Temperature gauge problem

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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

A friend of mine is having a problem with a malfunctioning temperature
gauge:

"The PC's temperature gauge is apparently FUBAR - it thinks it's
something like two hundred degrees inside my computer, but, cracking the
case open, it's actually rather chilly in there, and leaving it off
overnight hasn't decreased the ostensible "temperature" either. So every
time it starts up, the fail safe measures kick in and it automatically
shuts down within three seconds."

Is there any way to fix this at home (without requiring specialized
skills or tools), rather than having to send the machine back to the
manufacturer for repair? For example, is the gauge a recognizable
discrete component that could be simply unplugged pending purchase of a
replacement?

Thanks,

--
"Always look on the bright side of life."
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Fri, 09 Sep 2005 15:36:45 +0100, Russell Wallace
<russell.no.spam@gmail.com> wrote:

>A friend of mine is having a problem with a malfunctioning temperature
>gauge:
>
>"The PC's temperature gauge is apparently FUBAR - it thinks it's
>something like two hundred degrees inside my computer, but, cracking the
>case open, it's actually rather chilly in there, and leaving it off
>overnight hasn't decreased the ostensible "temperature" either. So every
>time it starts up, the fail safe measures kick in and it automatically
>shuts down within three seconds."

Did this just suddenly start happening?

>Is there any way to fix this at home (without requiring specialized
>skills or tools), rather than having to send the machine back to the
>manufacturer for repair? For example, is the gauge a recognizable
>discrete component that could be simply unplugged pending purchase of a
>replacement?

It depends on the system, which temp is being measured and mis-reported (is
it the CPU or system temp?) and how the temp measurement is arranged and
monitored. Most recent systems have a diode inside the CPU for temp
reporting and some external circuitry in s SuperIO chip - those are not
going to be easy to replace. Some older systems had a thermistor attached
to the heatsink and plugged into a header on the mbrd for reporting temp.

To get an accurate answer you need to tell more about the system and
especially the mbrd.

--
Rgds, George Macdonald
 
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

George Macdonald wrote:
> It depends on the system, which temp is being measured and mis-reported (is
> it the CPU or system temp?) and how the temp measurement is arranged and
> monitored. Most recent systems have a diode inside the CPU for temp
> reporting and some external circuitry in s SuperIO chip - those are not
> going to be easy to replace. Some older systems had a thermistor attached
> to the heatsink and plugged into a header on the mbrd for reporting temp.

This is a fairly new machine, with a liquid cooling system; it seems
that this was the problem, not just the temperature gauge, so my friend
has ordered replacement parts. Thanks for the feedback!

--
"Always look on the bright side of life."
To reply by email, replace no.spam with my last name.
 
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

When I first got my latst motherboards,cpu temp read 150C or something. A
new BIOS fixed it

"Russell Wallace" <russell.no.spam@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:86hUe.15132$R5.960@news.indigo.ie...
> A friend of mine is having a problem with a malfunctioning temperature
> gauge:
>
> "The PC's temperature gauge is apparently FUBAR - it thinks it's
> something like two hundred degrees inside my computer, but, cracking the
> case open, it's actually rather chilly in there, and leaving it off
> overnight hasn't decreased the ostensible "temperature" either. So every
> time it starts up, the fail safe measures kick in and it automatically
> shuts down within three seconds."
>
> Is there any way to fix this at home (without requiring specialized
> skills or tools), rather than having to send the machine back to the
> manufacturer for repair? For example, is the gauge a recognizable
> discrete component that could be simply unplugged pending purchase of a
> replacement?
>
> Thanks,
>
> --
> "Always look on the bright side of life."
> To reply by email, replace no.spam with my last name.