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[SOLVED] Stock cooler for Ryzen 3700X or aftermarket for gaming?

Nanekud

Distinguished
Aug 12, 2012
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0
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So this build is for my wife's new gaming rig. I'm use to Intel, so I have been getting aftermarket coolers for every other PC I've built.

Not going to be overclocking much, if at all, but will be using this system for mainly gaming.

I'm trying to avoid water cooling due to the risk of leaks and such.

Going for a white/purple/pink color scheme inside, so if an aftermarket cooler is needed, please let me know if there are any that follow this.

The house gets to be a max of 75F or 24C in the dog days of summer.


PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor | $294.48 @ Amazon
Motherboard | Asus PRIME X570-PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard | $241.99 @ B&H
Memory | Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory | $174.99 @ Amazon
Storage | Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | $124.99 @ B&H
Storage | Western Digital Blue 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive | $86.99 @ Amazon
Video Card | MSI Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB GAMING X Video Card | $409.00 @ B&H
Case | BitFenix Enso ATX Mid Tower Case | $89.90 @ Amazon
Power Supply | Corsair RMx (2018) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply | $144.99 @ Best Buy
Case Fan | Aerocool Shark 120mm White 82.6 CFM 120 mm Fan | $14.98 @ Newegg
Case Fan | Raidmax NV-R120TP 64 CFM 120 mm Fan | $14.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan | Raidmax NV-R120TP 64 CFM 120 mm Fan | $14.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan | Raidmax NV-R120TP 64 CFM 120 mm Fan | $14.99 @ Amazon
Case Fan | Raidmax NV-R120TP 64 CFM 120 mm Fan | $14.99 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total (before mail-in rebates) | $1652.27
| Mail-in rebates | -$10.00
| Total | $1642.27
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-13 18:58 EDT-0400 |


Thank you in advance for any advice.
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
Ryzen 3000 behaves completely different compared to Intel and even it's older Ryzen cousins, and this behavior has caught many people off guard, even to the point of causing unnecessary panic.
1)'High' idle temps. Ryzen 3000 is very 'bursty' in nature. On lighter loads, it's just boosting to it's max frequency with minimal core activity, as opposed to across all of them like Intel's does.
2)Ryzen 3000 is Gpu Boost 4 in disguise. These cpus have more in common with Nvidia's 10, 16, and 20 series; it's temperature sensitive. The cpu will boost as high as it can on it's own depending on temperature headroom.
You may not notice a significant difference in cooling between multiple coolers, but it'll show itself in boost frequencies. For example, the stock cooler VS a Dark Rock 4:
With all the cpu's cores under load, both coolers see the cpu around 80C, but it's running at 4.1ghz on the stock cooler VS 4.3ghz on the DR4.

3)Overclocking these cpus via the traditional Intel all core OC has some caveats:
-single core performance is sacrificed for multi-core performance. It can't boost to it's max core frequency anymore because the user has stopped it. One isn't always running their cpu full bore, so why do that?
-some people have actually managed to degrade and destroy their cpus using 'general settings' that were considered safe.

4)The trick to optimal performance on Ryzen 3000:
-cooling
-memory frequency up to 3733mhz. 3200mhz is still fine and the current sweet spot on value. There are cheaper 3600mhz kits but a number of them have not so great timings out of the box.
-tightening the memory timings. 16CL or lower. There are Ryzen Dram Calculator guides out there on how.

5)The stock cooler is fine, but some people are put off by it's noise; that's the main reason to replace it.
Give it a chance - set a fan curve you're comfortable with in bios, and if your experience isn't satisfactory, then replace it.
 

Barty1884

Titan
Moderator
The stock cooler, in a case with decent airflow and reasonable ambient is more than adequate.

An aftermarket isn't a bad idea as it'll run a bit cooler/quieter (depending on the cooler, of course), but I would definitely test it with the stock cooler initially before spending any money.
 

Nanekud

Distinguished
Aug 12, 2012
127
0
18,690
1
The stock cooler, in a case with decent airflow and reasonable ambient is more than adequate.

An aftermarket isn't a bad idea as it'll run a bit cooler/quieter (depending on the cooler, of course), but I would definitely test it with the stock cooler initially before spending any money.
That seems to be the general consensus from what I read online.

