[SOLVED] System stops responding after a hit on the case

Jul 12, 2021
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my system has stopped responding after the case took a bump, a kid threw a toy at the case and it literally the cursor stopped moving around, i had to hard reboot and it worked fine, did that damage anything? what was that from? and what do i do to avoid this next time? because you know, kids. and thanks.
 
Jul 12, 2021
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Small possibility of physical damage.
Possible data corruption.

No way to really tell.
The data is just fine and everything seems normal. can you tell me what could possibly be damaged? even if its a very low percent happened. because i was planning to dump my cpu and motherboard anyway. or was it the gpu that might've been damaged in this process? :(
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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The data is just fine and everything seems normal. can you tell me what could possibly be damaged? even if its a very low percent happened. because i was planning to dump my cpu and motherboard anyway. or was it the gpu that might've been damaged in this process? :(
It is literally impossible to tell, until you see something not working.

A short term transient disconnect could have (highly unlikely) introduced some weird voltage into some part. Any part.
 
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Jul 12, 2021
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sorry i keep asking, but would that affect any part in the long term in performance or lifespan? or is it something that can be left behind?
 

Demorthus

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Hi OP, I can tell you from experience than what most likely ended up happening was that while the hard drive was spinning, the sudden jolt/bump caused the platters to move outside of their specified are of "tolerance" (All HDDs have a varying degree of how much vibration they can withstand during normal operation). I'd recommend using something such as HWiNFO64 or CrystalDiskInfo, if there's any errors there'll be a warning from the S.M.A.R.T. column respectively. Overtime a hard drive will naturally reach a point of no return, and sometimes given the environment it can happen pre-maturely; such as during unintended accidents like operating during hot temperatures or significant vibrations.

The easiest way to avoid this is to use an SSD. Unlike a HDD they have no moving parts, making them fast & tolerant to lots of physical abuse (lol). Also, in the event of a failure it's easier to recover data off of flash than it is from a HDD that's deteriorated or been physically damaged.

The usual applies if you walked in and stuff stopped working, check nothing came loose or undone, etc. Don't overstress it :)
 

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