[SOLVED] Temperature Quickly Spiking i7 10-700K

KingCronin

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Feb 15, 2017
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Hi guys I have a i7 10-700k being cooled by a Corsair H150i which is a 360mm rad. When benchmarking using XTU my CPU is hitting thermal throttle limits and can see temperatures up to 99 degrees.

I have checked that the pump is connected, that the fans are blowing through the rad, I've changed the thermal paste twice and ensured that the CPU block is sitting correctly.

Am i just wrong in thinking that this isn't normal or has anyone got a solution.

By the way Im only overclocking all cores to 5.1Ghz and haven't modified the voltage or any other setting!
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
By the way Im only overclocking all cores to 5.1Ghz and haven't modified the voltage or any other setting!

Here you go. Sounds like setting all cores to 5.1ghz and leaving voltage is the issue. If you're going to overclock, you want to get the correct vcore set which does not push too much voltage, causing thermal issues.

Here are your options:

1. set your overclocking up, manually valuing the vcore where it is stable at 5.1 (or target speed) so it doesn't crash, and work your down in vcore to stable value.

2. stop overclocking using the half-way method and assuming it will auto-select the proper vcore and other options.

3. set back to lower clock speed using half-way OC method

4. set back to CPU defaults.

5. benchmarks are synthetic test software and can often load a CPU higher than normal load would be if AVX, AVX2 or AVX512 is used. It isn't a realistic load test unless you disable AVX during these loads - UNLESS - you use software which makes use of AVX, then it might be useful.

On the Tom's Hardware test bench, I can run all 10 cores of an i9-10850k at 5.0ghz, but even with a 360 AIO, it gets into the 90's easily.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
Which H150i?
H150i Pro XT: the performance model meant to be used with overclocks. Has high rpm fans.
H150i Pro: the one meant for low noise operation and not overclocks. Has low rpm fans to further emphasize the quiet profile, but that also means the user can't squeeze any more performance out of it.

Also, the backplate was secured to the motherboard correctly? A loose backplate means improper contact between the cpu and the cooler cold plate.
If this checks out:
By the way Im only overclocking all cores to 5.1Ghz and haven't modified the voltage or any other setting!
Since you only adjusted the core frequency and left everything else on auto... I'm leaning on the likelihood that you have the H150i Pro and not XT.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
By the way Im only overclocking all cores to 5.1Ghz and haven't modified the voltage or any other setting!

Here you go. Sounds like setting all cores to 5.1ghz and leaving voltage is the issue. If you're going to overclock, you want to get the correct vcore set which does not push too much voltage, causing thermal issues.

Here are your options:

1. set your overclocking up, manually valuing the vcore where it is stable at 5.1 (or target speed) so it doesn't crash, and work your down in vcore to stable value.

2. stop overclocking using the half-way method and assuming it will auto-select the proper vcore and other options.

3. set back to lower clock speed using half-way OC method

4. set back to CPU defaults.

5. benchmarks are synthetic test software and can often load a CPU higher than normal load would be if AVX, AVX2 or AVX512 is used. It isn't a realistic load test unless you disable AVX during these loads - UNLESS - you use software which makes use of AVX, then it might be useful.

On the Tom's Hardware test bench, I can run all 10 cores of an i9-10850k at 5.0ghz, but even with a 360 AIO, it gets into the 90's easily.
 

2plash6

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Jul 23, 2019
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1. set your overclocking up, manually valuing the vcore where it is stable at 5.1 (or target speed) so it doesn't crash, and work your down in vcore to stable value.

2. stop overclocking using the half-way method and assuming it will auto-select the proper vcore and other options.

3. set back to lower clock speed using half-way OC method

4. set back to CPU defaults.

5. benchmarks are synthetic test software and can often load a CPU higher than normal load would be if AVX, AVX2 or AVX512 is used. It isn't a realistic load test unless you disable AVX during these loads - UNLESS - you use software which makes use of AVX, then it might be useful.
Or you can make sure the power supply has a high enough wattage for 5ghz, and can support your processor.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
It isn't just about watts, but even so, If the PSU was not powerful enough, he likely wouldn't be seeing thermal load peaks and spikes - the PC would just power cycle due to inability to provide consistent power. Overclocking and overheating wouldn't occur because the CPU wouldn't be on.

It's far more likely that an ineffective PSU would leave you with nothing at all, rather than too much.
 

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