[SOLVED] SVID Best Case Scenario give me BSOD

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Hi.
I am kindda noob in CPU overclocking so I face a problem.
I bought a Core i9 9900k last week ( my motherboard is ASUS Z390-A Prime) and I change SVID setting to Best Case Scenario. I Know it gives CPU lower voltage. (Currect Me if i am wrong)
when SVID set to Best Case Scenario the Windows does not boot and gives me BSOD with Messages like:
WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR
DRIVE_OVERRAN_STACK_BUFFER
but when put it in Auto or Worst Case Scenario system boot with no error.
I don't know whats is wrong cause see people put it on best case scenario when they are overclocking ( I don't want to overclock just want to know why!!!)

somewhere I read that a high quality chip will ok with best case scenario. i9 9900k is not a high quality chip?? :/
 
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somewhere I read that a high quality chip will ok with best case scenario. i9 9900k is not a high quality chip?? :/

so it does not mean that my CPU in broken or something? I am kindda worried!
By high quality, they mean a really good sample. There are variations in the silicon wafers used to produce CPUs and that means not every 9900k is exactly the same. Some might be very good samples that can achieve high clocks at very low voltages, while others might need more voltage than average to achieve the same clockspeed. The default SVID values are usually a bit overly aggressive to ensure stability with every chip produced, which is why some board vendors offer reduced SVID settings you can try. There is no guarantee the reduced voltage will work at stock clocks though. Odds are you have an average to poor 9900k rather than a really good one that can run at reduced voltage.
 
It means your CPU isn't stable on the Best Case Scenario voltage the motherboard offers. Every chip is different, some can do stock clocks just fine on a reduced voltage, others can't. Overclockers use the Best Case Scenario setting because it allows for the lowest dynamic voltage when the chip isn't under load and they add an additional offset to get stability under heavier loads.
 

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It means your CPU isn't stable on the Best Case Scenario voltage the motherboard offers. Every chip is different, some can do stock clocks just fine on a reduced voltage, others can't. Overclockers use the Best Case Scenario setting because it allows for the lowest dynamic voltage when the chip isn't under load and they add an additional offset to get stability under heavier loads.
somewhere I read that a high quality chip will ok with best case scenario. i9 9900k is not a high quality chip?? :/

so it does not mean that my CPU in broken or something? I am kindda worried!
 
somewhere I read that a high quality chip will ok with best case scenario. i9 9900k is not a high quality chip?? :/

so it does not mean that my CPU in broken or something? I am kindda worried!
By high quality, they mean a really good sample. There are variations in the silicon wafers used to produce CPUs and that means not every 9900k is exactly the same. Some might be very good samples that can achieve high clocks at very low voltages, while others might need more voltage than average to achieve the same clockspeed. The default SVID values are usually a bit overly aggressive to ensure stability with every chip produced, which is why some board vendors offer reduced SVID settings you can try. There is no guarantee the reduced voltage will work at stock clocks though. Odds are you have an average to poor 9900k rather than a really good one that can run at reduced voltage.
 

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By high quality, they mean a really good sample. There are variations in the silicon wafers used to produce CPUs and that means not every 9900k is exactly the same. Some might be very good samples that can achieve high clocks at very low voltages, while others might need more voltage than average to achieve the same clockspeed. The default SVID values are usually a bit overly aggressive to ensure stability with every chip produced, which is why some board vendors offer reduced SVID settings you can try. There is no guarantee the reduced voltage will work at stock clocks though. Odds are you have an average to poor 9900k rather than a really good one that can run at reduced voltage.
didn't understand this sentence can u say it again in another word?

"Odds are you have an average to poor 9900k rather than a really good one that can run at reduced voltage. "
 

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I tested now that typical scenario give me BSOD after 15 min of running small game (minecraft).
worst case scenario is ok though!
 
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didn't understand this sentence can u say it again in another word?

"Odds are you have an average to poor 9900k rather than a really good one that can run at reduced voltage. "
If you are running into stability problems at stock speed on everything except the Worst Case Scenario SVID setting, then you probably just have a poor sample of the 9900k. If you don't plan on seriously overclocking then it isn't a huge deal.

No two CPUs are the same and there is variation in silicon quality between them. It's up to luck of the draw how good a sample your CPU is. It's called the silicon lottery and often how well you do in it dictates how far you can overclock your chip.
 

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If you are running into stability problems at stock speed on everything except the Worst Case Scenario SVID setting, then you probably just have a poor sample of the 9900k. If you don't plan on seriously overclocking then it isn't a huge deal.

No two CPUs are the same and there is variation in silicon quality between them. It's up to luck of the draw how good a sample your CPU is. It's called the silicon lottery and often how well you do in it dictates how far you can overclock your chip.
So you said everything is OK if I don't want to overclock CPU it's fine? for my CPU Upto 5GHz?
 
So you said everything is OK if I don't want to overclock CPU it's fine? for my CPU Upto 5GHz?
It's fine for stock operation, if you want 5GHz on all cores you might have some trouble keeping temperatures under control as your chip may need a lot of voltage to get that stable. You'd have to do some stress testing at different voltages at 5GHz all core to figure out what voltage you need and if it's possible to keep the CPU from overheating at that voltage with whatever cooler you have.
 

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It's fine for stock operation, if you want 5GHz on all cores you might have some trouble keeping temperatures under control as your chip may need a lot of voltage to get that stable. You'd have to do some stress testing at different voltages at 5GHz all core to figure out what voltage you need and if it's possible to keep the CPU from overheating at that voltage with whatever cooler you have.
Thanks A lot!
I mean that 5 Ghz for One Core and 4.7 for All Cores ( i9 9900k Stock Spec). is this ok?
 

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Yes, the CPU should run at the stock speed with boost. If it's crashing doing that regardless of voltage, then you probably have a defective chip.
The reason why I wanted to know about SVID is that in Prime95 Test When Start testing the system in Min FFT size for max Power and heat cores get low to 4.5 GHz but in Cinebench everything is Ok (I read is something about AVX. I dont know what is exactly) is this releate to the silicon lottery ?
 
The reason why I wanted to know about SVID is that in Prime95 Test When Start testing the system in Min FFT size for max Power and heat cores get low to 4.5 GHz but in Cinebench everything is Ok (I read is something about AVX. I dont know what is exactly) is this releate to the silicon lottery ?
No that's more related to power limits. Cinebench is a short test so your Turbo clocks usually won't go down, but Prime95 is a longer test and eventually you'll hit a time limit on TurboBoost and the CPU will drop down to a lower power level and drop clocks closer to base clock. Some motherboard vendors do allow you to disable these Turbo limits and run at maximum Turbo clocks for as long as you want, but that is outside Intel spec and will significantly increase power draw and heat output.
 
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