[SOLVED] Super flower 1200w problem

Feb 24, 2021
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Hello! These days, my super flower 1200 watt power supply started to do a weird thing. Random restarts my machine ... I tried my current configuration with a 750watt power supply but no problem with that! Maybe someone has any idea what might be wrong?

i5 6600k
16GB memory
Sapphire Radeon R9 280X Vapor-X Tri-X
Gigabyte GA-Z170X-UD3
Kingston a2000 M.2 250gb
Toshiba 1TB 7200rpm SATA3
Arctic Liquid Freezer 360
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
It's plenty of power. The R9 295x2 has a tested maximum average power consumption of about 500w, and there is no way the rest of your system is going to use anything near 250w. I think an 850-1000w unit, IF it were a good model, would be better in general due to giving you a little more overhead to cover spikes or other system considerations, but as Jon has already told you he was running his R9 295x2 on an RMx750, so if you needed any proof that that power supply is capable enough of running that graphics card, well, that's pretty much all it should have taken to provide that for you. Not to mention there are several PROFESSIONAL, not "they said", reviews out there showing that full system power consumption is pretty well below 750w when using that card for the majority of systems.

Now, if you were using some kind of very high TDP processor, like some of the HEDT models, it might be a different story, and if you plan to upgrade your platform anytime in the next 5 to 7 years with a CPU that is a very high TDP model, then it might be a bit more indicative of the need for a higher capacity power supply as a necessity rather than just as a common recommendation.

So yes, it will run on an RMx750. An 850-1000w unit, IF it is a very good model, might be better, IF it is something that you can financially afford to do. If not, I think the RMx750w should be ok based on it's quality and the numbers alone.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Well, that power supply is likely somewhere around 7 years old based on reviews of Leadex Platinum 1200w which is what that Super Flower unit's model is. A very good power supply when it was new, but at anywhere from 5 to 7 years old it could certainly be going bad or developed a fault somewhere.

I'd say it could be something else rather than the power supply, but if you've tried another unit like you said you did, and didn't have the same problem, then the only answer can be that the power supply is bad. There is really no other answer.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
There is no way to "repair" a power supply. Not for anybody who isn't already a highly experienced electronics technician or engineer. In fact, messing around inside a power supply when you don't know what you are doing can LITERALLY kill you. Even when the unit is unplugged from power for a period of time. They are dangerous and you don't just "fix" them. You replace them, IF they are faulty.

First thing you want to probably do though if you have access to a volt meter is to do some testing of the unit to be sure that's actually what is wrong.

 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Right. They are just as complex as the rest of the electronics in your system. Certainly some people MIGHT be capable of repairing a power supply, but given that ALL components will have seen some degradation from aging and use, even if you have the knowledge, tools and parts to fix what is currently wrong, it's not going to improve the long term (Or short term even, in some cases) outlook for other failures in that unit and given the 7 year old age it's simply not worth the risk of your other hardware or yourself to bother with something that can be replaced for about 80-120 bucks that will last you another 7-10 years in all probability.

And, that system FOR SURE doesn't need anything near 1200w. A 650-750w unit, a QUALITY one, should be more than enough even with some moderate overclocking thrown in if you desired to do so.
 
Feb 24, 2021
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Right. They are just as complex as the rest of the electronics in your system. Certainly some people MIGHT be capable of repairing a power supply, but given that ALL components will have seen some degradation from aging and use, even if you have the knowledge, tools and parts to fix what is currently wrong, it's not going to improve the long term (Or short term even, in some cases) outlook for other failures in that unit and given the 7 year old age it's simply not worth the risk of your other hardware or yourself to bother with something that can be replaced for about 80-120 bucks that will last you another 7-10 years in all probability.

And, that system FOR SURE doesn't need anything near 1200w. A 650-750w unit, a QUALITY one, should be more than enough even with some moderate overclocking thrown in if you desired to do so.
Yes, in the meantime I got an R9 295x2 And it would have been nice if I could fix the 1200 watts. Because the 750watt corsair may not be good.
 
