Super Flower Claims World's First 2-Kilowatt Power Supply

Status
Not open for further replies.

ohim

Distinguished
Feb 10, 2009
1,195
0
19,360
26
Am i the only one that thinks power usage in a PC is out of hand ? I mean .. in the past we were on a 250 W PSU.. now you need 650 W GOLD PSU to be sure your PC will run without issues .. and now we have 2KW PSU .. i hope in 10 years this won`t be standard PC requirement ...
 

ShadyHamster

Distinguished


If Intel and Nvidia continue down the same path of efficiency (can't say the same thing about AMD atm) we will soon see high end pc's running off lower power psu's again.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ajiN9aVOv4A&list=WL&index=9
Check that out, you don't need a lot of watts for a decent high end system.
 

spdragoo

Splendid
Ambassador
Hmmm...this sounds more like the kind of PSU you would need for a quad-R9 290X bitcoin machine. Seriously 2000W?!?!? Yeah, sure, you won't hear any noise running most rigs....but only because you'll barely scratch maybe 30% of its load.

And...wow...at least $350 for a PSU, which would net them a top-end GPU instead. Yeah, I think I'll pass on this.
 

wtfxxxgp

Honorable
Nov 14, 2012
173
0
10,680
0
You won't ever hear this thing cool itself down because of your 4-way XFire rig trying to cool the GPUs. If it's Nvidia, it'll be RELATIVELY quiet. Beware if it's AMD stock cooling on high-end GPUs though... may as well house your PC in the basement cos it'll drive you bonkers with all the fan noise.
 

panders4

Distinguished
Oct 17, 2011
47
0
18,530
0
If you have a 15 amp circuit in the US, you wouldn't even be able to run this thing at max load without tripping the breaker...
 

aldaia

Distinguished
Oct 22, 2010
517
6
18,995
1
Saying is the worlds first 2000 W power supply (without any complement) is an overstatement. Maybe is the first ATX 2KW power supply, but 2000 W and even higher power supplies are common in rack servers. Examples:
Sun Microsystems 2400W REDUNDANT POWER SUPPLY (MSRP: $12,250)
Cisco WS-CAC-3000W Redundant Power Supply
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator

You do not need a 650W PSU to run most mainstream systems. A high quality 450W PSU would get the job done for 90-95% of people since the typical mainstream Intel+Maxwell gaming rig uses less than 300W peak.

The biggest problems are lower quality PSUs and poorly designed VRMs either on the motherboard or GPU spewing out excessive noise. Higher-capacity, higher-quality PSUs simply hide the symptoms of other components spewing garbage on the output rails better.

Also keep in mind that performance-oriented PCs have not had 250W PSUs in something like 18 years and even back then, the cheapest PSU I could get to put a P233MMX together out of spare parts was 300W. Today's mainstream performance PCs are 400-500X more powerful than what was available back then for maybe twice the peak power, which makes it a 200X improvement on performance per watt.

The increase in peak power is pretty mild compared to the increase in peak processing power.

Somewhere along the way, there was a time where mainstream-performance Intel CPUs used to use 125-135W, a time where high-end ATI/Nvidia GPUs used to use 300-450W with dual-GPU monsters blowing over 500W but today, mainstream Intel CPUs are under 80W typical and Nvidia's current high-end GPUs are under 200W nominal.

The days of out-of-control power envelopes seem to be history. GPUs are about to get a big boost from the 14-20nm shrinks, as are AMD's CPUs.
 

rluker5

Distinguished
Jun 23, 2014
60
7
18,535
0
I've got a 950w for an oc'd 4770k and 2 volt & bios modded 780ti's on air and it isn't enough. I get bad voltage droop and if I benchmark, I can flat out shut it down. (150w cpu, 375w per gpu and 50w for everything else? I've got a case fan at 39w)
I was seriously considering getting the excellent EVGA supernova 1300 G2, but if this comes out, the 1600 G2 price will drop due to being second best. This thing can't come out soon enough in the states. Awesome is better.
And yes, running a 12 gauge line for my pc is on the table.
 

Branden

Distinguished
Jan 22, 2009
598
0
19,060
39
if you were to have a computer capable of drawing 2000W, where would you plug it in? a typical household circuit is 15A (1800W), most homes only have one or two 20A circuits (in the kitchen if at all), and you can't just replace a 15A breaker with a 20A breaker because you'd likely also need to upgrade the circuit's wiring to be thicker (so you don't burn down the house pumping 2000W thru a 14 gauge wire)

have fun playing on your 2000W computer in the furnace room beside the electrical panel! (or at best on the kitchen counter while forgoing the use of a microwave)

 

nukemaster

Titan
Moderator

You are well above the average user here. Enthusiasts like your self make up a small portion of users, but are the reason why we have access to these monster power supplies.

