Question Sudden GPU usage spikes, possibly outdated software or UEFI.

Sep 24, 2021
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So I've been using my PC like normal, but after a recent driver update it seems that my GPU suddenly has huge stutters and drops to 0 FPS in any game for 3 - 10 seconds with 2 - 5 seconds in between spikes. I normally get black screened just before it happens, and every game times out for a few seconds before the black screen.

Most sites and forums don't seem to help either, although a UEFI update might be helpful, though I can't seem to find one for my MB.

Specs:
  • ASRock Z370 Pro4 running on P1.90 from 14th of March 2018
  • Intel I5-8600 at around 4.1 GHz
  • Gigabyte Radeon RX Vega 56 8G @ 1740MHz core and 900MHz memory clock (Not pushed to the egde of what it can do)
  • 2x8GB 3000MHz G.Skill Aegis RAM
  • System running on a 240GB SSD from kingston, which isn't doing too well, but an upgrade is on the way. (480GB SSD for extra storage, but likely unrelated to the problem)
The problem is the program called "Radeon Settings: Host Service", which typically monitors and controls how the GPU operates, but sometimes it overdoes it, and most fixes on google says to turn off screen recorder, but this doesn't fix it for me, only lowers background usage, which honestly isn't a lot anyways, so there is no point in turning it off.

Usually starts to stutter whenever I start up a game, or there is intensive use of GPU, and doesn't stop, until a reset is done to the PC.

Thanks in advance. Even if it doens't necessarily help me, it might help someone else :)
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I don't have any idea what you are talking about.

There is only ONE firmware version revision for each new BIOS release. There are different ways to install that, but it's the same instruction set no matter what. And, I would NEVER, EVER, EVER recommend anybody update their BIOS from within Windows except on some laptops that won't allow you to do it any other way and don't offer any method for flashing the new BIOS version from within the BIOS. Far more risk trying to do it from within Windows, especially if it's a system in NEED of doing it because something has been going wrong or not working correctly. That's a really good way to brick your board.

Whenever possible, you should always go with:

1. BIOS Flashback and similar methods that can flash the BIOS without the system being turned on or even having a CPU installed. IF the board in question doesn't have that, and a lot of them do not, then:

2. Any of several manufacturer specific utilities, all of which involve flashing the BIOS from IN the BIOS.

3. If no other method is possible or allowed, from Within Windows IF the manufacturer has supplied a BIOS update utility meant to be run from within Windows.


In this case, both methods, Instant flash (ASRocks in BIOS flashing utility) and Windows BIOS version 4.3 is available on the page I linked to which you should have been able to see if you had visited that page. Note below, taken from that page, both versions.


 
Sep 24, 2021
6
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10
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Whenever possible, you should always go with:

1. BIOS Flashback and similar methods that can flash the BIOS without the system being turned on or even having a CPU installed. IF the board in question doesn't have that, and a lot of them do not, then:

2. Any of several manufacturer specific utilities, all of which involve flashing the BIOS from IN the BIOS.
I managed to flash the BIOS, but the issue is still not fixed. I have honed it down to being one of the drivers in the system, that may need a rollback or a newer update. Thanks for the effort, it is greatly appreciated.
 

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