Question Switching from ryzen to intel

Feb 20, 2019
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So I decided to upgrade from a r5 2600x to an I7 8700k I understand that with you a big hardware switch you should re install windows and in most cases back all your data up, but installed to my friend who switched from intel to ryzen and he didn’t have to do anything to his pc it booted right into windows fine, anyway my main concern is what amd drivers should I uninstall before i install my new cpu?
 

Mandark

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Sep 13, 2002
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How can you go from an Intel platform to an AMD platform or vice a versa without having to install windows? They have completely different chipsets and motherboard and CPU. I don’t believe that your friend was able to do this and I am sure you won’t be able to either
 
Feb 20, 2019
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How can you go from an Intel platform to an AMD platform or vice a versa without having to install windows? They have completely different chipsets and motherboard and CPU. I don’t believe that your friend was able to do this and I am sure you won’t be able
How can you go from an Intel platform to an AMD platform or vice a versa without having to install windows? They have completely different chipsets and motherboard and CPU. I don’t believe that your friend was able to do this and I am sure you won’t be able to either
I was there when he did it he went from an i5 7600k to an r7 2700x his pc booted up fine all he had to do was enter in his product code again but the OS itself was still there , when windows detects a mass hardware upgrade it the os re installs itself but it explains why he had to enter the product code in a agin because windows had to reinstall, I would just like to know if I have to uninstall ryzen master and other and drivers etc...
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
It can be done. It simply means the registry hits a ton of dead ends and prolongs boot, there's often very little conflict. With same name platform changes, you'll run into the same drivers names but addresses will be wrong, versions wrong, serious conflicts at times creating loops etc, so it's best if the drivers folder is completely reset, registry reset etc which is what happens with a OS reinstall. Many times it's add-on software in the registry is looking for particular drivers and addresses in order to function correctly, and not finding them, goes nuts. Reinstalling all that software resets the correct links.

Sometimes platform swaps work with no issues, most times they do not. And immediate working state often happens but later use of software can show errors.
 
Reactions: ChunkyCheese
Not much of an upgrade, is it really worth the money?
A 2700x is no more than 10% slower than 8700k in some benchmarks and AMD is faster in others
All this for a few dollars, compared to a new motherboard and an cpu that's not really made anymore.
You would be paying twice the price for a max increase of 10% but generally a lot less.
Although it is your money of course and you can waste it if you wish

https://www.techspot.com/review/1655-core-i7-8700k-vs-ryzen-7-2700x/page8.html

once you go over 1080 gaming it's really neglible.
 
Reactions: Mandark
Feb 20, 2019
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It can be done. It simply means the registry hits a ton of dead ends and prolongs boot, there's often very little conflict. With same name platform changes, you'll run into the same drivers names but addresses will be wrong, versions wrong, serious conflicts at times creating loops etc, so it's best if the drivers folder is completely reset, registry reset etc which is what happens with a OS reinstall. Many times it's add-on software in the registry is looking for particular drivers and addresses in order to function correctly, and not finding them, goes nuts. Reinstalling all that software resets the correct links.

Sometimes platform swaps work with no issues, most times they do not. And immediate working state often happens but later use of software can show errors.
Ok so let’s say I would have to re install my os I know I’d have to back my hard drive up but to re install the os would I just wipe my hard drive to get rid of the old os that would be configured for my current chipset then I install the new mobo and cpu and re install windows and re enter the product key ?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
You can reinstall windows in 2 ways. An overlay that basically resets windows to like new, wipes out everything that's in any stock folder (like documents, drivers etc) but doesn't touch non-stock folders, or a complete full reinstall. The full reinstall will partition your drive as it needs to for backup etc so any and all data on the drive is now no longer accessible. Then windows will simply start a fresh install automatically on a theoretically fresh drive. The overlay works, but still requires full reinstall of all extra software and if there's anything like malware hiding in non-stock folders, it's still going to be there. Best to just make a backup of anything like pics/music/documents/game save files etc that are not software, then full, fresh install.
 
Jan 23, 2019
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So I decided to upgrade from a r5 2600x to an I7 8700k I understand that with you a big hardware switch you should re install windows and in most cases back all your data up, but installed to my friend who switched from intel to ryzen and he didn’t have to do anything to his pc it booted right into windows fine, anyway my main concern is what amd drivers should I uninstall before i install my new cpu?
In that case why not upgrade to a 3rd Gen Ryzen CPU and save money when they come out this year lols. The prototypes have already crushed the i9 9900K in Cenabench.
 
Not much of an upgrade, is it really worth the money?
A 2700x is no more than 10% slower than 8700k in some benchmarks and AMD is faster in others
All this for a few dollars, compared to a new motherboard and an cpu that's not really made anymore.
You would be paying twice the price for a max increase of 10% but generally a lot less.
Although it is your money of course and you can waste it if you wish

https://www.techspot.com/review/1655-core-i7-8700k-vs-ryzen-7-2700x/page8.html

once you go over 1080 gaming it's really neglible.
So you say one thing but then link to a page that says up to 52% difference(but we will not count this because we like amd) so up to 29% difference in primal,overwatch,wreckfest...
30% difference is enough for someone to consider upgrading.
 
Reactions: ChunkyCheese
I would assume that almost no one is running 720p resolution on a 1080 Ti. : P

And if you actually look at the frame rates there, the Ryzen 2700X averages 550 fps at that resolution in CS:GO, while the 8700K averages 836 fps. So sure, the 8700K is 52% faster at 720p in that game, but even the minimums were above what a 144 or 165 Hz gaming screen can display, so it's unlikely those extra frames would make any appreciable difference.

And realistically, most people would be running a 1080 Ti at 1440p resolution or higher, where the only other game to see a big performance difference was Starcraft II, another somewhat older, single-threaded game. And with a less high-end graphics card than that, you would likely see performance differences more like those 1440p numbers at 1080p, or less still, depending on the card. Unless one has a rather high-end graphics card relative to the resolution they are running, along with a high refresh rate screen, the merits of going with a high-end CPU are questionable.

In any case, it sounds like they already bought the hardware, and it is an upgrade over what they had. I would have to agree that waiting a few months to see what the 7nm Ryzen CPUs have offer might have been worthwhile though, at least from a cost perspective.
 

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