Question Too much RAM?

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TheOtherOne

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Oct 19, 2013
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Hey! You can follow their advice and if you STILL want to waste money anyway, you can "donate" to me the remaining budget from that MOST EXPENSIVE parts picker list. I am always ready to help those who want to throw away their money. :ange:

Edit:-
On a serious note, if you really want to make it "future proof" for 5+ years then you should just wait for next gen CPUs release hopefully within next year? I know there's a saying, if you wait for upcoming releases, then there's always gonna be one in few months but in this case, Intel and AMD both will be releasing CPUs with new socket types, RAM is also going up from DDR4 to DDR5 and all these have been in same form factor/design for few years now. Even the PCIE going up to 5 which isn't that much of an issue since PCIE4 is still relatively new and will be around for few years.

And once again, if you just want to throw away some money, I am always a helping hand! :vip:
 
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Mostly, you can''t.

CPU/RAM/motherboard all work together.

You can swap out the RAM for larger. Sell and change from DDR4 32GB to DDR4 64-128GB.
CPU...likely that will need a different motherboard. And if DDR5, RAM as well.

For your current stated use? 32GB.
Personally, I would recommend 32GB (2x16GB) and call it a day.
I would like to mention again that I'm asking if the extra RAM would hurt the performance by >5% (trying to be more specific), not if it would increase it at all, I know it won't
 

Bob.B

Respectable
I would like to mention again that I'm asking if the extra RAM would hurt the performance by >5% (trying to be more specific), not if it would increase it at all, I know it won't
The only thing 128GB is going to hurt is your wallet.
For most folks 2x8GB is ample.
If you want to future proof a little bump it to 2x16GB.
Fit the machine with the proper speed and enjoy.

Forget about the quad channel stuff that's for a unique group of users.
 
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Using four slots together while it is just dual channel slots, possibly result in looser timings and lower OCing depending on the MOBO and your luck.

Too much memory itself won't hurt the performance, it nevertheless won't affect the performance.
Extra memory will do nothing. It is no more than decorations.

Some games like flight simulators, cities skylines need lots of memory. But developers always consider average computer specs most of the time.

If you are using YouTube, netflix and chromes, more than 32GB is some expensive decor.
I'd save $2000 and will spend it 5 years later buying a better computer than your current PC plan unless the money is unlimited lol.
 

mamasan2000

Distinguished
Buying lots of RAM is like buying a 16 tb harddisk and only installing Windows on it. You are wasting 15.9 tb of it.
Most of todays motherboards, at least on the AMD side, are optimized for 2 RAM sticks. Daisychain topology. T-topology would be better for 4 sticks. But since most consumers use 2 sticks, that is what motherboards are optimized for. Most mobo reviews have some sort of RAM overclocking test and if your mobo comes last in every one of them, what do you think a consumer will think of your boards? Not good enough, right? 2 sticks will place less burden on the memory controller since there is less activity and commands to run. Can you handle 2 people talking to you at the same time? What if it was 4?

Ideally what you would want is 2 dualrank sticks at speeds the mobo can run and with sufficient capacity. I think the smallest amount you can get of DDR5 will be 32 gigs. 32 gigs will suffice for gaming for a good while. We are only now hitting 16 gig RAM limits on certain games, like 5 years later. Around 5 years ago people might have suggested 8 gigs for a gaming rig. Maybe it was 8 years ago but anyway. Alder Lake will still be a dualchannel platform. First 2 slots are 1 channel and the last 2 slots is the other channel. Which is why slots 2 and 4 is the recommended setup for RAM. Why the 2 slots furthest away from CPU? I guess it is because of natural termination. If it was slots 1 and 3, you would have to make sure the signal never hits slots 2 and 4, bounce back to slots 1 and 3, and mess with signal integrity or cause interference.

Currently no one knows (publicly) what Alder Lake can run memory at and exactly what speeds RAM will have. There is talk about 6400 Mhz, 8000 Mhz. It's a new platform, there will be kinks to sort out. It's sort of the 'early adopter tax'. You pay extra for it, while being the betatester of it.
2nd gen of anything usually works much better, in terms of architecture. That's true of CPUs, GPUs, RAM, platforms. Remember when DDR4 2400 Mhz was a feat? These days you wouldn't even want it. Remember 1st gen Ryzen? RDNA1? They all had issues.

