Toshiba Achieves Record Areal Density in 2.5-Inch HDDs

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balister

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You are correct. For the author (as future reference) the calculation is:

(New Size - Old Size) / Old Size

So here, New Size = 750G and Old Size = 500G, thus:

(750 - 500) = 250 / 500 = 0.5 or 50%
 

none12345

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"Toshiba's move to 1 Tbit/in2 will increase the current density from 500 GB per platter up to 750 GB per platter on 2.5" drives"

Thats a 50% increase. Another way to say it would be the old drive is 33% smaller, but its not a 33% increase, its 50%.
 

hst101rox

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With laptop drives at 9.5mm now being able to have 3 platters instead of the usual 2, hopefully Toshiba will make a 4 platter 12.5mm laptop drive for 3TB in the CD bay! In the meantime, the Samsung M9T 2TB, 3 platter 9.5mm is a good drive for storage
 

PaulAlcorn

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"Toshiba Corporation has achieved an areal density of one terabit per square inch (1Tbit/ in2) within a 2.5-inch client hard disk drive (HDD). This newest disk drive innovation delivers 3TB capacity using a 750GB[1] per platter in a 15mm 2.5-inch HDD and increases areal density over Toshiba’s prior generation of client HDDs by 40 percent. Toshiba is dedicated to developing new technologies to increase storage performance and capacities in consumer electronics. Toshiba’s high areal density HDDs will be available in new products shipping later this year. "
 

bit_user

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Excellent writeup, Paul. I really appreciate your summary of next generation recording tech, and the short/medium term prognosis for each. Also, thanks for running the numbers and telling us what this means for 3.5" drive capacities.

You're new to THG? I look forward to reading many more of your articles!
 

bit_user

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I'm specifically interested in durability of the recorded data.

I wonder if HDDs will end up being similar to DRAM, where the drive periodically "refreshes" itself to improve the data integrity. In that case, you'd have to make sure to it doesn't stay powered down for too long.
 

Computer LVR

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In the interim, we have PMR and its previous limitation of 800-900 Tbit/in2 to tide us over. Toshiba's move to 1 Tbit/in2

did you mean 800-900 Gb/in2?
 
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