Question Thinking of updating to a Ryzen 9

Aug 10, 2020
26
2
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Hello, I currently have a Ryzen 7 2700x and was wondering anyone's opinion on the 9 series
Is it even worth it? They do however seem to have much higher boost clocks
The Ryzen 9 3900XT has a base clock increase of just 0.1 Ghz improvement

I'm not exactly an expert on CPUs so
Maybe a memory upgrade as well?

Win 10
RTX 2070
Ryzen 7 2700x
16 GB mem DDR4 2933
Motherboard: MSI B450M Mortar - MATX
Intel M.2 SSD
 
Hello, I currently have a Ryzen 7 2700x and was wondering anyone's opinion on the 9 series
Is it even worth it? They do however seem to have much higher boost clocks
The Ryzen 9 3900XT has a base clock increase of just 0.1 Ghz improvement

I'm not exactly an expert on CPUs so
Maybe a memory upgrade as well?

Win 10
RTX 2070
Ryzen 7 2700x
16 GB mem DDR4 2933
Motherboard: MSI B450M Mortar - MATX
Intel M.2 SSD
Base clock is of no consequence, at idle frequency it can drop much bellow that and some cores may even go to "sleep" and in case of higher loads goes to boost frequencies hitting maximum on one core and rest of cores up to 200MHz less .
As for R9 3900x, what you get is more cores and on account of it being 3rd gen Ryzen about 15-17% better IPC than 2nd gen. Except for number of cores performance is almost same as 3700x/3800x (for up to 8 cores used) or even 3600x for up to 4 cores used. All depends of your intended usage, # of cores vs. IPC.
You also have a option of using 5000 series Ryzen which would give you IPC about 40% better than 2700x and price of 5800x is comparable to that of 3900x.
 

egda23

Commendable
Jun 14, 2020
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Hello, I currently have a Ryzen 7 2700x and was wondering anyone's opinion on the 9 series
Is it even worth it? They do however seem to have much higher boost clocks
The Ryzen 9 3900XT has a base clock increase of just 0.1 Ghz improvement

I'm not exactly an expert on CPUs so
Maybe a memory upgrade as well?

Win 10
RTX 2070
Ryzen 7 2700x
16 GB mem DDR4 2933
Motherboard: MSI B450M Mortar - MATX
Intel M.2 SSD
What are you using your PC for ?
 
Aug 10, 2020
26
2
35
0
Base clock is of no consequence, at idle frequency it can drop much bellow that and some cores may even go to "sleep" and in case of higher loads goes to boost frequencies hitting maximum on one core and rest of cores up to 200MHz less .
As for R9 3900x, what you get is more cores and on account of it being 3rd gen Ryzen about 15-17% better IPC than 2nd gen. Except for number of cores performance is almost same as 3700x/3800x (for up to 8 cores used) or even 3600x for up to 4 cores used. All depends of your intended usage, # of cores vs. IPC.
You also have a option of using 5000 series Ryzen which would give you IPC about 40% better than 2700x and price of 5800x is comparable to that of 3900x.
If money wasn't a complete issue, I'm thinking about anything other than a Threadripper
Also I've never installed a CPU, I'll probably pay someone to do it so I don't completely <Mod Edit> it up - all those little leads on the bottom, my hands shake so
Most I've done is applied new thermal paste to a CPU, also I have a closed cooling system for the CPU so that's just
Long story short I don't want to muck it up

I had an idea about the base clock. But hey, that's an extra 100 MHZ lol, back in the late90s that was a huge speed improvement!
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Ryzens are dynamic cpus. Not static like Intels. So they'll boost according to need and ability. So in some instances you'll get max turbo on a few cores, or maybe partial turbo on a few cores and a higher or lower rate on others.

This kinda puts a 100MHz difference in the pointless catagory. Baseclock speeds are basically only relevant to testing process where exact speeds are required as a baseline. Otherwise there's so much variance at any given point you'd not see a difference at all.