DDR5 will have RAM power management on the sticks, called PMIC. How will that affect things? Will RAM need to be cooled down with fans? What if the PMIC isn't all that good, what then? And ECC onboard the RAM. Why is that? Are they expecting lots of memory errors on the sticks? This isn't traditional ECC. It wont be ECC between RAM and CPU, it will only be local to the RAM. ECC stands for Error Correcting Code.
 
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The only thing 128GB is going to hurt is your wallet.
For most folks 2x8GB is ample.
If you want to future proof a little bump it to 2x16GB.
Fit the machine with the proper speed and enjoy.

Forget about the quad channel stuff that's for a unique group of users.
Just to clarify, I would potentially consider myself in that "unique group of users"
Using four slots together while it is just dual channel slots, possibly result in looser timings and lower OCing depending on the MOBO and your luck.

Too much memory itself won't hurt the performance, it nevertheless won't affect the performance.
Extra memory will do nothing. It is no more than decorations.

Some games like flight simulators, cities skylines need lots of memory. But developers always consider average computer specs most of the time.

If you are using YouTube, netflix and chromes, more than 32GB is some expensive decor.
I'd save $2000 and will spend it 5 years later buying a better computer than your current PC plan unless the money is unlimited lol.
The total PC plan is ~$8k
so ig it's closing on the level of "unlimited money"
Buying lots of RAM is like buying a 16 tb harddisk and only installing Windows on it. You are wasting 15.9 tb of it.
Most of todays motherboards, at least on the AMD side, are optimized for 2 RAM sticks. Daisychain topology. T-topology would be better for 4 sticks. But since most consumers use 2 sticks, that is what motherboards are optimized for. Most mobo reviews have some sort of RAM overclocking test and if your mobo comes last in every one of them, what do you think a consumer will think of your boards? Not good enough, right? 2 sticks will place less burden on the memory controller since there is less activity and commands to run. Can you handle 2 people talking to you at the same time? What if it was 4?

Ideally what you would want is 2 dualrank sticks at speeds the mobo can run and with sufficient capacity. I think the smallest amount you can get of DDR5 will be 32 gigs. 32 gigs will suffice for gaming for a good while. We are only now hitting 16 gig RAM limits on certain games, like 5 years later. Around 5 years ago people might have suggested 8 gigs for a gaming rig. Maybe it was 8 years ago but anyway. Alder Lake will still be a dualchannel platform. First 2 slots are 1 channel and the last 2 slots is the other channel. Which is why slots 2 and 4 is the recommended setup for RAM. Why the 2 slots furthest away from CPU? I guess it is because of natural termination. If it was slots 1 and 3, you would have to make sure the signal never hits slots 2 and 4, bounce back to slots 1 and 3, and mess with signal integrity or cause interference.

Currently no one knows (publicly) what Alder Lake can run memory at and exactly what speeds RAM will have. There is talk about 6400 Mhz, 8000 Mhz. It's a new platform, there will be kinks to sort out. It's sort of the 'early adopter tax'. You pay extra for it, while being the betatester of it.
2nd gen of anything usually works much better, in terms of architecture. That's true of CPUs, GPUs, RAM, platforms. Remember when DDR4 2400 Mhz was a feat? These days you wouldn't even want it. Remember 1st gen Ryzen? RDNA1? They all had issues.

DDR5 will have RAM power management on the sticks, called PMIC. How will that affect things? Will RAM need to be cooled down with fans? What if the PMIC isn't all that good, what then? And ECC onboard the RAM. Why is that? Are they expecting lots of memory errors on the sticks? This isn't traditional ECC. It wont be ECC between RAM and CPU, it will only be local to the RAM. ECC stands for Error Correcting Code.
hey, that sounds like me
buying an 8tb ssd as a backup drive

I assumed that the motherboard would be able to run it (Maximus XIII Extreme)
did I assume wrong?
 
but I heard from my friend that having too much RAM can actually be bad bc it'll put too much load on the memory controller, but I want to make sure that it doesn't matter, if it does I can swap it out
I don't know if anyone's answered this specific concern, but the answer is no. All x86-64 processors are capable of handling at least 256 TB (or whatever 2^48 is) of RAM. What limits the amount of RAM the computer can actually use is a combination of the motherboard's firmware (it'll only count so much RAM before it ignores the rest) and the OS (Windows has a limit on how much RAM it'll use). You may have higher idle RAM usage because the OS has to spend more data keeping tabs on a larger RAM pool, but that's about it.

