Question Suggestion for motherboard for Ryzen 5 3600

Saptarshi Mondal

Honorable
Jan 16, 2014
52
0
10,530
0
Hello,
It's me again..
I decided to upgrade my current intel build to a ryzen one.. to do that I need a motherboard , a CPU and RAM only...
I already chose my CPU to be Ryzen 5 3600 and a 16GB (8GB x 2) DDR4 kit from G.Skill for the memory..

For the Motherboard, what I initially chose was Asrock B450M Pro4 as I noticed many positive review on it's stability (including from LinusTechTips) during Overclocking.

But the problem is, that model is currently unavailable (any where). So I decided to get the Gigabyte B450 AORUS M .. But I haven't came across any review on it about its overclocking performance and stability..

If anyone can share their thoughts and experiences on it, that would be great...

Thank you,
Saptarshi
 

TJ Hooker

Illustrious
Herald
What do you mean??
Read some reviews of the Ryzen 3600 (or Ryzen 3000 CPUs in general) and look at what there overclocking results are like. Most of time the all-core overclock they can achieve is less than or equal to the normal max boost clock of the CPU, even with high end X570 boards. So in most cases manual overclocking results in a little better multithreaded performance and a little worse single threaded performance. For gaming, it often makes little difference, and can actually hurt performance a tiny bit in some cases.

If you liked the ASRock Pro4 a similar option would be the ASRock Steel Legend. If you're buying the board in person look for a little "ready for ryzen 3000" sticker on it, otherwise you'll probably want to confirm with the retailer that the board comes with a BIOS recent enough to support Ryzen 3000.
 

Saptarshi Mondal

Honorable
Jan 16, 2014
52
0
10,530
0
Read some reviews of the Ryzen 3600 (or Ryzen 3000 CPUs in general) and look at what there overclocking results are like. Most of time the all-core overclock they can achieve is less than or equal to the normal max boost clock of the CPU, even with high end X570 boards. So in most cases manual overclocking results in a little better multithreaded performance and a little worse single threaded performance. For gaming, it often makes little difference, and can actually hurt performance a tiny bit in some cases.

If you liked the ASRock Pro4 a similar option would be the ASRock Steel Legend. If you're buying the board in person look for a little "ready for ryzen 3000" sticker on it, otherwise you'll probably want to confirm with the retailer that the board comes with a BIOS recent enough to support Ryzen 3000.
So I have better chance of getting better performance by getting a 2600X and OC it than 3600?
 

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