Stanford Researchers Discover a New Phase of Matter

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rubix_1011

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Stanford Researchers Discover a New Phase of Matter
Stanford's findings suggest that there is another phase in their copper-based superconductor
So which is it...did they actually 'Discover it' or did they simply find something that needs to be proven, first?

Perhaps you shouldn't be so quick to etch this information in stone. While it is still in the very early discovery phases and not completely validated, it could potentially be true. There is a huge difference to an initial discovery and writing it off as a new scientific law.
 

lashabane

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[citation][nom]rubix_1011[/nom]...Perhaps you shouldn't be so quick to etch this information in stone...[/citation]
Posting something on the internet is not "etching it in stone".
 

sseyler

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[citation][nom]rubix_1011[/nom]So which is it...did they actually 'Discover it' or did they simply find something that needs to be proven, first?Perhaps you shouldn't be so quick to etch this information in stone. While it is still in the very early discovery phases and not completely validated, it could potentially be true. There is a huge difference to an initial discovery and writing it off as a new scientific law.[/citation]

A phase of matter isn't "scientific law". Matter phases are emergent phenomena as a direct result of statistical mechanical properties of materials.
 

rubix_1011

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I disagree:

Reporting incorrect or invalidated information as truth is more permanent than you think. Take someone who has been wrongly accused of a felony. They often never recover once this has been removed...their name is permanently tarnished for a crime the did not commit.

The same goes for information- it begins as rumor and can be spread verbally or otherwise used and manipulated to work for or against a specific viewpoint.

And you think that once you delete an email from your inbox or remove a photo from a social site, it 'goes away forever'? Think again. Electronic information has an incredibly deep residual hold once it has been saved and submitted.
 
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"To reach superconductivity, superconductors are often cooled to absolute zero"

What?
 

scook9

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Not all the way to absolute zero, but within a few k of it. A more common and real world use of superconductors is the primary coils in MRIs which are also cooled by liquid helium
 

Anomalyx

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So this "state" of matter is kinda like plasma...?
Plasma isn't another state, it's just a hotter gas.
This new "state" doesn't sound like another state... just a colder solid.
 

brucek2

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Headline is way too sensational for the actual story. I was expecting to learn about a new alternative to solid, liquid, gas, etc.
 
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Yeah...absolute zero is impossible, what with the laws of thermodynamics standing in the way and all. Within a few fractions of a degree off absolute zero, sure.
 

Aragorn

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Plasma is formed by heating a gas and applying an electrical charge, but is is a different state of matter, a hotter gas behaves differently than a plasma.
 

acadia11

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[citation][nom]Anomalyx[/nom]So this "state" of matter is kinda like plasma...?Plasma isn't another state, it's just a hotter gas.This new "state" doesn't sound like another state... just a colder solid.[/citation]


That is incorrect, plasma, is in fact another state. It doesn't act like a gas at all, for example, it does not follow the Gas Law, although similar to a gas in the fact that it doesn't have a definite volume, the huge difference is plasma's are ionized and their electrons are not bound as they are in gas state, because, the have more energy to break away from the nucleus of the atom. A state of matter is essentially defined by the properties associated with that state. A gas is a gas because, it follows the gas law, liquads, plasma, and solid also have their on laws which define their volume, density, etc ... this new state, clearly, doesn't follow the laws of aolid or may so closely, but likek they said, they need to find out more about it's properties.
 

nebun

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[citation][nom]sseyler[/nom]I won't even start with how poorly-written this article is. I guess if you're not science-educated, though, it's pretty tough to "summarize" unfamiliar physical concepts.[/citation]
then stop visiting the site, and keep your comments to yourself.....problem fixed
 

acadia11

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[citation][nom]dragonsqrrl[/nom]"superconductors are often cooled to absolute zero"... not quite[/citation]

He's climbing in your window snatching up your kids, hide your kids, hide you are wife, you are so dumb, really really dumb ... but here for you non-educated folks, super-conductivity allows for fast processing speeds, duh ... hence if you cooled the copper ... i.e. copper transistors and they become super conductive imagine what kind of processing speed you could achieve. So, see, if you think, it's not so dumb after all ... it was actually quite clever.
 
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@acadia11

copper makes for a sux transistor not to mention semi-conductor

im still confused, are we talking about string-net liquids here (a state of matter that had been theorized for a while now, and contrary to the name is actually a solid that posses some qualities of liquids) or another state of matter altogether, it would be strange if there was another state of matter between solid, string-net liquids and liquids, seeing as string-nets are exotic enough already is there really enough room for another state of matter
 
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absolute zero has never been reached by man or naturally in the known universe, however, scientist have come extremely close to 0K.
 
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cooled to absolute zero, despite using an infinite amount of energy in the process... oo yeahhh
 

PreferLinux

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[citation][nom]acadia11[/nom]He's climbing in your window snatching up your kids, hide your kids, hide you are wife, you are so dumb, really really dumb ... but here for you non-educated folks, super-conductivity allows for fast processing speeds, duh ... hence if you cooled the copper ... i.e. copper transistors and they become super conductive imagine what kind of processing speed you could achieve. So, see, if you think, it's not so dumb after all ... it was actually quite clever.[/citation]
And how is it faster??? The electricity is transferred from A to B at the speed of light anyway, so how does that speed it up? I guess there wouldn't be any power loss in the transistor as it would have no resistance, but that won't help much as you will still have the power loss elsewhere.
 
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