If money is no object, get whatever makes you happy.
 

mamasan2000

Distinguished
Just to clarify, I would potentially consider myself in that "unique group of users"

The total PC plan is ~$8k
so ig it's closing on the level of "unlimited money"

hey, that sounds like me
buying an 8tb ssd as a backup drive

I assumed that the motherboard would be able to run it (Maximus XIII Extreme)
did I assume wrong?
https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1200/ROG_MAXIMUS_XIII_EXTREME/E17684_ROG_MAXIMUS_XIII_EXTREME_UM_WEB.pdf
Sure, 128 gig is supported. But it's not going to be used, magically. So it's wasted.
Let's paint a scenario. You are browsing, maybe gaming. RAM usage sits between 10-16 gigs. For the lifetime of your system. That means you have 100 gigs of RAM that is never used BUT you paid for it. Unless you have a use-case for 128 gigs, why are you buying it? I can understand if you want to run 20 Virtual Machines or something. Even then you could get away with 64 gigs.
So it is just like with the 16 tb SSD. Yes, computer will recognize it but majority of it won't be used, other than the part that is taken up by Windows. You pay for it but no benefit. When you could have gotten a 250 gig SSD and been fine with that (for a Windows-install).

Here is another analogy. You want potatoes for the next 5 days. So what you NEED is 2 kilos of potatoes. But what you BUY is 200 kilos. Majority of it will only rot away. You wont use it, you wont eat it. But you payed for it.
Will those 2 kilos of potatoes taste worse (negative performance on RAM) because you bought 200 kilos? No. But the 2 kilos wont taste any better either (Wont be any benefit either). It is just a waste of money.
 
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Mind if I ask you? How exactly are you choosing parts for your build?
Looks like, you're just choosing most expensive options available.

$900 motherboard? How exactly is it any better than $250 board? Does it have any extra feature that you absolutely require?
if I was choosing the most expensive parts it would cost closer to 40k, by selecting motherboards with extra RAM/M.2 slots to spend the most amount of money possible

I'm essentially doing what I'm doing now
I started with a pc plan (11900k, z590e gaming, etc), then checked for stuff that should change, and it slowly evolved
I found out that Alder lake is coming out soon, so I'm doing research about RAM and stuff to make sure nothing will be a severe bottleneck that could be solved with less money
https://dlcdnets.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/LGA1200/ROG_MAXIMUS_XIII_EXTREME/E17684_ROG_MAXIMUS_XIII_EXTREME_UM_WEB.pdf
Sure, 128 gig is supported. But it's not going to be used, magically. So it's wasted.
Let's paint a scenario. You are browsing, maybe gaming. RAM usage sits between 10-16 gigs. For the lifetime of your system. That means you have 100 gigs of RAM that is never used BUT you paid for it. Unless you have a use-case for 128 gigs, why are you buying it? I can understand if you want to run 20 Virtual Machines or something. Even then you could get away with 64 gigs.
So it is just like with the 16 tb SSD. Yes, computer will recognize it but majority of it won't be used, other than the part that is taken up by Windows. You pay for it but no benefit. When you could have gotten a 250 gig SSD and been fine with that (for a Windows-install).

Here is another analogy. You want potatoes for the next 5 days. So what you NEED is 2 kilos of potatoes. But what you BUY is 200 kilos. Majority of it will only rot away. You wont use it, you wont eat it. But you payed for it.
Will those 2 kilos of potatoes taste worse (negative performance on RAM) because you bought 200 kilos? No. But the 2 kilos wont taste any better either (Wont be any benefit either). It is just a waste of money.
ofc not, unless I did -Xmxmin100g or whatever the argument is
and that wouldn't help at all, it would prob either just crash or run generally worse

I found it to lie around 20, but close enough, I know 32 is more than enough, it could even be considered "overkill," with 64 being known as insane, and 128 being somewhere between stupid and ridiculous


