TDK Develops Tech to "More Than Double" HDD Capacity

Status
Not open for further replies.

Haserath

Distinguished
Apr 13, 2010
1,377
0
19,360
45
A mistake in the subtitle and the first paragraph. All are GB instead of TB. I'll never go above single platter drives, so it's nice to have 1TB single platter. Always nice to see storage increases of double or more per year.
 

sonofhendrix

Distinguished
Jul 16, 2008
46
0
18,530
0
Time for Wide Quad High Definition (WQHD) (2560×1440) movies!
And PCs with 2560x1440 display monitors will be the first platforms for it.
And now we have the disc space to store or record them.
 

bourgeoisdude

Distinguished
Dec 15, 2005
1,216
1
19,290
1
8GB.

I would email the editor, but apparently Tom's doesn't have any. I usually give you guys a break on stuff like this, but this error is too ridiculously obvious.
 

drwho1

Distinguished
Jan 10, 2010
1,272
0
19,310
15
I was planning on getting some 4TB drives probably next year... it looks that I will wait now for this 8TB to reach the consumer market.

I bet that they will be a bit pricey at first but give it a year or so and they will be at a good price range -$100-$160- good price point for my movies and TV shows collection.
 

gokanis

Distinguished
Apr 26, 2011
233
0
18,690
1
[citation][nom]dontknownotsure[/nom]I want to see a zettabyte in my lifetime. It is equal to a trillion gigabytes[/citation]

I'm holding out for a Yottabyte holographic USB key.
 

rosen380

Distinguished
Mar 17, 2011
422
0
18,780
0
"I want to see a zettabyte in my lifetime. It is equal to a trillion gigabytes"

Why? Just picking out a really big number?? If a BluRay quality movie takes up around 50GB and a DVD around 4GB. Lets each movie storage type is a similar 12.5x jump and occur every 15 years.

Right now a 4TB drive will hold about 80 bluRay movies; it'll take seven new generations of movie formats and over 100 years before a 1 "zettabyte" drive is required to store the same number of movies.

Even for industrial and scientific uses, we're only up to like millions of gigabytes of necessary storage, so we're probably still a long ways off needing a million times more than that.

I'm pretty sure that nearly every sensible computer user would trade a 1,000,000,000x increase in capacity for 100x increase in performance [IE 1TB that is faster than RAM rather than 1 zettabyte at current speeds...
 

CaedenV

Splendid
[citation][nom]rosen380[/nom]"I want to see a zettabyte in my lifetime. It is equal to a trillion gigabytes"Why? Just picking out a really big number?? If a BluRay quality movie takes up around 50GB and a DVD around 4GB. Lets each movie storage type is a similar 12.5x jump and occur every 15 years.Right now a 4TB drive will hold about 80 bluRay movies; it'll take seven new generations of movie formats and over 100 years before a 1 "zettabyte" drive is required to store the same number of movies.Even for industrial and scientific uses, we're only up to like millions of gigabytes of necessary storage, so we're probably still a long ways off needing a million times more than that.I'm pretty sure that nearly every sensible computer user would trade a 1,000,000,000x increase in capacity for 100x increase in performance [IE 1TB that is faster than RAM rather than 1 zettabyte at current speeds...[/citation]
Welcome to technology where things move in logrithmic accelerating fassion. It took FOREVER to get to 1GB drives, and took much less time to get to 1TB. I would imagine it would take less time to get to 1PB/1ZB/1YB unless we run into hard physical limits, or the world economy tanks entirely and we all go back to the stone age. And by the time we get to the 1PB range we will have to move on to something more creative for storage (like holographic storage, or running away from binary and going to a base 3+ system where we can store much more dense amounts of information).
Again, not saying that we will see it in our lifetimes, but our kids might. Then again if Kurzweil has his way then maybe we would see it :)

[citation][nom]billybobser[/nom]Bit underwhelming compared to the 1024GB ram sticks I see on ebay.[/citation]
Oh man, I laughed so hard! You can find anything on e-Bay lol
 

rosen380

Distinguished
Mar 17, 2011
422
0
18,780
0
"Welcome to technology where things move in logrithmic accelerating fassion."

Since when?

According to Wikipedia:
2005 - First 500 GB hard drive shipping (Hitachi GST)
2006 - First 750 GB hard drive (Seagate)
2007 - First 1 terabyte hard drive[14] (Hitachi GST)
2008 - First 1.5 terabyte hard drive[15] (Seagate)
2009 - First 2.0 terabyte hard drive[16] (Western Digital)
2010 - First 3.0 terabyte hard drive[17][18] (Seagate, Western Digital)
2011 - First 4.0 terabyte hard drive[20] (Seagate)

That is hardly 'logarithmic'.
2005-2006 +50%
2006-2007 +33%
2007-2008 +50%
2008-2009 +33%
2009-2010 +50%
2010-2011 +33%

Pretty linear. Do it in two year batches instead:
2005-2007 +100%
2006-2008 +100%
2007-2009 +100%
2008-2010 +100%
2009-2011 +100%
Perfectly linear!

So, given that:
2013 8TB
2015 16TB
2017 32TB
2019 64TB
2021 128TB
2023 250TB
2025 500TB
... etc, decades until something like zettabytes.

Not to mention that at some point in the relatively near future, people are probably going to be ditching spinning drives for SSD for performance. At that point, lets say in six years, the capacity will dial back a bit, since SSDs are way behind spinning drives, adding a number of cycles.




 

AerieC

Distinguished
Aug 20, 2009
27
0
18,530
0
[citation][nom]rosen380[/nom]"Welcome to technology where things move in logrithmic accelerating fassion."Since when?[/citation]

I think you're confused about the meaning of linear vs exponential growth. And the growth is assuredly exponential.

Linear growth would be if it grew by the same fixed NUMBER (not percentage) every x number of years.

For example: If the storage capacity in 2005 was 500GB, and in 2007 it was 1TB, in another two years, it would be 1.5TB, another 2 years 2TB, and so on (growing by a fixed 500GB every two years).

Instead, the storage capacity is DOULBING every two years. 500GB in 2005, 1TB in 2007, 2TB in 2009, 4TB in 2011.

Linear = flat rate growth, Exponential = growth that changes in rate.

Sure it's growing by 100% every two years, but that doesn't mean it's a fixed rate, since that percentage is compounded every period.
 

gm0n3y

Distinguished
Mar 13, 2006
3,441
0
20,780
0
I want to store a few thousand HD movies uncompressed in a RAID configuration with faster read/write speed than today's performance SSDs and at a reasonable price (say $500 total). Give me that in the next 3 years or so and I'll be happy.
 

rosen380

Distinguished
Mar 17, 2011
422
0
18,780
0
True, my mistake-- in any case, it still puts jumps from GB to TB to PB at around the same time frame given that it takes the same amount of doubling to get from 1GB to 1TB as 1TB to 1PB [10x]. In any case, 'zettabyte' drives are almost certainly a pretty long way off... :)

 
8 TB is nice but people might suicide if they loose 8tb of picture and important documents...

With that kind of space, HD maker has to make them more reliable. Or at least easier to get the data back
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS