[SOLVED] System appraisal required prior to selling

HALIFAX3

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Apr 24, 2019
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Hello, I just need a quick appraisal on my system that I’m trying to sell. What do you think is a fair price.
My specs are the following.

Ryzen 2200G
8GB Ram @ 3200mhz
500GB m.2 storage
Asrock B450 fatality mini itx w/ wifi
550 watt bronze rated PSU
Cooler master elite 110 case

Thanks.
 

Eximo

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I thought all m.2’s were NVME but yes this one happens to be as well.
M.2 is a form factor. PCIe for NVMe and mSATA are the other common type. The other standards have mostly gone away.

M, B, and B + M (PCIe and mSATA) are the standouts in the consumer space. Pretty much all motherboards use B+M so they support both drive types. Older systems with M.2 Wifi cards may be the Mini PCIe standard, which is only two lanes.
 

punkncat

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I tend to agree with the ~$250 mark.
The motherboard is a decent one that will allow for 5000 Ryzen with a BIOS update. The M.2 is ample sized and possibly desirable if an NVME. The rest of the system appears run of the mill but the bones offer a decent upgrade path.
 

Karadjgne

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I'd say closer to the $300 point. Maybe. MITX parts are not cheap, compared to standard ATX.

Most mITX users are looking not just for cool, but quiet, it's something that's going to sit right next to the monitor, and it's not built to be a gaming pc, yet. So it'd need to be silent under a decent load. Which is also a selling point.
 

Eximo

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I thought all m.2’s were NVME but yes this one happens to be as well.
M.2 is a form factor. PCIe for NVMe and mSATA are the other common type. The other standards have mostly gone away.

M, B, and B + M (PCIe and mSATA) are the standouts in the consumer space. Pretty much all motherboards use B+M so they support both drive types. Older systems with M.2 Wifi cards may be the Mini PCIe standard, which is only two lanes.
 

geofelt

Titan
A fair price is whatever a buyer is willing to pay for.
One place to look is ebay. Find your individual parts in used condition.
Then filter on completed auctions.
In green, you will see what the parts actually sold for.
Sometimes, you will get more if you sold individual parts.
A buyer may not want exactly the combo you are selling.
If you can, sell locally.
Shipping of a case can be expensive, even an ITX case.

If you are looking at a stronger pc, perhaps you can reuse some of your parts.
 
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punkncat

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If you can, sell locally.
Shipping of a case can be expensive, even an ITX case.

The last mITX case I sold was a Lian Li with a "server" style 3.5" x5 rack. We packaged it for bomb proof, cost me just around $70 to go a couple of states over. When it got there the user and I had to come to an agreement because several of the HDD didn't make the journey, in spite of being packaged in their own bubble pouch. Solid State are impervious to that aspect, so is a plus.
 

HALIFAX3

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Apr 24, 2019
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Thank you for the clarification on NVME. So taking everyone’s recommendations into account, between $300-$275 would be a fair asking price. Correct?
 

geofelt

Titan
Thank you for the clarification on NVME. So taking everyone’s recommendations into account, between $300-$275 would be a fair asking price. Correct?
Any prospective buyer is going to want to negotiate.
Sum up all of the replacement costs as justification for the asking price and take 20% off.

Ask for more than you think you can get and plan to negotiate.
 

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