Question System won't post after overclock

gpole87

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Jul 30, 2018
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I overclocked my i5-12600k to 5.0ghz at 1.28v ( I also had it stable at 5.2ghz but backed down as it needed 1.4v and my cooler couldn't keep up ) and it was running perfectly peaking at around 85C during benchmarks, however today whilst using the pc it suddenly turned off and now won't post. Im assuming I've broken something as I've already tried clearing the CMOS etc and no luck but I'm not sure if its the cpu or the motherboard. The cpu at the time was only at about 20-40% and was not very hot so I'm wondering if its the vrms on the motherboard? Under full load it wasn't going much past 130w so I don't think its a PSU issue.
Any ideas would be much appreciated.

System Specs:
I5-12600kf
MSI Pro Z690-P DDR4
16GB DDR4
RTX 3060
550w Corsair PSU
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
550w Corsair PSU
Corsair is the brand of the PSU, while 550W is the advertised wattage of the unit. What is the model for your unit? If overclocking was in the back of your mind with your build, you should've looked into a higher wattage PSU...ontop of the wattage that is suggested due to the transient load spikes of an RTX3060.

I've already tried clearing the CMOS
How did you clear the CMOS?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What cooler are you running?

What case and case fan configuration?

Did you clear CMOS using the jumper pins or did you do the following? If you did not do the following, then it would be advisable to do so.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
 

gpole87

Reputable
Jul 30, 2018
16
0
4,510
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550w Corsair PSU
Corsair is the brand of the PSU, while 550W is the advertised wattage of the unit. What is the model for your unit? If overclocking was in the back of your mind with your build, you should've looked into a higher wattage PSU...ontop of the wattage that is suggested due to the transient load spikes of an RTX3060.

I've already tried clearing the CMOS
How did you clear the CMOS?
It’s a corsair vs550, which i know isn’t the best but i wasn’t using the pc intensively so it shouldn’t have been pulling too much power. I cleared the cmos by pulling the battery and waiting 10 mins and pressing the power button for about 15 seconds
 

gpole87

Reputable
Jul 30, 2018
16
0
4,510
0
What cooler are you running?

What case and case fan configuration?

Did you clear CMOS using the jumper pins or did you do the following? If you did not do the following, then it would be advisable to do so.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.
I tried both just in case but still nothing
I have an Arctic Freezer 33 esports duo which claims cooling for up to 210w
I have 2 case fans inside a next h510 flow
 
Last edited:

gpole87

Reputable
Jul 30, 2018
16
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4,510
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The VS series is pretty terrible. I would not be surprised if it was the problem, but it could definitely be something else.

Does it power on, is there any display at all?
nothing but a red light by the cpu, i’m switching back to my old mobo/cpu for now so if it’s psu related i will find that out but still won’t know if it’s the cpu or motherboard as i have to swap both
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
How will that tell you if it's PSU or CPU? You'd have the same problem no matter how many motherboards you tried unless the problem was the motherboard. It certainly won't tell you if it's the PSU or the CPU if you swap motherboards.

I've probably participated in no less than 150 threads on this forum alone, where a VS series PSU was the issue. Even on VS units that were brand new out of the box. So any problem I see on a system with a VS or CS series power supply is generally assumed to be a power supply issue until proven otherwise, IMO. No way to even really look at other potential issues without knowing for certain you have a reliable, decent quality power supply installed since the PSU can make it look like ANY other component. Nothing works right when the PSU doesn't work right and yes, there are varying levels of problems that PSU can cause most of which are NOT simply "no power".
 

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