[SOLVED] Swap out Z270E for more modern board?

Mar 8, 2022
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I'm not a hardware guy, although I assembled a few machines 20 years ago.

Typically, how compatible are newer ASUS motherboards with older ones? What's the likelihood that a new board will be mountable, whether it's an ASUS or other?

Is it possible to purchase just a board, CPU, and memory, installing Windows from scratch on a reformatted SSD? Are there online vendors who will sell a bundle consisting of board, RAM, and CPU, assuring me that they're matched and will work with my case and power supply?

I love my current machine (from Puget Systems). It's a a bit over-designed for my software development work, so whatever board I replace it with doesn't need to be top-of the line.
  • Z270E
  • Intel Core i7 7700K 4.2GHz Quad Core 8MB 91W
  • 2x Crucial DDR4-2400 (?) 16 gigs
  • EVGA SuperNOVA 550W G2 Power Supply
  • Cooling: Noctua NH-U12S
  • Asus 24x DVD-RW SATA (Black)
  • Samsung SSD 850 EVO 1TB
  • Case: Fractal Design Arc Midi R2 w/ Window
 

tennis2

Judicious
Motherboard form factors (size, mounting hole locations, power connection) haven't changed in eons. (the exception being some custom OEM boards from the likes of Dell/HP/Lenovo).

You can absolutely replace your mobo+CPU whilst keeping everything else.

For compatibility, a given mobo chipset (ie Z270, no matter the brand) will have a list of supported CPUs. Intel 600 series mobos (Intel 12th gen CPUs) support DDR4 or DDR5 RAM, but not both, so read the specs on the board you choose. AMD hasn't transitioned to DDR5 yet.

Otherwise, sites like pcpartpicker are helpful as well.
 
Reactions: TedFine1998

tennis2

Judicious
Motherboard form factors (size, mounting hole locations, power connection) haven't changed in eons. (the exception being some custom OEM boards from the likes of Dell/HP/Lenovo).

You can absolutely replace your mobo+CPU whilst keeping everything else.

For compatibility, a given mobo chipset (ie Z270, no matter the brand) will have a list of supported CPUs. Intel 600 series mobos (Intel 12th gen CPUs) support DDR4 or DDR5 RAM, but not both, so read the specs on the board you choose. AMD hasn't transitioned to DDR5 yet.

Otherwise, sites like pcpartpicker are helpful as well.
 
Reactions: TedFine1998
The Puget system is likely all "industry standard" parts, so you should be able to replace only certain parts within it...

For a major rebuild, that would be motherboard and CPU at a minimum.

RAM would be optional...your current DDR4 will likely work OK, but there is some possibility of it not being compatible with a new motherboard.

Power supply should be fine, barring any aging issues.

I don't see a video card in your list, so assume you are using integrated video off the 7700K.

Noctua U12S still a good choice, but you would have to get an adapter to install it on a current motherboard. Available from Noctua at no charge or you can buy it from standard sources for 10 bucks or so.

DVD and SSD should be OK. You might want to get a new M.2 2280 drive to replace the Samsung to "stay up with the times" and be among the cool kids, but you wouldn't likely notice a performance difference.

If you want to stay with Intel, standard advice would be a B660 motherboard and an i-5 12400.....you can always step up the CPU if budget says OK.

You'd likely have to buy the parts individually rather than as a pre-assembled unit.
 
Mar 8, 2022
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Why exactly are you considering change of motherboard then?
Exellent question, SkyNetRising!

I'm trying to plan ahead for when Windows 11 becomes compelling, which from what I'm hearing now may be several years from now. So, yes, I'm a bit early to be doing this research.

This motherboard is not Windows 11 compatible, so I thought I'd look into what I should expect.

Tom
 
I'm trying to plan ahead for when Windows 11 becomes compelling, which from what I'm hearing now may be several years from now.
By the time windows 10 support ends there will be better, less expensive, more modern hardware available.
So - if you upgrade now and only reason is, to have windows 11 support, then in several years you may want to upgrade again for some other compatibility/feature/technology/whatever.

Upgrade only, if (and when) you absolutely need it.
 
Reactions: TedFine1998
Mar 8, 2022
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By the time windows 10 support ends there will be better, less expensive, more modern hardware available.
So - if you upgrade now and only reason is, to have windows 11 support, then in several years you may want to upgrade again for some other compatibility/feature/technology/whatever.

Upgrade only, if (and when) you absolutely need it.
Excellent advice. It was only after I did the original post to this thread that I learned how far off Windows 11 really is.

I appreciate, SkyNetRising, your and others help to me and so many others where. I'm impressed at how quick, numerous, and informed the replies were. :)
 

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