Transfering Hard drives

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I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all my
programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do a
complete transfer?
 
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Visit the website for your new hard drive and obtain the free utility to
clone your old drive contents to your new drive.

--
steve

nhit_whit_thenut_@yahoo.com
remove _thenut_ to reach me


"Acidweezil" <Acidweezil@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:603DA7DF-26C8-4DC6-AFDA-C0C616000989@microsoft.com...
> I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all my
> programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do a
> complete transfer?
 

Jimbo

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Acidweezil wrote:
> I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all my
> programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do a
> complete transfer?

You have to CLONE the old drive to the new drive. Just doing a file
copy will not work. The new drive will have to be connected to your
computer. Either to an unused position or you will have to temporarily
remove an existing slave drive. Or you could use one of those external
USB2.0 drive cases. I have used Norton Ghost 2003 with the drive in
slave position. The external case only works at USB1.1 in DOS which is
where Ghost 2003 does it's work. (Way too slow.)

And, when I cloned to the same size drive, everything worked just
fine, no problems of any kind when I booted up with the clone in
master position. But when I cloned to a larger drive, I had to do a
repair installation of WinXP Home. The repair installation completed
with no problems. You would need a WinXP installation CD, not just a
recovery CD that comes with some computers.

Good luck, jimbo
 
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Norton Ghost 9.0 will let you do it on the fly. No image necessary.
Hook up 2 HD and copy one to the other (don't forget to select make
partition active and copy MBR)

"Acidweezil" <Acidweezil@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:603DA7DF-26C8-4DC6-AFDA-C0C616000989@microsoft.com...
> I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all my
> programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do a
> complete transfer?
 
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"jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
news:85Iqd.15096$bh1.8335@newsfe01.lga...
> Acidweezil wrote:
>> I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all my
>> programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do a
>> complete transfer?
>
> You have to CLONE the old drive to the new drive. Just doing a file copy
> will not work. The new drive will have to be connected to your computer.
> Either to an unused position or you will have to temporarily remove an
> existing slave drive. Or you could use one of those external USB2.0 drive
> cases. I have used Norton Ghost 2003 with the drive in slave position. The
> external case only works at USB1.1 in DOS which is where Ghost 2003 does
> it's work. (Way too slow.)
>
> And, when I cloned to the same size drive, everything worked just fine, no
> problems of any kind when I booted up with the clone in master position.
> But when I cloned to a larger drive, I had to do a repair installation of
> WinXP Home. The repair installation completed with no problems. You would
> need a WinXP installation CD, not just a recovery CD that comes with some
> computers.
>
> Good luck, jimbo

Using Ghost 2003 you can indeed clone the contents of your internal hard
drive to a USB 2.0 external hard drive at USB 2.0 speeds - roughly 450 - 550
MB/min (about 1 GB every 2 minutes). I do this routinely using the Ghost
2003 bootable floppy disk to perform the cloning operation. If you're
getting speeds of USB 1.1, then your system is not recognizing USB 2.0
capability for one reason or another.

There is also no reason why you should have any problem with Ghost 2003
cloning the contents of one hard drive to another drive having a different
size (capacity). It makes no difference whether you're cloning a 40 GB drive
to a 120 GB drive or vice versa. The only limitation (if you can call it
that!) is the obvious one, to wit -- the destination disk must have
sufficient capacity to hold the contents of the source disk. There is
absolutely no reason to perform a Repair install after a Ghost 2003 cloning
operation. I have cloned hundreds of various hard drives in a variety of
systems and I have never once found the need to perform a Repair install
after the cloning operation. If you need to do so, something is amiss with
your system.
Art
 

Jimbo

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Art wrote:
> "jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
> news:85Iqd.15096$bh1.8335@newsfe01.lga...
>
>>Acidweezil wrote:
>>
>>>I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all my
>>>programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do a
>>>complete transfer?
>>
>>You have to CLONE the old drive to the new drive. Just doing a file copy
>>will not work. The new drive will have to be connected to your computer.
>>Either to an unused position or you will have to temporarily remove an
>>existing slave drive. Or you could use one of those external USB2.0 drive
>>cases. I have used Norton Ghost 2003 with the drive in slave position. The
>>external case only works at USB1.1 in DOS which is where Ghost 2003 does
>>it's work. (Way too slow.)
>>
>>And, when I cloned to the same size drive, everything worked just fine, no
>>problems of any kind when I booted up with the clone in master position.
>>But when I cloned to a larger drive, I had to do a repair installation of
>>WinXP Home. The repair installation completed with no problems. You would
>>need a WinXP installation CD, not just a recovery CD that comes with some
>>computers.
>>
>>Good luck, jimbo
>
>
> Using Ghost 2003 you can indeed clone the contents of your internal hard
> drive to a USB 2.0 external hard drive at USB 2.0 speeds - roughly 450 - 550
> MB/min (about 1 GB every 2 minutes). I do this routinely using the Ghost
> 2003 bootable floppy disk to perform the cloning operation. If you're
> getting speeds of USB 1.1, then your system is not recognizing USB 2.0
> capability for one reason or another.
>
> There is also no reason why you should have any problem with Ghost 2003
> cloning the contents of one hard drive to another drive having a different
> size (capacity). It makes no difference whether you're cloning a 40 GB drive
> to a 120 GB drive or vice versa. The only limitation (if you can call it
> that!) is the obvious one, to wit -- the destination disk must have
> sufficient capacity to hold the contents of the source disk. There is
> absolutely no reason to perform a Repair install after a Ghost 2003 cloning
> operation. I have cloned hundreds of various hard drives in a variety of
> systems and I have never once found the need to perform a Repair install
> after the cloning operation. If you need to do so, something is amiss with
> your system.
> Art
>
>