Feb 24, 2021
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As someone who's last rig had a 295x2 powered by an RM750x..... which Corsair 750W are you using?
Corsair 750W RM750x CP-9020092-EU type, but they said that it won't be enough to power it.

i5 6600k upgrade to i7 6700k
16GB memory
XFX Radeon R9 295x2
Gigabyte GA-Z170X-UD3
Kingston a2000 M.2 250gb
Toshiba 1TB 7200rpm SATA3
Arctic Liquid Freezer 360
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, they said it here and in other forums.
the 750w won't be enough
The only "they" you need to worry about when it comes to power supplies, are the handful of engineers and reviewers (Usually also engineers of some kind) that work day in and day out with power supplies. One of them happens to be the person responding to your questions in this thread, Jon Gerow, also known as Jonny Guru, who happens to be probably one of the top five or ten people in the world when it comes to being knowledgeable in the area of PC power supplies, and is also the head of power supply engineering for Corsair, among other titles held there. So, if ANYBODY in the world knows what a given Corsair power supply is capable of handling, it's him. There is absolutely no need to ask ANYBODY else, no matter who they are, a question regarding a Corsair power supply (Or most ANY power supply meant for use in a personal computing device for that matter) that he has already answered.

While it's true that Jon is human too, like the rest of us, it's equally true that you are about as likely to get a wrong answer in this area from him as you are to personally be smacked by an asteroid that has traveled across the universe with the sole intention of making it to Earth just to hit you.
 
Feb 24, 2021
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The only "they" you need to worry about when it comes to power supplies, are the handful of engineers and reviewers (Usually also engineers of some kind) that work day in and day out with power supplies. One of them happens to be the person responding to your questions in this thread, Jon Gerow, also known as Jonny Guru, who happens to be probably one of the top five or ten people in the world when it comes to being knowledgeable in the area of PC power supplies, and is also the head of power supply engineering for Corsair, among other titles held there. So, if ANYBODY in the world knows what a given Corsair power supply is capable of handling, it's him. There is absolutely no need to ask ANYBODY else, no matter who they are, a question regarding a Corsair power supply (Or most ANY power supply meant for use in a personal computing device for that matter) that he has already answered.

While it's true that Jon is human too, like the rest of us, it's equally true that you are about as likely to get a wrong answer in this area from him as you are to personally be smacked by an asteroid that has traveled across the universe with the sole intention of making it to Earth just to hit you.
Ok i understand that, but will Corsair RM750x CP-9020092-EU be enough for this setup? Non tuning, only for gaming.

i7 6700k
16GB memory
XFX Radeon R9 295x2
Gigabyte GA-Z170X-UD3
Kingston a2000 M.2 250gb
Toshiba 1TB 7200rpm SATA3
Arctic Liquid Freezer 360
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
It's plenty of power. The R9 295x2 has a tested maximum average power consumption of about 500w, and there is no way the rest of your system is going to use anything near 250w. I think an 850-1000w unit, IF it were a good model, would be better in general due to giving you a little more overhead to cover spikes or other system considerations, but as Jon has already told you he was running his R9 295x2 on an RMx750, so if you needed any proof that that power supply is capable enough of running that graphics card, well, that's pretty much all it should have taken to provide that for you. Not to mention there are several PROFESSIONAL, not "they said", reviews out there showing that full system power consumption is pretty well below 750w when using that card for the majority of systems.

Now, if you were using some kind of very high TDP processor, like some of the HEDT models, it might be a different story, and if you plan to upgrade your platform anytime in the next 5 to 7 years with a CPU that is a very high TDP model, then it might be a bit more indicative of the need for a higher capacity power supply as a necessity rather than just as a common recommendation.

So yes, it will run on an RMx750. An 850-1000w unit, IF it is a very good model, might be better, IF it is something that you can financially afford to do. If not, I think the RMx750w should be ok based on it's quality and the numbers alone.
 
Ok i understand that, but will Corsair RM750x CP-9020092-EU be enough for this setup? Non tuning, only for gaming.

i7 6700k
16GB memory
XFX Radeon R9 295x2
Gigabyte GA-Z170X-UD3
Kingston a2000 M.2 250gb
Toshiba 1TB 7200rpm SATA3
Arctic Liquid Freezer 360
Did you steal that build out of my garage? Because other than the cooler, that is LITERALLY the exact build I was powering with an RM750x.
 

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