Review Team Group T-Force Cardea Ceramic C440 M.2 NVMe SSD Review: Ceramic-Cooled Speedster

alithegreat

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Aug 15, 2013
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Hello,

That certainly won’t matter to everyone, but you’ll need to look elsewhere for a black PCB.
I think it shouldn't be a minus in that case. I for one never cared about RGB or colors, they sit inside a computer case which nobody stares while i am using my pc. I can't even see it if i wanted to , while using my pc.. I guess it's like showing off with your car these days, anyway.

So maybe aesthetic concerns should be highlighted in a different way? Maybe a blue :D color text? So people know it's highly subjective rather than data based.

Thanks,
 

seanwebster

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Aug 30, 2018
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Hello,

I think it shouldn't be a minus in that case. I for one never cared about RGB or colors, they sit inside a computer case which nobody stares while i am using my pc. I can't even see it if i wanted to , while using my pc.. I guess it's like showing off with your car these days, anyway.

So maybe aesthetic concerns should be highlighted in a different way? Maybe a blue :D color text? So people know it's highly subjective rather than data based.

Thanks,
Hi,

I disagree. While this point is subjective on the buyer, the thing is most M.2s, let alone high-end SSDs come with black PCBs. Even PSUs have black PCBs and they are well hidden. I would argue that it's not just a personal opinion, it's objective considering the state of the market at this point. Considering an M.2 like this will have to do without the mobo heatsink, the blue sticks out like a sore thumb for anyone who cares about tying together the looks of their build. Many enthusiasts tend to buy cases with glass panels/windows to see the insides, which is why RGB has blown up.

It doesn't matter to those pinching pennies, sure, but if you're paying a premium for a Gen4 SSD already, why wouldn't you want a PCB that actually matches the rest of your system? The company's own entry-level models even sport black PCBs. For a high-end option to not feature it, there is no excuse, it's a con for me. Also, most people I have spoken to about it agree that when it comes to actually making a purchase decision, they will more often than not opt for an SSD with a black PCB more than blue or green. Besides, the cost difference is under a dollar per piece from what I remember for DRAM. M.2s are even smaller, so the cost difference is minimal, especially, once again, for an already high-end built SSD with a heat spreader tacked on.

It has been in part my consistent complaining about non-black PCBs for years since SSDs first released that has pushed manufacturers to implement black PCBs in the first place. ;)
 
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Red_Viper_Martell

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If you're looking to compare this Cardera SSD to Samsung's 980 Pro (like I was), the Team Group Ceramic C440 1TB is included in the benchmark tables in the article for the 980 Pro itself. Not really sure why Sean wouldn't have the 980 Pro here. From a brief scan, the 980 Pro wins in most categories, except price.

Edited to note: This article reports a peak controler temp of 80℃ v.s. 85℃ on the 980 Pro. I would guess that the thermal conductivity of the thermal pad is a limiting factor.
 
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seanwebster

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If you're looking to compare this Cardera SSD to Samsung's 980 Pro (like I was), the Team Group Ceramic C440 1TB is included in the benchmark tables in the article for the 980 Pro itself. Not really sure why Sean wouldn't have the 980 Pro here. From a brief scan, the 980 Pro wins in most categories, except price.

Edited to note: This article reports a peak controler temp of 80℃ v.s. 85℃ on the 980 Pro. I would guess that the thermal conductivity of the thermal pad is a limiting factor.
This review was submitted before the Samsung embargo.
 

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