Well Art, I have no idea why you feel maligned when someone has a
slightly negative comment about Norton Ghost 2003. The facts are that
DOS drivers for USB2.0 are few and far between. Ghost DOS USB2.0
drivers do not work with my external case. And none of the external
cases I have checked out, claim to have DOS USB2.0 drivers. All or
most have Windows USB2.0 drivers. And each time the cloned drive was a
different size than the original, a repair installation was required.
I think it is a WinXP issue not related to Ghost. And there is nothing
amiss with my system. So Art, get over it, no one is blaming YOU or
criticizing YOU for glitches with Norton Ghost 2003.

jimbo
 
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"jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
news:ftJqd.15110$pU1.2628@newsfe01.lga...
> Art wrote:
>> "jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
>> news:85Iqd.15096$bh1.8335@newsfe01.lga...
>>
>>>Acidweezil wrote:
>>>
>>>>I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all
>>>>my programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do
>>>>a complete transfer?
>>>
>>>You have to CLONE the old drive to the new drive. Just doing a file copy
>>>will not work. The new drive will have to be connected to your computer.
>>>Either to an unused position or you will have to temporarily remove an
>>>existing slave drive. Or you could use one of those external USB2.0 drive
>>>cases. I have used Norton Ghost 2003 with the drive in slave position.
>>>The external case only works at USB1.1 in DOS which is where Ghost 2003
>>>does it's work. (Way too slow.)
>>>
>>>And, when I cloned to the same size drive, everything worked just fine,
>>>no problems of any kind when I booted up with the clone in master
>>>position. But when I cloned to a larger drive, I had to do a repair
>>>installation of WinXP Home. The repair installation completed with no
>>>problems. You would need a WinXP installation CD, not just a recovery CD
>>>that comes with some computers.
>>>
>>>Good luck, jimbo
>>
>>
>> Using Ghost 2003 you can indeed clone the contents of your internal hard
>> drive to a USB 2.0 external hard drive at USB 2.0 speeds - roughly 450 -
>> 550 MB/min (about 1 GB every 2 minutes). I do this routinely using the
>> Ghost 2003 bootable floppy disk to perform the cloning operation. If
>> you're getting speeds of USB 1.1, then your system is not recognizing USB
>> 2.0 capability for one reason or another.
>>
>> There is also no reason why you should have any problem with Ghost 2003
>> cloning the contents of one hard drive to another drive having a
>> different size (capacity). It makes no difference whether you're cloning
>> a 40 GB drive to a 120 GB drive or vice versa. The only limitation (if
>> you can call it that!) is the obvious one, to wit -- the destination disk
>> must have sufficient capacity to hold the contents of the source disk.
>> There is absolutely no reason to perform a Repair install after a Ghost
>> 2003 cloning operation. I have cloned hundreds of various hard drives in
>> a variety of systems and I have never once found the need to perform a
>> Repair install after the cloning operation. If you need to do so,
>> something is amiss with your system.
>> Art
>
> Well Art, I have no idea why you feel maligned when someone has a slightly
> negative comment about Norton Ghost 2003. The facts are that DOS drivers
> for USB2.0 are few and far between. Ghost DOS USB2.0 drivers do not work
> with my external case. And none of the external cases I have checked out,
> claim to have DOS USB2.0 drivers. All or most have Windows USB2.0 drivers.
> And each time the cloned drive was a different size than the original, a
> repair installation was required. I think it is a WinXP issue not related
> to Ghost. And there is nothing amiss with my system. So Art, get over it,
> no one is blaming YOU or criticizing YOU for glitches with Norton Ghost
> 2003.
>
> jimbo

Ghost 9.0 works great for me :)

Transferred a 160GB primary hdd (c:\60GB, d:\100GB) to a 60GB hdd (c:\60GB,
d:\30GB). Did not require a repair install. WinXP SP2 O/S. Do not have
nor ever used an external drive - so no comment there.

r.
 
