[SOLVED] SSD with 80% life safe to use?

Dec 30, 2021
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It is important that you pay attention to the Crystal Disk Info about the life. But the most important information is in the right column which is Total Host Writes.
In the screen shot of your CDI this number is 39313 and you kept it on for 19364 hours or a little over 2 years.
If you consider this test (https://techreport.com/review/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead/) done with 240gb ssds in 2015, you will find that they can hold an average use of 700TB.
In your case, you consumed 40TB in 2 years (20TB per year)
If your SSD had 240gb of capacity it should last even more 33 years!!!
But it has 1TB and so the recording expectation is much higher.
In the case of tests with 240GB I would be very conservative and I would consider 50% of the expectation as more than enough.
The SSD is more likely to "die" for other reasons, such as experiencing failures when reading and writing, having reallocated sectors, and in some cases, refusing to write. All of them could occur tomorrow or 15 years from now. So doing regular backups is still the best suggestion.
 
Dec 30, 2021
38
5
45
4
It is important that you pay attention to the Crystal Disk Info about the life. But the most important information is in the right column which is Total Host Writes.
In the screen shot of your CDI this number is 39313 and you kept it on for 19364 hours or a little over 2 years.
If you consider this test (https://techreport.com/review/27909/the-ssd-endurance-experiment-theyre-all-dead/) done with 240gb ssds in 2015, you will find that they can hold an average use of 700TB.
In your case, you consumed 40TB in 2 years (20TB per year)
If your SSD had 240gb of capacity it should last even more 33 years!!!
But it has 1TB and so the recording expectation is much higher.
In the case of tests with 240GB I would be very conservative and I would consider 50% of the expectation as more than enough.
The SSD is more likely to "die" for other reasons, such as experiencing failures when reading and writing, having reallocated sectors, and in some cases, refusing to write. All of them could occur tomorrow or 15 years from now. So doing regular backups is still the best suggestion.
 

Pextaxmx

Commendable
Jun 15, 2020
306
34
1,740
7
I believe your Toshiba XG4 uses planar TLC NANDs. Which is supposed to be less durable than modern 3D TLD NANDs or any MLC (thus it is already 80%) but that's just relative and theoretical measure. I haven't seen any SSD dying from NAND wear (except those famous intentional PB writing experiments)
I would not worry about the drive lasting "couple more" years.
 

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