Thinking of dabbling in watercooling (Yes ive read the sticky guide)

spathotan

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Basically I want something for my CPU only...right now, with the possibilty of adding a block for my 4870 later on if my CPU setup works well. So far im looking at this
http://www.frozencpu.com/products/6243/ex-blc-362/Swiftech_Apogee_Drive_Self-Powered_Universal_CPU_Block_Socket_775_754_939_940_AM2_F.html?tl=g30c85s725

Its a Swiftech, CPU block and pump in one. Its gotten good reviews and it also comes with the Swiftech H20-120 and 220 kits (also given great reviews and awards from Tomshardware, so has the CPU/Pump unit itself obviously). My post regarding this is questions preety much.

1. Is/has anybody here used this, and if so how was it?
2. From reading the sticky guide, I understand nominal head/head power/max head flow is more important than overall water flow per time, is the 10.6ft on this unit good, and is it strong enough to add a GPU block to the line at a later date?

Thanks in advance to any help.
 

spathotan

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I thought about that myself yea. And yes the pump is mounted ontop of the block. There is a detailed guide of the design (a picture), I think there are a quite a few layers of material between the pump and the block.

**EDIT** Yea, here it is found it http://www.frozencpu.com/products/image/6243/ex-blc-362_4.jpg/ex-blc-362/Swiftech_Apogee_Drive_Self-Powered_Universal_CPU_Block_Socket_775_754_939_940_AM2_F.html . Well.....not a few layers, basically just the cap with the inlet/outlet :D

Dont know how to read this chart at all but, http://www.frozencpu.com/products/image/6243/ex-blc-362_6.jpg/ex-blc-362/Swiftech_Apogee_Drive_Self-Powered_Universal_CPU_Block_Socket_775_754_939_940_AM2_F.html somebody else here might and explain. The Swiftech Apogee series is suposted to be designed for Quads and Duals.
 

phreejak

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The pump used in that kit is the MCP350 coupled with an apogee waterblock. The MCP 350 is a decent pump - for starting out - but is a wee bit weakish when compared to the more popular brands like the MCP655 or MCP355.

As far as the pump creating heat - adding it to the load - look, you can worry about every little thing but the truth is that the heat that ANY of the MCP models add is very nominal. I would not concern myself with that.

purposes of definition, “Head” refers to the height of a vertical column of water. This is the maximum height that a pump can sustain any semblance of flow rate before it loses its capabilities. For purposes of an example we'll use a pump rated at 317gph with an imaginery "head" of 36 inches. At 0 inches of height you will have maximum flow rate and the pressure will be zero. Pressure is a measure of resistance to flow. Thus, at its initial discharge, at 0 height, the pump experiences its least resistance and generates its fullest flow. As the height in the cooling loop increases, the resistance to flow increases and the flow rate decreases. Earlier we said that our pump had a "head" of 36 inches. The closer the pump gets to its "36 inch" height, the less flow is generated.

So, at 0 height we have 0 pressure and 317gph. At 36 inches we have full pressure and no flow.

All that being said, in the context of your cooling loop, especially if you are just beginning to create one (and one that you nay add components to later on) you just have to be clear about your o'clocking tendencies.

What and how you plan to o'clock will be one of the most significant factors in determining what you need to watercool.

If you are just going to mildly o'clock - that is, o'clock a little on the CPU or GPU side, perhaps even a wee bit on the memory - but you do not plan on messing with voltages - than perhaps the long run plan would be to cool JUST the CPU and GPU.

However, if you plan to aggressively o'clock - and by that we mean, the CPU, GPU and memory (and altering the voltages as well) - then you might consider making long-range plans for addition of a northbridge to the cooling loop.

The Northbridge, typically, controls memory functions like – a memory controller (for Intel Chipsets), a level 2 cache communicator and bridges the gap between the CPU and Ram – it also handles functions between the CPU and the graphics processor on the PCI, AGP and PCIe slots. Since this particular part is always busy it can generate quite a lot of heat.

I think that budget is also a very significant influence as well. Now, That kit with the integrated pump/waterblock is very functional, it might not be the best thing to consider in terms of longevity. I don't mean to say that it will break down on you but the pump itself has a flow of 105gph and a head potential less than the MCP655. In this aspect, you would be better off purchasing a separate pump.