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"jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
news:ftJqd.15110$pU1.2628@newsfe01.lga...
> Art wrote:
>> "jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
>> news:85Iqd.15096$bh1.8335@newsfe01.lga...
>>
>>>Acidweezil wrote:
>>>
>>>>I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all
>>>>my programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do
>>>>a complete transfer?
>>>
>>>You have to CLONE the old drive to the new drive. Just doing a file copy
>>>will not work. The new drive will have to be connected to your computer.
>>>Either to an unused position or you will have to temporarily remove an
>>>existing slave drive. Or you could use one of those external USB2.0 drive
>>>cases. I have used Norton Ghost 2003 with the drive in slave position.
>>>The external case only works at USB1.1 in DOS which is where Ghost 2003
>>>does it's work. (Way too slow.)
>>>
>>>And, when I cloned to the same size drive, everything worked just fine,
>>>no problems of any kind when I booted up with the clone in master
>>>position. But when I cloned to a larger drive, I had to do a repair
>>>installation of WinXP Home. The repair installation completed with no
>>>problems. You would need a WinXP installation CD, not just a recovery CD
>>>that comes with some computers.
>>>
>>>Good luck, jimbo
>>
>>
>> Using Ghost 2003 you can indeed clone the contents of your internal hard
>> drive to a USB 2.0 external hard drive at USB 2.0 speeds - roughly 450 -
>> 550 MB/min (about 1 GB every 2 minutes). I do this routinely using the
>> Ghost 2003 bootable floppy disk to perform the cloning operation. If
>> you're getting speeds of USB 1.1, then your system is not recognizing USB
>> 2.0 capability for one reason or another.
>>
>> There is also no reason why you should have any problem with Ghost 2003
>> cloning the contents of one hard drive to another drive having a
>> different size (capacity). It makes no difference whether you're cloning
>> a 40 GB drive to a 120 GB drive or vice versa. The only limitation (if
>> you can call it that!) is the obvious one, to wit -- the destination disk
>> must have sufficient capacity to hold the contents of the source disk.
>> There is absolutely no reason to perform a Repair install after a Ghost
>> 2003 cloning operation. I have cloned hundreds of various hard drives in
>> a variety of systems and I have never once found the need to perform a
>> Repair install after the cloning operation. If you need to do so,
>> something is amiss with your system.
>> Art
>
> Well Art, I have no idea why you feel maligned when someone has a slightly
> negative comment about Norton Ghost 2003. The facts are that DOS drivers
> for USB2.0 are few and far between. Ghost DOS USB2.0 drivers do not work
> with my external case. And none of the external cases I have checked out,
> claim to have DOS USB2.0 drivers. All or most have Windows USB2.0 drivers.
> And each time the cloned drive was a different size than the original, a
> repair installation was required. I think it is a WinXP issue not related
> to Ghost. And there is nothing amiss with my system. So Art, get over it,
> no one is blaming YOU or criticizing YOU for glitches with Norton Ghost
> 2003.
>
> jimbo

Jimbo:
Please understand I do not feel "maligned" when you or anyone criticizes the
Norton Ghost 2003 program. What bothers me is the nonsense that many posters
spread as fact concerning this or that feature of the Ghost program,
specifically the Ghost 2003 program with which I've had a great deal of
experience.

I have no understanding of your reference to "DOS USB 2.0 drivers". Using
the Ghost 2003 floppy disk and Windows XP w/SP1 or SP2, you do not need "DOS
USB 2.0 drivers" to clone your internal hard drive to a USB 2.0 external
hard drive. All that is necessary is that your system supports USB 2.0 and
you are using the latest version of the Ghost 2003 program. As I stated in
my previous posting, I've cloned many varieties of USB 2.0 external hard
drives with the Ghost 2003 program a few hundred times at USB 2.0 speed
without any problem. Why you are having this problem escapes me.

Again, I reiterate that a Repair install after a cloning operation is
unnecessary regardless of the different capacities of the source and
destination drives involved. I have performed hundreds of cloning operations
with the Ghost 2003 program and I have never, repeat "never", found the
necessity of performing a Repair install. Again, why you have found it a
necessity to do so is a mystery to me.

