Question Standby list

kurdtnz

Estimable
I have 2x8 (16gb) of 3600MHz RAM. I noticed on the Resource Monitor, a hell of a lot of the memory can be 'stored' (sometimes 8-9gb, especially when/after gaming.) on the standby list which in turn can make your usable RAM really low. I just use the RaMMap ap to clear the standby list but it does fill up again pretty quickly which can sometimes impact on your gaming by giving you micro-stutters. There is some software out there called 'empty standby list' which automatically clears your standby list every 5mins and works continuously in the background. Does anyone use this software and are there any drawbacks if you do?
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Ive had the PC on for 4-5hrs with resource monitor running, this is what it looks like after that duration. Imgur: The magic of the Internet and Ive only been watching online news programs, web surfing etc.
I guess the key question is why do you believe that this is significant? Standby memory has zero impact on performance and is, in fact, helpful. These solutions are only if Windows isn't properly releasing standby memory as needed and nothing you've shown demonstrates that is the case. Without that being a problem, this is the equivalent of a restaurant worrying that people want to eat at their restaurant; having customers is only a problem if you've booked too many tables.

So, do you actually have micro-stutters rather than it just possibly being a problem in some cases? And if so, what else have you done to verify that this is the problem and not one of many far more likely issues?
 
Reactions: kurdtnz
Ive had the PC on for 4-5hrs with resource monitor running, this is what it looks like after that duration. Imgur: The magic of the Internet and Ive only been watching online news programs, web surfing etc.
I don't see that kind of standby usage after multi hours of use.
I don't know if it's a problem or not.

If you find it does cause a problem perhaps try shutting down background task and see if you can spot something that causes this.
 
Reactions: kurdtnz
Standby memory is data that applications have released but Windows thinks it's a good idea to keep around, just in case.

Like here's a test: restart your computer, open your web browser or some other app that takes a while to bring up, close it, then bring it up again. Chances are it'll come up much quicker. This is because most of what the app already needed is still in RAM in the Standby region.

Windows will start overwriting the Standby region with data if more RAM is needed by applications.
 
Reactions: kurdtnz

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS