[SOLVED] Switched from Intel to AMD, need help with setup

Sep 27, 2020
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Recently I swapped from intel to AMD, which required me to buy a new CPU and motherboard. I never knew that i would need to re install windows when switching these, which is my own fault, but I'd like to know if there is a way to keep my files and programs without having to completely re format all of my drives and lose everything.
 
Recently I swapped from intel to AMD, which required me to buy a new CPU and motherboard. I never knew that i would need to re install windows when switching these, which is my own fault, but I'd like to know if there is a way to keep my files and programs without having to completely re format all of my drives and lose everything.
You can TRY a repair install with in-place upgrade...instructions for doing it are found here. It will save all settings, installed apps and files but do make backups of user files and account passwords BEFORE you take the old system apart to be safe. If it doesn't work out you'll be doing a clean install anyway so having those all backed up will make it a lot easier on you.

I've used it to repair several thoroughly messed up windows installations and operated them. Some of them had strange problems...mostly with sleep (it wouldn't) and hibernate (it wouldn't come back from hibernation). But a few Windows semi-annual updates later things got back to normal.

Oh yes: and if you haven't yet set up a Microsoft account, use it as your logon and convert your windows license to a digital license tied to that account. It will make it easier to validate on the new system so long as you use it as your logon on it too.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Hellfire13
Recently I swapped from intel to AMD, which required me to buy a new CPU and motherboard. I never knew that i would need to re install windows when switching these, which is my own fault, but I'd like to know if there is a way to keep my files and programs without having to completely re format all of my drives and lose everything.
You can TRY a repair install with in-place upgrade...instructions for doing it are found here. It will save all settings, installed apps and files but do make backups of user files and account passwords BEFORE you take the old system apart to be safe. If it doesn't work out you'll be doing a clean install anyway so having those all backed up will make it a lot easier on you.

I've used it to repair several thoroughly messed up windows installations and operated them. Some of them had strange problems...mostly with sleep (it wouldn't) and hibernate (it wouldn't come back from hibernation). But a few Windows semi-annual updates later things got back to normal.

Oh yes: and if you haven't yet set up a Microsoft account, use it as your logon and convert your windows license to a digital license tied to that account. It will make it easier to validate on the new system so long as you use it as your logon on it too.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Hellfire13
Apr 7, 2020
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No you don't need to reinstall anything. I just switched from Intel E3 1230 V3 to AMD R5 3600 less than a month ago, switching platform+generational upgrade, it was just plug and play, and my hard drive was cloned from my old hard drive, on which the operating system was upgraded from Win7 to Win10 when it was free.

As Linus said, Windows 10 is smart enough to handle it, it just goes: "ehhhhh.... okay?" and then set basically everything right. If you are asked to reinstall windows, you probably checked a wrong box somewhere when Windows was trying to fix things.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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No you don't need to reinstall anything. I just switched from Intel E3 1230 V3 to AMD R5 3600 less than a month ago, switching platform+generational upgrade, it was just plug and play, and my hard drive was cloned from my old hard drive, on which the operating system was upgraded from Win7 to Win10 when it was free.

As Linus said, Windows 10 is smart enough to handle it, it just goes: "ehhhhh.... okay?" and then set basically everything right. If you are asked to reinstall windows, you probably checked a wrong box somewhere when Windows was trying to fix things.
Yep, it "just works".
Except for all the times it fails.

As is asked and answered here multiple times a day...

There are 3 possible outcomes:
  1. It boots up just fine.
  2. It fails completely
  3. It boots up, but you're chasing issues for weeks/months.
I've seen all 3.

Anyone who says it always works simply hasn't done it enough times to see it fail.

Win 10 is much better than previous version. But by no means 100% guaranteed to work. No matter what Linus and his team says.

And it's NOT a matter of "checked a wrong box somewhere". It never asks you to reinstall. Rather...the thing never boots up.



Before the new hardware, prepare for a full reinstall. OS and everything else.
Then, if you're brave....try the old drive and OS in the new hardware. It might work.
But if it fails, you'll be prepared, and won't be fretting about losing your personal files.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
147,451
9,350
175,390
23,026
Recently I swapped from intel to AMD, which required me to buy a new CPU and motherboard. I never knew that i would need to re install windows when switching these, which is my own fault, but I'd like to know if there is a way to keep my files and programs without having to completely re format all of my drives and lose everything.
Did you already swap the hardware and try to boot up?
 

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