Thermaltake's Combines PC Case With Fridge

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DFGum

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Finally, and it should be quiet as it says.You dont see mini fridge's making tons of noise. Sure you can hear when they kick on but its pretty quiet.
 
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there is no pump in this system. the vapor compression cycle doesn't need a pump it only needs at compressor, condenser, evap, and a metering device
 
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there is an error in your assumption about a condenser pump noise. In the vapor compression cycle, a pump is not needed to move the refrigerant. the refrigerant will move to the path of least resistance(high pressure to low pressure). the compressor may be noisey but it looks as the padded it in alot of insulation
 
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Yeah putting your PC in a fridge is a bad idea. It's called condensation and it's why this thing is only cooling the CPU not the whole case.

Ever fire up electronics after they've been in a cold car for a while? It ain't pretty.
 
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The real space heaters are the video cards (just looking at the type of client likely to buy this), especially now that they can be used for distributed computing programs. At some cooling for video cards and NOW we're talking.
 

neiroatopelcc

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Your drives go into the drive bays that are probably situated above the compressor.
The picture is missing some of the chassis to make sure the important parts are visible :)

It looks really cool though. Question if it's worth it though. Seeing how well air cooling handles the e8500, even water cooling seems to cost more than you get in terms of oc. If the chassis is being sold with a 1Kw psu and the compressor system @ 250-380€ it'll be an acceptable price though.
 

seatrotter

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In the realm of compressors (for cooling/refrigeration), I wonder why no one thought of using one of those sterling-type compressors? Not only do they have longer lifespan and lower noise/vibration, but also has a high COP (coefficient of performance). Ofcourse, it depends on the design, but Global Cooling seems to have a good design: http://www.globalcooling.com/. Also, their compressors work on standard 12v, doing away w/ DC inverters. The only drawback I see in using them in computers is that you'd have to add another system to move the heat away from the components to the compressor and from the compressor to the radiator.

Too bad I'm tight on budget and resources to tinker w/ such setup :S
 

uszombie14

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[citation][nom]kyeana[/nom]well if the price tag isn't outrageous this could prove to be fun. Only time will tell i guess[/citation]
totally agree.....
 

bruhthakuga

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I believe that refrigeration will work well in Oil tank PCs, don't expect near zero temps as this will damage your CPUs very quickly.

As in liquid hydrogen extreme cooling, this method of cooling is seldom used in contexts other than overclocking trial-runs and record-setting attempts, as the CPU will usually expire within a relatively short period of time due to temperature stress caused by changes in internal temperature.

OH! The compressor is a Pump
 
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