Question The PSU's black wire (ground) on the 24 pin cable melts when there's load on the GPU. Why is this happening ?

Oct 25, 2021
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First time this happened while i was gaming the game froze and it seemed like the GPU driver crashed, after a couple of minutes my computer shutdown and when i tried to restart it only the case fans were spinning, the cpu fan wasn't.

I took out the 24 pin cable and i found that the ground wire on it is melted into the socket.

I took the PC to a computer shop near me, he cleaned the socket re attached the PSU and told me it should work fine now and that i should replace the PSU.

Next day i did buy a new PSU. Cooler master 750W 80+ bronze, to my surprise after a few hours of gaming the same thing happened again, the ground wire on the new PSU melted into the socket.

Now that i know it's not the PSU's fault what could be the cause of this ?
It has to be either the GPU or the motherboard.

I currently don't have access to another motherboard to test out the GPU on it.

So what do you think could be causing this ?

Note: i have been running the pc with the same config for 2 years. I only updated my gpu drivers 3 weeks ago.

My specs:
1st PSU: super flower 600W
2nd PSU: cooler master 750W 80+ bronze
Motherboard: gigabyte b250 gaming 3
CPU: core i5 7400
GPU: Amd rx 5700 phantom gaming D
HDD: 2 tb Western digital blue

https://ibb.co/hR59SVP
 

The Paladin

Glorious
Ambassador
Electrically the obvious answer is: it is an electrical short on your ground.
The troubleshooting question is: where is it happening?: and without the schematics of the motherboard, it will take a long time to track down.
Since both PSU wires have melted in the same matter (end process of the short) I would believe you have a component short because it seems to be a temperature-based issue, a chip/component seems to be internally shorting causing feedback on the ground... which? hell if I know.
A test you can do; take the board out of the computer case, and place it on a table on cardboard and run it again to see if it happens again
Also, check the bottom of the main board and case for hot points (indication of shorting/burning).
 
Reactions: Horbety7
Oct 25, 2021
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I forgot to mention i tested the PC without the GPU for 2 days and it ran ok, i even played video games on the integrated GPU, also i've been running the computer with the same case for 3 years now, So that makes me rule out that the case is causing the problem.

I'm currently testing out the GPU on the 2nd PCIE slot with the old amd driver i have been running before updating. If the same short happens again i think it's highly likely that the GPU is causing it.
 
Oct 25, 2021
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10
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I forgot to mention i tested the PC without the GPU for 2 days and it ran ok, i even played video games on the integrated GPU, also i've been running the computer with the same case for 3 years now, So that makes me rule out that the case is causing the problem.

I'm currently testing out the GPU on the 2nd PCIE slot with the old amd driver i have been running before updating. If the same short happens again i think it's highly likely that the GPU is causing it.
The same short happened again on the other PCIE slot, i also tested another GPU on the same motherboard and it passed testing of 24 hours.

Now that i'm sure it's the GPU, hopefully the issue has a fix since it's out of warranty

Also, thanks for the help paladin <3
 

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