Without the volt mod you should have been ok(would save about 200 watts across both cards.). You had to bypass the power monitor/limit on the card right?


I have to wonder if you can use both sides of the panel(double breaker) to get 240 volts(same way the stove and electric dryer or furnace do). This would reduce the current requirement(get you under 10 amps) so 14 gauge will handle it without issues again. You would clearly need a 240 volt plug to prevent issues like plugging something else into this 240 volt outlet.

All current power supplies run on 90-250 volts at least anyway and the efficiency is actually a hair higher at 240v in anyway from what i see.
 
I think they've done pretty well keeping the pc power usage in check. 900w and 1kw psu's have been around for quite a number of years. Cpu's and gpu's have made significant performance increases in the past 6-10yrs and the higher end cards like the r9 290x or the gtx 980 will both run comfortably with a 600-700w psu. Until they started making efficiency improvements, several years ago it looked as though single gpu systems were all going to require 1k psu's in short order.
 

none12345

Distinguished
Apr 27, 2013
431
2
18,785
0
"Am i the only one that thinks power usage in a PC is out of hand ? I mean .. in the past we were on a 250 W PSU.. now you need 650 W GOLD PSU to be sure your PC will run without issues .. and now we have 2KW PSU .. i hope in 10 years this won`t be standard PC requirement ... "

Nope, mabye in the past, but not anymore. There was a steady rise in the power requirements of a mid range system or upper end system until about 2009 or so. After that things have been going the other way.

Assuming for a moment we ignore sli/crossfire setups, or other dual chip configurations. And ignore mad overclocking... A high end graphics card is like 150-220 watts. High end cpu about 80-120 watts, rest of the system doesn't take that much. About 400 watts or so under full load. You dont want to load a psu to its max, or you will kill its life/stability/efficiency. So assuming 75%, and you come out to a 533. A 500-550 watt power supply is enough for high end single gpu.

Now if yous tart going multi GPU, and multi cpu, you start running up power fast. But even if you have 4 gpus, and 2 cpus, you are still under 1200 watts, and a 1500 watt power supply would be sufficient without excessive load.

I dont even see how you could load a 2000 watt power supply with 1 system. I cant add up 1500 watts worth of load in any possible single system desktop configuration. Unless there is a motherboard that can take like 8 gpus, and you can sli/crossfire 8 gpus, which i dont think you can.
 

none12345

Distinguished
Apr 27, 2013
431
2
18,785
0
"I have to wonder if you can use both sides of the panel(double breaker) to get 240 volts(same way the stove and electric dryer or furnace do). This would reduce the current requirement(get you under 10 amps) so 14 gauge will handle it without issues again. You would clearly need a 240 volt plug to prevent issues like plugging something else into this 240 volt outlet."

Yes you can. You can tap either leg to ground for 110-120 or you can tap leg to leg for 220-240. But you wouldn't just want to rewire an existing breaker in your panel. Technically speaking, its possible, assuming proper wiring, but its not smart. In the best case, this would violate electical codes. In the worst cast, you die. Next worst case, assuming inpropering wiring of your house, or you dont do it correctly, and you could fry lots of shit. Violating electrical codes would be an issue if you wanted to sell your house, and be an issue with insurance...

The way to do it is to add a new breaker on 240, and run a dedicated line to a proper 240v outlet. 240 is a lot more dangerous then 120. Call an electrician unless you know what you are doing.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator

In countries where they run single-ended phase at 220-250V, sure. In countries like the USA and Canada where it is center-tapped, you still have "only" 110-125V from tap to ground, which is how people get the vast majority of shocks regardless of whether they are working with 120V or 240V - you would have to be pretty reckless or unlucky to get a phase-to-phase shock with the full 240V.

One of the first things I have been taught about electricity is to never touch more than one wire at a time - as long as you remain isolated from everything else, even 1kV does little more than tickle.
 

Math Geek

Champion
Ambassador
"the R9 295X2 packs an awe-inspiring 500W TDP"

http://www.digitalstormonline.com/unlocked/4-way-quad-crossfire-amd-r9-295x2-benchmarks-at-4k-idnum228/

now i can finally beat this and do 4 x 295x2 for dual 4k monitors at 60+ fps!!! thank goodness this psu came along as i was starting to get bored with the dual 295x2's and single 4k screen. :D it'll run the 4 cards and i have an older psu that can run the rest of the system.

MORE POWER!!!!!!!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY