are specific tools and procedures to do this.
It is NOT a simple copy/paste.

Details required.
How much actual space is consumed on the current HDD?
What size/make/model is the new SSD?
 

noahmorgans

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You cannot do it like that.
There are specific tools and procedures to do this.
It is NOT a simple copy/paste.

Details required.
How much actual space is consumed on the current HDD?
What size/make/model is the new SSD?
444.6 GB are consumed on the current HDD. New SSD is a 1 TB TForce Vulcan.
 

USAFRet

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OK, this might be doable.

Assuming this is a desktop, these steps exactly:

-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
 

noahmorgans

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Nov 9, 2017
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OK, this might be doable.

Assuming this is a desktop, these steps exactly:

-----------------------------
Specific steps for a successful clone operation:
-----------------------------
Verify the actual used space on the current drive is significantly below the size of the new SSD
Download and install Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration, if a Samsung SSD)
Power off
Disconnect ALL drives except the current C and the new SSD
Power up
Run the Macrium Reflect (or Samsung Data Migration)
Select ALL the partitions on the existing C drive
Click the 'Clone' button
Wait until it is done
When it finishes, power off
Disconnect ALL drives except for the new SSD
This is to allow the system to try to boot from ONLY the SSD
Swap the SATA cables around so that the new drive is connected to the same SATA port as the old drive
Power up, and verify the BIOS boot order
If good, continue the power up

It should boot from the new drive, just like the old drive.
Maybe reboot a time or two, just to make sure.

If it works, and it should, all is good.

Later, reconnect the old drive and wipe all partitions on it.
This will probably require the commandline diskpart function, and the clean command.

Ask questions if anything is unclear.
-----------------------------
The current drive has both a C and A partition. I’m assuming there’s no way to just disconnect the A, so when I reboot I keep both plugged in?
 

USAFRet

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In your A partition, what do you have in there?
I ask, because 'A' is not recommended to use as a drive letter. If it won't break things and paths, change that.
(and not B either).

Then, proceed on with the migration thing as above. All partitions.
 
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