Build Advice Targeted PC for Audio and Video Manipulation

versionmanager

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Dec 19, 2016
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I have a Dell Desktop purchased around 2014 for Home use with an emphasis on video and audio manipulation. I use Photoshop for doing work on digital pictures. I also use Cyberlink Power Director for video.

I would like to upgrade by either buying another PC and adding on memory, sound card and HDs. If a prebuilt machine is out there with enough capability, that would even be better.
Partial specs of current PC just to give and idea:

2014 Dell XPS Desktop (Refurb from Fry's)
  • Intel i7 -6700 CPU
  • 3.4 GHZ
  • NVIDIA Geoforce 750i
  • 64 GB of Corsair RAM
  • Windows 10 Home
  • SSD for OS
  • Partitioned 1 TB WD hard drive for data
I use machines then donate them after about 5 years. I don't really have the time to build a PC from the 'ground floor' but am willing to invest/integrate in components that are of value like a beefier CPU, more top shelf RAM and of course a 'powerhouse' GPU.

I would like the rig to be around $800 or less. Run Windows 10 (current copy if needed). If this price is too cheap, please advise. Can I buy this already prebuilt or buy the foundation and add the parts? If I build, what suggestions do you have for CPU vendor and model, GPU speed, vendor and model and RAM to include PIN specs, brand and vendor.

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
The point to be made with prebuilts and DIY builds is that DIY system's give you the advantage of choosing what you want. Prebuilts often have to cut corner in order for the brand to make a profit. This can be in the form of a generic chassis, a limited storage option, limited slots on the board.

I'd ask to buy parts, build from the ground up and then upgrade. You could retain the system after 5 years but I think in that time frame you'll recoup the money spent on it with your work(assuming you upload and earn through your content) to which the system can be donated and you build another from the ground up but retain the storage drives.

Thumb rule we have is that a case should last you 4 build, at best. If the PSU is reliably built you can retain that for build after build and if it dies, it'll die quietly without killing other components.

Preferred site for purchase? Would PCPartPicker be good with you? Also, what would you want in that price point? The innards and the chassis or does that need to include the monitor, keyboard and mouse? Essentially everything that was asked here.
 

versionmanager

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Dec 19, 2016
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The resource link you offered as a guide is outstanding. I have a question though. Do you have to be careful buying electrical components that bolt onto a Motherboard? I look at the kinds of problems that show up on forums about overheating, power supply problems, etc.

Is there any kind of product support to help diagnose issues on these custom built machines and is that support easily accessible and affordable? Thanks in advance.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
The resource link you offered as a guide is outstanding. I have a question though. Do you have to be careful buying electrical components that bolt onto a Motherboard? I look at the kinds of problems that show up on forums about overheating, power supply problems, etc.

Is there any kind of product support to help diagnose issues on these custom built machines and is that support easily accessible and affordable? Thanks in advance.
Not sure what you mean exactly about careful, you should keep to known good quality parts to minimize issues and of course installing and learning what hardware is supported is important to know. For support for computers, either start learning things yourself (won't take too long) or ask questions on forums like this one, or find a local computer shop and find out what they charge. Or find some online classes or videos about things you are curious about. The internet has all the information you can possibly need to learn enough to even get a professional job in almost any topic you can think of, want to learn to cut hair, plenty of videos, want to learn to cook, same thing, want to learn how to build a computer, ditto, and so on.
 

versionmanager

Reputable
Dec 19, 2016
128
3
4,595
1
Not sure what you mean exactly about careful, you should keep to known good quality parts to minimize issues and of course installing and learning what hardware is supported is important to know. For support for computers, either start learning things yourself (won't take too long) or ask questions on forums like this one, or find a local computer shop and find out what they charge. Or find some online classes or videos about things you are curious about. The internet has all the information you can possibly need to learn enough to even get a professional job in almost any topic you can think of, want to learn to cut hair, plenty of videos, want to learn to cook, same thing, want to learn how to build a computer, ditto, and so on.
I just go to this. Thank you for the encouragement.
 

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