Question Thoughts on first build

iXorizon

Commendable
Nov 4, 2016
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PCPartPicker Part List: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/HNMw9J

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.00 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - MasterAir G100M RGB 22.63 CFM CPU Cooler ($39.97 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus - ROG Strix X570-E Gaming ATX AM4 Motherboard ($329.99)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Kingston - A400 240 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($29.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($41.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB XC BLACK GAMING Video Card ($269.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($109.79 @ OutletPC)
Monitor: MSI - Optix G24C 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor ($184.30 @ Walmart)
Total: $1374.90
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-07-12 04:49 EDT-0400

For OS im going to get Win 10 pro either from the microsoft website or buy one from scdkeys
Ive been refining this build ever since January, doing tweaks and reducing price. Some of you may ask why i have an X570-E mobo for an R5 3600 even when im not going to be overclocking and to that i say i'd rather spend $330 on a mobo and be happy with it instead of spend $140 on a mobo that i'd want to get rid of the second i get the possibility.
For case i've been debating between an NZXT H500 or a Phanteks Eclipse P350X, both are the same price and for now its just a matter of whose temps are cooler, im also looking to buy a 280mm AIO for my cpu, preferably a Kraken X62 or an H115i RGB Platinum.
I'll be buying all parts except case and monitor from Microcenter as its 1 city away from mine
 
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This should be better...

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | AMD - Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor | $199.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI - MPG X570 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard | $159.99 @ Newegg
Memory | Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory | $64.99 @ Amazon
Storage | ADATA - XPG SX8200 Pro 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive | $74.99 @ Amazon
Storage | Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive | $79.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card | Asus - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB DUAL Advanced Video Card | $399.99 @ Newegg
Case | NZXT - H500 ATX Mid Tower Case | $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | Corsair - TXM Gold 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply | $74.99 @ Newegg
Monitor | AOC - C24G1 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor | $179.97 @ Amazon
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total (before mail-in rebates) | $1363.80
| Mail-in rebates | -$60.00
| Total | $1303.80
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-07-12 08:53 EDT-0400 |
 
Some of you may ask why i have an X570-E mobo for an R5 3600 even when im not going to be overclocking and to that i say i'd rather spend $330 on a mobo and be happy with it instead of spend $140 on a mobo that i'd want to get rid of the second i get the possibility.
Being happy with a motherboard is fine, but in general the motherboard should have minimal effect on performance, and it's probably not worth going with a very high-end board unless the rest of the system is also very high-end.

Personally, I would put that money toward components that will actually have a notable impact on how the system performs, like the graphics card. If the system is intended for gaming, putting that money toward graphics hardware could significantly improve frame rates. That 2070 in Hellfire's build, for example, can push around 40% higher frame rates than a 1660 Ti.

If you don't need lots of bulk storage, it might also be worth going with a single large SSD rather than a smaller SSD paired with a hard drive. Installing games and applications to the SSD will improve their load times, so you would ideally want all your applications and regularly-played games on the SSD. Good 1TB SSDs can be had for a little over $100 now.
 

iXorizon

Commendable
Nov 4, 2016
103
1
1,695
2
Being happy with a motherboard is fine, but in general the motherboard should have minimal effect on performance, and it's probably not worth going with a very high-end board unless the rest of the system is also very high-end.

Personally, I would put that money toward components that will actually have a notable impact on how the system performs, like the graphics card. If the system is intended for gaming, putting that money toward graphics hardware could significantly improve frame rates. That 2070 in Hellfire's build, for example, can push around 40% higher frame rates than a 1660 Ti.

If you don't need lots of bulk storage, it might also be worth going with a single large SSD rather than a smaller SSD paired with a hard drive. Installing games and applications to the SSD will improve their load times, so you would ideally want all your applications and regularly-played games on the SSD. Good 1TB SSDs can be had for a little over $100 now.
Well yes i do agree that the motherboard does have minimal effect on performace, however as i said in my original post, i'll be puttin liquid cooling, and I also forgot to mention that i'll be buying all parts on Black Friday at a heavy discount (if they are), and if it meets within my budget (which is $1300) i could maybe afford an AIO and a Ryzen 7 3xxx

I need lots of bulk storage because that's where i keep my games that aren't hardcore, i'm not a heavy gamer and i only ever play games like overwatch, gta 5, or rust
 

iXorizon

Commendable
Nov 4, 2016
103
1
1,695
2
I am also going to be replacing the X570-E in there once a B550-E or B550-F comes out, and if it doesn't then i'll get a B450-E, cheaper by $100 and im going to put that money towards a better GPU, possibly a 1070 or 1070 Ti, because i'm not into that ray tracing stuff
 
...and im going to put that money towards a better GPU, possibly a 1070 or 1070 Ti, because i'm not into that ray tracing stuff
On average, a 1070 performs similar to a 1660 Ti in today's games, and a 1070 Ti tends to perform slightly behind a 2060. The newer cards have less VRAM, but they have updated hardware that may give them an edge in future titles, so I wouldn't pay any more for their prior-gen equivalents. The 1070 and 1070 Ti are no longer competitively priced, so they are generally not worth considering on the new market.

And for about $400, the 2060 Super restores that 8GB of VRAM and performs around 10% faster than a 2060, making the card definitively faster than a GTX 1080 and within 5% of the performance of a 2070. It's basically a slightly pared down 2070 at a significantly lower suggested price. The 2070 has in turn been discontinued and replaced with the 2070 Super at its prior price point, and as such, some 2070s can currently be found for about the price of a 2060 Super as well.

And if you don't care about hardware acceleration for raytraced lighting effects, AMD's new Radeon RX 5700 offers more performance on average than a 2060 (or a GTX 1080, for that matter), and the 5700 XT offers more performance than a 2070. Currently, only reference models with blower-style coolers are available at this time, but there should be more options for these cards in another month or so.
 

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