Which makes the IPC differences between generations of greater value, core workloads etc. If you take CSGO, that uses only 2 threads. With a 2700x - 5600x there's an almost 40% difference in IPC. Put at the same speeds, that's significant amount of instructions processed. If the 5600x was at 3.0GHz, the 2700x would need to be closer to 4.2GHz to make up that difference in instruction count.

100MHz is chump-change in comparison.

With current gaming loads, even involving discord or YouTube or streaming, you are still looking at an average of @ 8 threads used. Granted a core is always stronger than a thread, so hyperthreading does lose out a little there, but that's really the only reason some games get a distinct advantage on the high core games, while others show very little difference between a 5900x and a 5600x.

Personally, I think the best cpu is the 5800x. Reviews don't like it because of its price point, but it does everything and anything Well. Not the best for production, not the best for gaming, but close enough in both to the best overall that it's price is justified. For pure gaming, the 5600x is the Ryzen to beat. Right on the heels of its bigger brothers, at a much reduced initial cost and cooling cost.

I like the R9's, but if you don't have use for its core count, or anywhere close, it's just too expensive to justify the small fps gains that you won't see anyway.
 
Reactions: CountMike
Aug 10, 2020
26
2
35
0
Ryzens are dynamic cpus. Not static like Intels. So they'll boost according to need and ability. So in some instances you'll get max turbo on a few cores, or maybe partial turbo on a few cores and a higher or lower rate on others.

This kinda puts a 100MHz difference in the pointless catagory. Baseclock speeds are basically only relevant to testing process where exact speeds are required as a baseline. Otherwise there's so much variance at any given point you'd not see a difference at all.

Which makes the IPC differences between generations of greater value, core workloads etc. If you take CSGO, that uses only 2 threads. With a 2700x - 5600x there's an almost 40% difference in IPC. Put at the same speeds, that's significant amount of instructions processed. If the 5600x was at 3.0GHz, the 2700x would need to be closer to 4.2GHz to make up that difference in instruction count.

100MHz is chump-change in comparison.

With current gaming loads, even involving discord or YouTube or streaming, you are still looking at an average of @ 8 threads used. Granted a core is always stronger than a thread, so hyperthreading does lose out a little there, but that's really the only reason some games get a distinct advantage on the high core games, while others show very little difference between a 5900x and a 5600x.

Personally, I think the best cpu is the 5800x. Reviews don't like it because of its price point, but it does everything and anything Well. Not the best for production, not the best for gaming, but close enough in both to the best overall that it's price is justified. For pure gaming, the 5600x is the Ryzen to beat. Right on the heels of its bigger brothers, at a much reduced initial cost and cooling cost.

I like the R9's, but if you don't have use for its core count, or anywhere close, it's just too expensive to justify the small fps gains that you won't see anyway.
I don't believe my motherboard will support the next series, however they verified it would run the 9s
Meh, I'm not having any issues so may as well just keep things as they are
Maybe next computer I'll have an intel, haven't had one since a dual core Walmart computer years ago
 
I don't believe my motherboard will support the next series, however they verified it would run the 9s
Meh, I'm not having any issues so may as well just keep things as they are
Maybe next computer I'll have an intel, haven't had one since a dual core Walmart computer years ago
Zen3, Ryzen 5000 series are last ones with AM4 socket. For next gen there will be new sockets, chipsets and DDR5 RAM.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Think of R as the power demand, so an R3 is going to demand a whole heap less power than an R9. That's what's important to the motherboard, the VRM's can only take so much heat abuse. That applies to the level of the board, not the chipset. A high grade B550 is just as capable as a low grade X570, and in many cases far better suited for higher R cpus.

The series, 1000-5000 is chipset dependent instead. So saying your mobo can handle a 9 doesn't say much other than its power capable, but there's a difference between a 3900x and a 5900x when it comes to the chipset itself.
 
Reactions: CountMike

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