Question Suddenly have to reboot computer 20 times before it boots

TRE IzDOPE

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like the title says, I have to reboot the computer at least 20 times before it boots up. It will restart itself a couple times each time, then eventually just hangs and does nothing, but eventually it goes to the logon screen after rebooting like 20 times.. can anyone tell me why this is happening? once the pc is started, it runs fine.. can play games and everything. I'm wondering if it's a hardware issue, I wouldn't know where to start, I don't have spare parts to replace and try out. I'm hoping someone has had this happen and can tell me what it was for them.

Windows 10 pro
EVGA SuperNOVA 750 G3 750 watt from 2017
G.SKILL Trident Z Neo (For AMD Ryzen) Series 32GB (2 x 16GB)
ASUS AM4 TUF Gaming X570-Plus (Wi-Fi
WD_BLACK 1TB SN750 SE NVMe SSD 35GB free
Samsung 860 Evo 1GB - 284GB free
gtx 1080 ti ftw3
amd ryzen 3900x
Dark Rock Pro 4 cooler for cpu

anything else you need to know please let me know
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition (original to build, new, refurbished, used)?

Disk drive(s): make, model, capacity, how full?

Immediately after the next successful boot go to Reliability History and look for error codes, warnings, and even informational event that you can associate with the failed computer reboots.

Fortunately, there are a number of options to determine why all those reboots
 

TRE IzDOPE

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Update your post to include full system hardware specs and OS information.

PSU: make, model, wattage, age, condition (original to build, new, refurbished, used)?

Disk drive(s): make, model, capacity, how full?

Immediately after the next successful boot go to Reliability History and look for error codes, warnings, and even informational event that you can associate with the failed computer reboots.

Fortunately, there are a number of options to determine why all those reboots
updated, thank you
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
A 4 to 5 year old PSU is an immediate suspect. May be nearing, at, or even beyond its' designed in EOL (End of Life). Especially if heavily used for gaming, video editing, or even bit-mining.

What error codes, if any, do you see? Increasing numbers of errors and varying errors is a symptom of a failing/faulty PSU.

Do you have all important data backed up at least 2 x to locations away from the problem computer? Verify that the the backups are indeed recoverable and readable.
 

TRE IzDOPE

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A 4 to 5 year old PSU is an immediate suspect. May be nearing, at, or even beyond its' designed in EOL (End of Life). Especially if heavily used for gaming, video editing, or even bit-mining.

What error codes, if any, do you see? Increasing numbers of errors and varying errors is a symptom of a failing/faulty PSU.

Do you have all important data backed up at least 2 x to locations away from the problem computer? Verify that the the backups are indeed recoverable and readable.
I have not backed up, I will do so.. I loaded up the reliability thing but it was hours after restarting, there were no error codes that I could see. I will check next time i'm forced to restart.. im afraid it will eventually just not start at all.. is there a way to find out if it is the PSU w/out putting another one in?
 

Ralston18

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TRE IzDOPE

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A PSU can be tested if you have a multi-meter and know how to use it. Or know someone who does.

Not a full test because the PSU is not under load. However, any voltages out of tolerance are a sign of problems.

References:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

https://www.techdim.com/test-computer-power-supply/

And for just general reading and background:

https://computer.howstuffworks.com/power-supply.htm
it's really scary when a windows update happens, cause you have to restart so many times.. if you had to put a number on it, how likely % wise do you think it is the PSU? That would be great if that is what it was cause they aren't that expensive.. I found a G6, newer generation of what I have for less than $90
it's just weird how it happened out of nowhere, had not had any issues.. last week I had a windows update and had to reboot and that is when it started.. had to reboot like 20 times before the update happened.. it does not even allow me to go to the bios, I reboot.. it lights up my keyboard like it's going to start and then reboots again on it's own.. then gets hung... happens over and over till it finally starts
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Power problems of any sort can spawn other problems.

For example that interrupted Windows update may have corrupted windows files and/or other files as well.

I would go 80% on the PSU being the problem but if the system overall is old the continuous reboots could have other causes or contributing causes.

= = = =

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, jumpers, and case connections are fully and firmly in place.

(All can become loose over time due to heat related expansion/contraction and vibrations. Can sometimes end after a few unsuccessful boots and the system has warmed up. 20 + failed boots is a bit too much though......

Use a bright flashlight to inspect for signs of damage: bare conductor showing, melted insulation, pinched or kinked wires, swollen components, browning or blackening, missing or loose screws.

= = = =

And go into BIOS and set the POST to verbose. That means that while the system boots it will display what is happening and the results. Takes longer than a normal boot but may yield a clue or two. The option may be worded differently so look carefully.

Any date or time related problems? A fresh CMOS battery might help and it is a good idea to install a fresh battery if that has never been done.

And again take some additional looks in Reliability History and Event Viewer once the system does manage to boot.

A pattern of increasing numbers of errors and varying errors are, in my mind, a sign of a faltering or failing PSU.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/how-to-use-windows-10-event-viewer.2752289/

For the most part, the objective is to narrow down possible causes either directly or by elimination.
 

TRE IzDOPE

Distinguished
Apr 3, 2013
81
2
18,635
0
Power problems of any sort can spawn other problems.

For example that interrupted Windows update may have corrupted windows files and/or other files as well.

I would go 80% on the PSU being the problem but if the system overall is old the continuous reboots could have other causes or contributing causes.

= = = =

Power down, unplug, open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, jumpers, and case connections are fully and firmly in place.

(All can become loose over time due to heat related expansion/contraction and vibrations. Can sometimes end after a few unsuccessful boots and the system has warmed up. 20 + failed boots is a bit too much though......

Use a bright flashlight to inspect for signs of damage: bare conductor showing, melted insulation, pinched or kinked wires, swollen components, browning or blackening, missing or loose screws.

= = = =

And go into BIOS and set the POST to verbose. That means that while the system boots it will display what is happening and the results. Takes longer than a normal boot but may yield a clue or two. The option may be worded differently so look carefully.

Any date or time related problems? A fresh CMOS battery might help and it is a good idea to install a fresh battery if that has never been done.

And again take some additional looks in Reliability History and Event Viewer once the system does manage to boot.

A pattern of increasing numbers of errors and varying errors are, in my mind, a sign of a faltering or failing PSU.

https://forums.tomshardware.com/faq/how-to-use-windows-10-event-viewer.2752289/

For the most part, the objective is to narrow down possible causes either directly or by elimination.
the PSU is the oldest part in the system, so that is why it really does make sense that it might be the PSU.. I will do everything you said.. I tried many times to go to bios but I didn't actually try the times it actually started.. so i would prolly have to just hit delete everytime I reboot. do you know how to do a system check of all files for integrity? I know theres a way to do it but not sure how.. I can look it up if you don't know off hand.
 

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