I'll try to come out with a scenario for what I'm doing

I get a job, but my parents have an extra car, and over the past 60 years of their lives have saved up enough money to send me off to college, where I will most likely pursue an engineering degree

I have 2 years, and a job, and a bunch of friends who I play Minecraft with
Most of the time, my experience is fine, 60+fps, 4k, etc, but in some situations it goes down to ~50, and sometimes <30, so I am looking to upgrade my pc

over the two years, I will save up ~$15,000 from just working (no stocks), and don't need all of it

I want to get better FPS, and in Engineering I have to use Autocad/Inventor a lot, so I just use a chunk of it on a PC



less of a scenario, more of a timeline, but hopefully it gives you an idea of what's actually happening here
 

mamasan2000

Distinguished
if I was choosing the most expensive parts it would cost closer to 40k, by selecting motherboards with extra RAM/M.2 slots to spend the most amount of money possible

I'm essentially doing what I'm doing now
I started with a pc plan (11900k, z590e gaming, etc), then checked for stuff that should change, and it slowly evolved
I found out that Alder lake is coming out soon, so I'm doing research about RAM and stuff to make sure nothing will be a severe bottleneck that could be solved with less money

ofc not, unless I did -Xmxmin100g or whatever the argument is
and that wouldn't help at all, it would prob either just crash or run generally worse

I found it to lie around 20, but close enough, I know 32 is more than enough, it could even be considered "overkill," with 64 being known as insane, and 128 being somewhere between stupid and ridiculous


I'll try to come out with a scenario for what I'm doing

I get a job, but my parents have an extra car, and over the past 60 years of their lives have saved up enough money to send me off to college, where I will most likely pursue an engineering degree

I have 2 years, and a job, and a bunch of friends who I play Minecraft with
Most of the time, my experience is fine, 60+fps, 4k, etc, but in some situations it goes down to ~50, and sometimes <30, so I am looking to upgrade my pc

over the two years, I will save up ~$15,000 from just working (no stocks), and don't need all of it

I want to get better FPS, and in Engineering I have to use Autocad/Inventor a lot, so I just use a chunk of it on a PC



less of a scenario, more of a timeline, but hopefully it gives you an idea of what's actually happening here
While you're doing work in Autocad at a schoolcomputer or your own, look at what RAM usage looks like. Aim for at least that amount. I don't know anything about Autocad but I imagine in the beginning you get to work with simpler models that might use less RAM. Have that in mind.
Also have in mind to buy a kit with sufficient capacity now. If you buy more RAM later, it is not guaranteed to work with your old memory. Because the ICs (chips) inside the RAM sticks change all the time.
For example, I bought two kits of Corsair Vengeance 3000 Mhz 15-17-17. One set was Hynix AFR, the other Samsung C-die. It took me months to get both running at XMP speeds. 2800 Mhz wasn't hard but that last little bit took a lot of tinkering. So brand doesn't matter, model doesn't matter, timings don't matter, in terms of if you will get the same ICs. Sort of an exception is B-die because no other RAM can run as tight timings but even then, theres like 10 different bins of B-die, all with different timings. Again, same dilemma.

So get a RAM kit, minimum 2 sticks for dualchannel operation. These are tested to work together.

So far, to my knowledge, every new generation of DDR has been worse than the top of the line previous generation. By the time DDR5 is good, who knows exactly what that will require. A new motherboard with better traces? A CPU with better IMC?
When DDR4 came, RAM sticks had A0 PCB layout. As far as I know, no one uses that layout anymore. Because A2 etc is so much better. Allows for faster speeds etc. The ICs are physically closer to the connectors.

And something I heard is motherboard makers has phased out A0 optimizations in BIOS to make room for newer RAM layouts. So the old stuff works worse. I might have experienced that. When I got a Ryzen 1700, I could run RAM at XMP speeds after a year of BIOS updates, AGESAs. At that point I could even overclock to 3333 Mhz. BIOS updates didn't stop there. A year later, I couldn't even run 3200 Mhz anymore. So RAM support in my case got worse. I'm just guessing here, really. Just my speculation.
 
if I was choosing the most expensive parts it would cost closer to 40k, by selecting motherboards with extra RAM/M.2 slots to spend the most amount of money possible
Yeah right. 40k pc for Autocad and minecraft. That's like buying a helicopter to fly to local store for groceries.

