Question Stopping Windows 10 Pro automatically rebooting

paulb104

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I built my pc from scratch, having installed 10 Pro from initial get go. My wife's Dell computer came with 10 Home. After two years of the thing rebooting on its own, due to updates, sometimes while she's working on something, she finally upgraded to 10 Pro with the idea that once it went from 10 Home to 10 Pro it would stop rebooting on its own due to updates.

We were wrong.

For example, she was just doing something and a message just popped up: Time to Restart. We couldn't restart and update your device at the scheduled time blah blah. She used to used notepads to store info temporarily but had to stop since they get lost on the unexpected reboots. If she's working on photo editing, she might go to sleep with seven or eight images open and they'll all be gone in the morning and she'll have to go hunting for them.

In contrast, my 10 Pro has never, ever, rebooted on its own for an update, since it was installed.

Is there any way to make her 10 Pro act like my 10 Pro?

Thanks.
 

britechguy

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It doesn't suggest that it has the latest in this case.

Windows 10 has been reducing "automatic reboots" for some time now, and even the Feature Update from 1803 or 1809 to 1903 is not being downloaded and installed automatically on most machines. A link shows up on the Windows Update page telling you it's available and you trigger the download and install.

Microsoft can't win no matter what it does. Some people, and enough of them, have been complaining bitterly about automatic updates and, even more specifically, automatic reboots (and these made me POed at times as well), and as of Version 1903 much tighter user control is available for both of these things. Now some are complaining because the whole process "isn't automatic like it was."

If you are getting the auto rebooting behavior (at least if it's happening during active hours, which you set yourself) with the latest Version, 1903, and Build, 18362.295, then you have a corruption in your Windows 10 installation. In which case I'd strongly suggest doing the following, in order. You need do #2 only if #1 does not rectify the behavior:

1. Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10

2. Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file
 

paulb104

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It doesn't suggest that it has the latest in this case.

Windows 10 has been reducing "automatic reboots" for some time now, and even the Feature Update from 1803 or 1809 to 1903 is not being downloaded and installed automatically on most machines. A link shows up on the Windows Update page telling you it's available and you trigger the download and install.

Microsoft can't win no matter what it does. Some people, and enough of them, have been complaining bitterly about automatic updates and, even more specifically, automatic reboots (and these made me POed at times as well), and as of Version 1903 much tighter user control is available for both of these things. Now some are complaining because the whole process "isn't automatic like it was."

If you are getting the auto rebooting behavior (at least if it's happening during active hours, which you set yourself) with the latest Version, 1903, and Build, 18362.295, then you have a corruption in your Windows 10 installation. In which case I'd strongly suggest doing the following, in order. You need do #2 only if #1 does not rectify the behavior:

1. Using SFC (System File Checker) and DISM (Deployment Imaging Servicing and Management) to Repair Windows 8 & 10

2. Doing a Windows 10 Repair Install or Feature Update Using the Windows 10 ISO file
Thanks for the details and the clarification. Even before this new 1903 build, she's been dealing with the auto updates for years. We upgraded her Home to Pro about four months ago and the reboots are still happening albeit much less often.

Interestingly, moments after my last post I got a message on my machine that Windows needs to be rebooted for an update, and this is a message that I haven't seen in a very, very, long time. Just for the sake of looking, I saw that it would allow me to put off the reboot only six days.

As for her fixing her 10 Pro, I wonder if we would be able to do the ISO option as we downloaded the upgrade of Home to Pro from the Microsoft Store.
 

paulb104

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britechguy

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It doesn't matter where you got your Pro License from.

The Windows 10 ISO has the components needed for Home, Pro, Educational, and Enterprise (if memory serves correctly - I'm positive that Home and Pro are both there along with at least one other.

In fact, Windows 10 instances have this, too. It is the license key that determines what's activated, but not what parts are available for activation. That's why you have an option under Settings, Update & Security, Activation Pane, Change product key link. If you have, for instance, an instance of Windows 10 Home, and activate this link then enter a Pro key, Windows 10 does not reinstall. Instead it does some "voodoo" under the hood and, after it completes, you have Windows 10 Pro licensed and active on the machine.
 

britechguy

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The Media Creation Tool downloads the latest ISO (either as its file form, or by creating bootable media using the MCT directly to USB) for use on ANY machine.

There is nothing about the Windows 10 ISO file, or bootable media created using same, that is linked to the machine used to get and create same.

With each and every Feature Update I snag an ISO file using my computer that I use on any machine I might need it for.
 

paulb104

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You have been most illuminating! I'll do the same. I used to be more up on Windows repairs but since I switched to 10 I've had a virtually (pardon the pun) flawless experience. I haven't need to DO anything, if you know what I mean...
 

britechguy

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I used to be more up on Windows repairs but since I switched to 10 I've had a virtually (pardon the pun) flawless experience. I haven't need to DO anything, if you know what I mean...
Yes, I do. As a computer service tech I have seen my "Windows specific" based service calls drop dramatically since the introduction of Windows 10. I still get plenty of calls for PCs, but it's generally problems with applications software, drivers, peripherals, and other issues rather than Windows itself.

However, since I haunt technical support forums including this one, I have had plenty of opportunity to see issues with Windows 10.

What amazes me is that many people seem to think that what gets posted on support forums (and not just computer ones - automotive ones are the same - any tech support forum is the same) is somehow representative of the norm rather than skewed, greatly skewed, toward the tails of the bell curve. People don't post in places like this when everything is going swimmingly to report that. They post when they have issues. But those having issues are a very, very small number when compared to the whole user base. If you believed about cars what some seem to believe about Windows 10 based on support forum traffic you'd be convinced that very few of them have ever functioned and that they're destined to be a complete failure. It just isn't so.
 

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