Jimbo, I'll repeat what I've stated many times before. I wish every software
program that I work with (or ever will work with) was as simple,
straightforward, and effective to use as the Ghost 2003 program.
Art
 

Jimbo

Distinguished
Feb 20, 2004
390
0
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Art wrote:
> "jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
> news:ftJqd.15110$pU1.2628@newsfe01.lga...
>
>>Art wrote:
>>
>>>"jimbo" <jimbo62@spamex.com> wrote in message
>>>news:85Iqd.15096$bh1.8335@newsfe01.lga...
>>>
>>>
>>>>Acidweezil wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I am trying to transfer windows xp proffesional, all my files, and all
>>>>>my programs from my old 4 gig hard drive to a new 40 gig. how d o i do
>>>>>a complete transfer?
>>>>
>>>>You have to CLONE the old drive to the new drive. Just doing a file copy
>>>>will not work. The new drive will have to be connected to your computer.
>>>>Either to an unused position or you will have to temporarily remove an
>>>>existing slave drive. Or you could use one of those external USB2.0 drive
>>>>cases. I have used Norton Ghost 2003 with the drive in slave position.
>>>>The external case only works at USB1.1 in DOS which is where Ghost 2003
>>>>does it's work. (Way too slow.)
>>>>
>>>>And, when I cloned to the same size drive, everything worked just fine,
>>>>no problems of any kind when I booted up with the clone in master
>>>>position. But when I cloned to a larger drive, I had to do a repair
>>>>installation of WinXP Home. The repair installation completed with no
>>>>problems. You would need a WinXP installation CD, not just a recovery CD
>>>>that comes with some computers.
>>>>
>>>>Good luck, jimbo
>>>
>>>
>>>Using Ghost 2003 you can indeed clone the contents of your internal hard
>>>drive to a USB 2.0 external hard drive at USB 2.0 speeds - roughly 450 -
>>>550 MB/min (about 1 GB every 2 minutes). I do this routinely using the
>>>Ghost 2003 bootable floppy disk to perform the cloning operation. If
>>>you're getting speeds of USB 1.1, then your system is not recognizing USB
>>>2.0 capability for one reason or another.
>>>
>>>There is also no reason why you should have any problem with Ghost 2003
>>>cloning the contents of one hard drive to another drive having a
>>>different size (capacity). It makes no difference whether you're cloning
>>>a 40 GB drive to a 120 GB drive or vice versa. The only limitation (if
>>>you can call it that!) is the obvious one, to wit -- the destination disk
>>>must have sufficient capacity to hold the contents of the source disk.
>>>There is absolutely no reason to perform a Repair install after a Ghost
>>>2003 cloning operation. I have cloned hundreds of various hard drives in
>>>a variety of systems and I have never once found the need to perform a
>>>Repair install after the cloning operation. If you need to do so,
>>>something is amiss with your system.
>>>Art
>>
>>Well Art, I have no idea why you feel maligned when someone has a slightly
>>negative comment about Norton Ghost 2003. The facts are that DOS drivers
>>for USB2.0 are few and far between. Ghost DOS USB2.0 drivers do not work
>>with my external case. And none of the external cases I have checked out,
>>claim to have DOS USB2.0 drivers. All or most have Windows USB2.0 drivers.
>>And each time the cloned drive was a different size than the original, a
>>repair installation was required. I think it is a WinXP issue not related
>>to Ghost. And there is nothing amiss with my system. So Art, get over it,
>>no one is blaming YOU or criticizing YOU for glitches with Norton Ghost
>>2003.
>>
>>jimbo
>
>
> Jimbo:
> Please understand I do not feel "maligned" when you or anyone criticizes the
> Norton Ghost 2003 program. What bothers me is the nonsense that many posters
> spread as fact concerning this or that feature of the Ghost program,
> specifically the Ghost 2003 program with which I've had a great deal of
> experience.
>
> I have no understanding of your reference to "DOS USB 2.0 drivers". Using
> the Ghost 2003 floppy disk and Windows XP w/SP1 or SP2, you do not need "DOS
> USB 2.0 drivers" to clone your internal hard drive to a USB 2.0 external
> hard drive. All that is necessary is that your system supports USB 2.0 and
> you are using the latest version of the Ghost 2003 program. As I stated in
> my previous posting, I've cloned many varieties of USB 2.0 external hard
> drives with the Ghost 2003 program a few hundred times at USB 2.0 speed
> without any problem. Why you are having this problem escapes me.
>
> Again, I reiterate that a Repair install after a cloning operation is
> unnecessary regardless of the different capacities of the source and
> destination drives involved. I have performed hundreds of cloning operations
> with the Ghost 2003 program and I have never, repeat "never", found the
> necessity of performing a Repair install. Again, why you have found it a
> necessity to do so is a mystery to me.
>
> Jimbo, I'll repeat what I've stated many times before. I wish every software
> program that I work with (or ever will work with) was as simple,
> straightforward, and effective to use as the Ghost 2003 program.
> Art
>
>

Art, I doubt you have ever cloned a hard drive using external USB
enclosures or you would know about DOS USB drivers. And you would know
that Ghost 2003 boots into DOS whether or not you start the process
from Windows or from a boot floppy. The fact that you make no
distinction between "your system", DOS or Windows indicates that you
have very limited understanding of computers, operating systems or
drivers.

So, please quit responding to my posts.

jimbo