I will do that. What if I were to manually OC?
 

Nanekud

Distinguished
Aug 12, 2012
127
0
18,690
1
Don't OC Ryzen 3000. It does more harm than good.
These cpus behave differently to manual settings compared to Intel's.
Ok. With that in mind, do you agree that the stock cooler is sufficient enough for high-graphic gaming and running other programs in the background?
 

Phaaze88

Illustrious
Ambassador
Ryzen 3000 behaves completely different compared to Intel and even it's older Ryzen cousins, and this behavior has caught many people off guard, even to the point of causing unnecessary panic.
1)'High' idle temps. Ryzen 3000 is very 'bursty' in nature. On lighter loads, it's just boosting to it's max frequency with minimal core activity, as opposed to across all of them like Intel's does.
2)Ryzen 3000 is Gpu Boost 4 in disguise. These cpus have more in common with Nvidia's 10, 16, and 20 series; it's temperature sensitive. The cpu will boost as high as it can on it's own depending on temperature headroom.
You may not notice a significant difference in cooling between multiple coolers, but it'll show itself in boost frequencies. For example, the stock cooler VS a Dark Rock 4:
With all the cpu's cores under load, both coolers see the cpu around 80C, but it's running at 4.1ghz on the stock cooler VS 4.3ghz on the DR4.

3)Overclocking these cpus via the traditional Intel all core OC has some caveats:
-single core performance is sacrificed for multi-core performance. It can't boost to it's max core frequency anymore because the user has stopped it. One isn't always running their cpu full bore, so why do that?
-some people have actually managed to degrade and destroy their cpus using 'general settings' that were considered safe.

4)The trick to optimal performance on Ryzen 3000:
-cooling
-memory frequency up to 3733mhz. 3200mhz is still fine and the current sweet spot on value. There are cheaper 3600mhz kits but a number of them have not so great timings out of the box.
-tightening the memory timings. 16CL or lower. There are Ryzen Dram Calculator guides out there on how.

5)The stock cooler is fine, but some people are put off by it's noise; that's the main reason to replace it.
Give it a chance - set a fan curve you're comfortable with in bios, and if your experience isn't satisfactory, then replace it.
 

Nanekud

Distinguished
Aug 12, 2012
127
0
18,690
1
Ryzen 3000 behaves completely different compared to Intel and even it's older Ryzen cousins, and this behavior has caught many people off guard, even to the point of causing unnecessary panic.
1)'High' idle temps. Ryzen 3000 is very 'bursty' in nature. On lighter loads, it's just boosting to it's max frequency with minimal core activity, as opposed to across all of them like Intel's does.
2)Ryzen 3000 is Gpu Boost 4 in disguise. These cpus have more in common with Nvidia's 10, 16, and 20 series; it's temperature sensitive. The cpu will boost as high as it can on it's own depending on temperature headroom.
You may not notice a significant difference in cooling between multiple coolers, but it'll show itself in boost frequencies. For example, the stock cooler VS a Dark Rock 4:
With all the cpu's cores under load, both coolers see the cpu around 80C, but it's running at 4.1ghz on the stock cooler VS 4.3ghz on the DR4.

3)Overclocking these cpus via the traditional Intel all core OC has some caveats:
-single core performance is sacrificed for multi-core performance. It can't boost to it's max core frequency anymore because the user has stopped it. One isn't always running their cpu full bore, so why do that?
-some people have actually managed to degrade and destroy their cpus using 'general settings' that were considered safe.

4)The trick to optimal performance on Ryzen 3000:
-cooling
-memory frequency up to 3733mhz. 3200mhz is still fine and the current sweet spot on value. There are cheaper 3600mhz kits but a number of them have not so great timings out of the box.
-tightening the memory timings. 16CL or lower. There are Ryzen Dram Calculator guides out there on how.

5)The stock cooler is fine, but some people are put off by it's noise; that's the main reason to replace it.
Give it a chance - set a fan curve you're comfortable with in bios, and if your experience isn't satisfactory, then replace it.
Thank you for this in depth reply. We're not too concerned with PC noise, so we'll give the stock cooler a try. We have 2 kids that are always screaming running around behind us while we are attempting to game anyway, lol. So yeah, we'll give that stock cooler a try and see how things go. Thanks, again.
 

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