I suggest this because I would also suggest getting one of the two more powerful swiftech pumps - the MCP 355 (for 3/8 ID) or the MCP655 (for 1/2 ID).

In terms of budget, what are you limited to?
 

spathotan

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I read in the guide that Tygon tubing is recomended, but it has questionable reviews on FrozenCPU.

Also, im unsure if I want this system to be 1/2" or 3/8". Half-inch sounds a little too big/thick, and quarter inch is too small.

Also, this is the block ive picked out http://www.frozencpu.com/products/6561/ex-blc-366/Danger_Den_MC-TDX_for_Intel_775_for_MultiCore_CPU.html . Kind of expensive, but it looks cool :D and DD is good I hear.

As far as the resevoir/radiator goes im looking at this http://www.frozencpu.com/products/6571/ex-rad-126/Swiftech_MCR220_Quiet_Power_2_x_120mm_Radiator_w_Reservoir_-_MCR220-QP_Res.html?tl=g30c97s709 . Its $35 at Newegg so ill snag it there instead.
 

phreejak

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The pump is fine - it is functional - but, I should caution you about the future - if you find that you really do like water cooling and want to expand your cooling loop to something beyond just cooling the CPU (i.e. adding a GPU and, possibly NB) than you will find that the pump you've selected is going to be woefully underpowered and you will end up having to purchase another pump.

http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/swmc12vdcpu.html

For a few dollars more you can have a pump that has much greater pumping characteristics (3.1 meters/10.8 ft of head - 317gph/1200lph) that will serve you well.

1/2 ID is not "too thick" for tubing. I have used it almost exclusively for the past 7 years.
 

spathotan

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Ok, thanks for the help again. Ill go with 1/2". Now all thats left to figure out is all the additional **** I need. Tubing....fittings.....orings?
 

rubix_1011

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Tygon or Feser tubing is pretty good. Some prefer one over the other. I've only used Tygon and its worked pretty well. Plain old PVC hardware store tubing works as well...just doesn't make bends too well.

Orings...not really needed...if so, they should come with the blocks and barbs.

Worm clamps (like car radiator clamps) work pretty well.
 

spathotan

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Ok. How about barbs, do they come with the pump/block like in the pics? Or would I need to buy 6 of them? (2 for resevoir/radiator, 2 for block and 2 for pump)
 

rubix_1011

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When buying blocks and pumps, they are barbed (usually) either packaged or screwed in. You might get multiple barb sizes with them. Usually pumps are made with a specific native tubing size...its a decent idea to stick with that if possible.

Typically, if you order from, say, FrozenCPU, you get the barbs your order, even if they are interchangeable.
 

spathotan

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Ok. The DD pump and block I linked above are both 1/2", and I just checked the pics and they do come with 2 1/2" barbs. Same story with the block, apparently that comes with all 3 sizes. I guess I should have double checked the pictures/descriptions before hand :D

So far with what I have..

Pump - http://www.frozencpu.com/products/6073/ex-pmp-53/Danger_Den_DD-CPX1_12V_3-Pin_Powered_Pump_-_DD-CPX1.html
CPU Block - http://www.frozencpu.com/products/6561/ex-blc-366/Danger_Den_MC-TDX_for_Intel_775_for_MultiCore_CPU.html
Tubing, 8ft of this to be safe - http://www.frozencpu.com/products/7184/ex-tub-186/Feser_Tube_Active_UV_Hose_-_12_ID_34OD_Anti-Kink_Tubing_-_Clear_UV_Blue.html
Clamps, 6 of these - http://www.frozencpu.com/products/7955/ex-tub-380/Zinc-Plated_Steel_Hose_Clamp_for_34_OD_Tubing.html
A spool of white thread tape
Resevoir/Radiator - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835108086

Comes to just under $200, which is exactly my budget on this.

Thanks everybody for all the help/advice, just really banging my head over this as its my first attempt at WCing. Now I just need to figure out the mounting/configuration :(
 

spathotan

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I looked at that Switftech and pondered it, read good things about it. But it puts me above my budget. The GPH is definetly much higher on that Hydor though, hmm.
 

rubix_1011

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Yeah it is, but I have had better luck with them being in stock on stuff than Newegg. If you are patient and look around, you can probably find parts everywhere with competitive pricing.