You know - you can install additional M.2 drives with M.2 PCIE adapter. Costs like $10.
No need for $900 motherboard, to do that that.
 
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Yeah right. 40k pc for Autocad and minecraft. That's like buying a helicopter to fly to local store for groceries.

You know - you can install additional M.2 drives with M.2 PCIE adapter. Costs like $10.
No need for $900 motherboard, to do that that.
It has 4 monitors, so subtract $60k, and you end up with $40,000
https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Finnegan16/saved/q4G9cf

While you're doing work in Autocad at a schoolcomputer or your own, look at what RAM usage looks like. Aim for at least that amount. I don't know anything about Autocad but I imagine in the beginning you get to work with simpler models that might use less RAM. Have that in mind.
Also have in mind to buy a kit with sufficient capacity now. If you buy more RAM later, it is not guaranteed to work with your old memory. Because the ICs (chips) inside the RAM sticks change all the time.
For example, I bought two kits of Corsair Vengeance 3000 Mhz 15-17-17. One set was Hynix AFR, the other Samsung C-die. It took me months to get both running at XMP speeds. 2800 Mhz wasn't hard but that last little bit took a lot of tinkering. So brand doesn't matter, model doesn't matter, timings don't matter, in terms of if you will get the same ICs. Sort of an exception is B-die because no other RAM can run as tight timings but even then, theres like 10 different bins of B-die, all with different timings. Again, same dilemma.

So get a RAM kit, minimum 2 sticks for dualchannel operation. These are tested to work together.

So far, to my knowledge, every new generation of DDR has been worse than the top of the line previous generation. By the time DDR5 is good, who knows exactly what that will require. A new motherboard with better traces? A CPU with better IMC?
When DDR4 came, RAM sticks had A0 PCB layout. As far as I know, no one uses that layout anymore. Because A2 etc is so much better. Allows for faster speeds etc. The ICs are physically closer to the connectors.

And something I heard is motherboard makers has phased out A0 optimizations in BIOS to make room for newer RAM layouts. So the old stuff works worse. I might have experienced that. When I got a Ryzen 1700, I could run RAM at XMP speeds after a year of BIOS updates, AGESAs. At that point I could even overclock to 3333 Mhz. BIOS updates didn't stop there. A year later, I couldn't even run 3200 Mhz anymore. So RAM support in my case got worse. I'm just guessing here, really. Just my speculation.
I am buying the PC at around April, so DDR5 should have come far enough to pass DDR4 by then, we'll see though

that's also why I'm trying harder to understand how to pick parts rather than what parts to pick
 
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Yeah right. 40k pc for Autocad and minecraft. That's like buying a helicopter to fly to local store for groceries.

You know - you can install additional M.2 drives with M.2 PCIE adapter. Costs like $10.
No need for $900 motherboard, to do that that.
I meant if I was trying to make the most expensive PCPartpicker PC (shown above)

in other words, I'm not just choosing the most expensive parts
 
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USAFRet

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I meant if I was trying to make the most expensive PCPartpicker PC (shown above)

in other words, I'm not just choosing the most expensive parts


We see these things here occasionally.
So you went through and selected a bunch of expensive parts. So what?


Anyone that has $40,000 (or $100k) USD to spend on a PC is not going to spend $40,000 on a PC. Simply a waste of time and money.



Your original system at $8,000 is still way too much.
"I don't know anything about Autocad but..... "
 

Zerk2012

Titan
Ambassador
I meant if I was trying to make the most expensive PCPartpicker PC (shown above)

in other words, I'm not just choosing the most expensive parts
This is what were trying to say.
Pretty much the same exact real life performance, 64GB of memory according to Puget Systems more than you will need, 1700 bucks less.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | Intel Core i9-11900K 3.5 GHz 8-Core Processor | $544.89 @ B&H
CPU Cooler | Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler | $109.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI MAG Z590 TOMAHAWK WIFI ATX LGA1200 Motherboard | $229.99 @ Amazon
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 64 GB (2 x 32 GB) DDR4-4000 CL18 Memory | $309.99 @ Newegg
Storage | Samsung 970 EVO Plus 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | $239.02 @ Amazon
Video Card | NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 10 GB Founders Edition Video Card | $699.99
Case | Corsair 5000D AIRFLOW ATX Mid Tower Case | $159.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | Corsair RMx (2021) 1000 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply | $188.99 @ Amazon
Operating System | Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit | Purchased For $139.88
Monitor | BenQ EW3280U 32.0" 3840x2160 60 Hz Monitor | Purchased For $699.00
Mouse | Glorious PC Gaming Race Model O Wireless Optical Mouse | Purchased For $100.00
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $3421.69
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-10-19 21:55 EDT-0400 |
 
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We see these things here occasionally.
So you went through and selected a bunch of expensive parts. So what?


