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News Team Group Joins PCIe 4.0 Fray With Ceramic-Clad, White SSDs

Olle P

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Apr 7, 2010
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I'm a bit sceptic to that ceramic piece.
In aerospace ceramics are usually used to insulate from heat (at very high temperatures) rather than transmitting it.

That said, some ceramics are heat conductive, but those are rare and expensive.
 

King_V

Distinguished
I'll have to admit that I was a bit curious about it myself. But I made the opposite assumption: that ceramics normally transmit heat, and that the aerospace stuff was the rare, insulating type.

I made that assumption based on my very non-scientific "how many times have I burned my hand on a plate after heating something in a microwave a little too long?"

(the answer is: more times than I care to admit)
 
Jul 2, 2020
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Googling for "heat conductivity of ceramics" --> 1st hit:

"Ceramics are increasingly used in packages and printed circuit boards, because they have a number of advantages over plastics: much higher thermal conductivity, possible match of the coefficient of thermal expansion, and hermetic sealing. Unfortunately, the cost of ceramics is still much higher than that of plastics, prohibiting their use in low-cost high-volume products. Nevertheless, their use in future products seems unavoidable, given the trends in the semiconductor industries regarding the expected much lower thermal resistances of the packages and the concurrent design of packages and boards to facilitate heat spreading. "

Dated: 1999. We're the future mentioned.

Ref: https://www.electronics-cooling.com/1999/09/the-thermal-conductivity-of-ceramics/
 
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