Anyone that has $40,000 (or $100k) USD to spend on a PC is not going to spend $40,000 on a PC. Simply a waste of time and money.



Your original system at $8,000 is still way too much.
"I don't know anything about Autocad but..... "
I would've guessed it would be more than "occasionally," then again, I can assure you I am not one of those people

the first parts should be bought before 2022 (Cpu, Mobo, Ram, Cpu cooler, case)
we already have a gtx 1080, so that shouldn't be a bottleneck, meaning it might be the last part I actually buy
 
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This is what were trying to say.
Pretty much the same exact real life performance, 64GB of memory according to Puget Systems more than you will need, 1700 bucks less.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type|Item|Price
:----|:----|:----
CPU | Intel Core i9-11900K 3.5 GHz 8-Core Processor | $544.89 @ B&H
CPU Cooler | Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler | $109.95 @ Amazon
Motherboard | MSI MAG Z590 TOMAHAWK WIFI ATX LGA1200 Motherboard | $229.99 @ Amazon
Memory | G.Skill Ripjaws V 64 GB (2 x 32 GB) DDR4-4000 CL18 Memory | $309.99 @ Newegg
Storage | Samsung 970 EVO Plus 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive | $239.02 @ Amazon
Video Card | NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 10 GB Founders Edition Video Card | $699.99
Case | Corsair 5000D AIRFLOW ATX Mid Tower Case | $159.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply | Corsair RMx (2021) 1000 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply | $188.99 @ Amazon
Operating System | Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit | Purchased For $139.88
Monitor | BenQ EW3280U 32.0" 3840x2160 60 Hz Monitor | Purchased For $699.00
Mouse | Glorious PC Gaming Race Model O Wireless Optical Mouse | Purchased For $100.00
| Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts |
| Total | $3421.69
| Generated by PCPartPicker 2021-10-19 21:55 EDT-0400 |
shrug

I'm not particularly concerned about budget, especially bc I just found out that I apparently won't get taxed for my first $12,500


My current PC is a "good enough, but not insane" budget PC that we (we being my dad) bought 5 years ago, it looks something like this
https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Finnegan16/saved/8d3rvK
it's decent enough for most things, but not for others, which is why I'm buying a new pc


this is probably not something any of you can try to do, but if you go on to mc.hypixel.net, there's a game called skyblock, you can go into the main hub (use version 1.17), and your FPS should be... A bit choppy (<60fps). However, if you go into a dungeon, more specifically F7, and enter P2 (don't ask what that means), there's a large entity count of around 700 at times (mostly wither skulls, along with a couple hundred wither skeletons, which can REALLY lower your fps (down to <20, maybe even <10), so that's part of the reason why I'm buying a new PC, along with being able to own my own PC
 

Bob.B

Respectable
shrug

I'm not particularly concerned about budget, especially bc I just found out that I apparently won't get taxed for my first $12,500


My current PC is a "good enough, but not insane" budget PC that we (we being my dad) bought 5 years ago, it looks something like this
https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Finnegan16/saved/8d3rvK
it's decent enough for most things, but not for others, which is why I'm buying a new pc


this is probably not something any of you can try to do, but if you go on to mc.hypixel.net, there's a game called skyblock, you can go into the main hub (use version 1.17), and your FPS should be... A bit choppy (<60fps). However, if you go into a dungeon, more specifically F7, and enter P2 (don't ask what that means), there's a large entity count of around 700 at times (mostly wither skulls, along with a couple hundred wither skeletons, which can REALLY lower your fps (down to <20, maybe even <10), so that's part of the reason why I'm buying a new PC, along with being able to own my own PC
P2.....take off from plough......don't ask what that means.
 

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