Question Tried to install new RAM. Now there is not signal from display and mouse and keyboard does not work. Please help.

Jun 9, 2023
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Hello,

I purchased a new RAM stick and tried to install it, but it did not work.
Moreover, my display does not show signal and my mouse and keyboard stopped working.

My new RAM is Kingston FURY Beast DDR4 3200 MHz CL16 16 Gt.
And my old one was Corsair 8GB (1 x 8GB) Value Select, DDR4 2666MHz, CL18, 1.2V.
My motherboard is ASUS ROG STRIX Z370-E.
My PSU is Corsair 650W CX650 ATX.
Display is connected by both Displayport cable (from GPU) and HDMI cable (from motherboard).
I have never updated my Bios settings.

My initial steps to solve the issue:
1) Turn of the computer
2) Unplug the power cord
3) Test different locations for RAM stick. The RAM stick fits perfectly only in the DDM_B2 slot

After that, I tested to remove the battery from my motherboard.
Steps:
1) Remove GPU
2) Remove battery from motherboard
3) Wait 5 min
4) Assemble parts (battery and GPU)

Then I tried steps 1)-3) again.
But the issue persists.

After that, I tried to insert the old RAM stick back to its original position.
My computer and its fans starts up normally, i.e. no beep sound.
But still no signal from either display or keyboard and mouse.

If the issue is GPU, the keyboard and mouse should still work, right?
If the issue is PSU, then computer fans and RGB lights for GPU and fans should not work?
And the old RAM should still work with my PSU.
Could it be that the battery is inserted poorly?
I am really out of ideas.


Is my situation hopeless?


I would greatly appreciate any help you could give me!
 
Jun 9, 2023
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I have only one display, but to test if the issue is GPU related I plugged both displayport cable (from GPU) and HMDI cable (from motherboard. I have CPU with internal graphics card). Do you mean PSU cable between PSU and motherboard?
 
Jun 9, 2023
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Thanks! I took the GPU out of the case and tested the old RAM in different slots. The issue persists. No signal from display or keyboard and mouse. Then I checked the cables and all seems fine. The motherboards power light is on and RGB fans work.
 
Last edited:
Jun 9, 2023
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Could it be that the new RAM was not compatible and it somehow messed up my motherboard? Because now to old RAM does not work. I do not understand why the keyboard and mouse also stopped working.
 

Misgar

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Mar 2, 2023
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I cannot see what CPU you have fitted in the mobo. If the CPU has a built in graphics processor and you get no display on a monitor connected to a PCIe graphics card, try connecting the monitor directly to one of the video outputs on the back of the motherboard.

By removing the CMOS battery, the BIOS settings may have changed back to the "internal" GPU in the CPU and not the "external" PCIe GPU card.

As for the new DIMM only fitting in one memory slot, unless it's a question of it being too tall to fit under the CPU heatsink/fan, there's something wrong here. Height permitting, you should be able to fit any DDR3 DIMM into any of the four sockets.

Am I correct in thinking you have only one (old) 8GB DIMM and one (new) 16GB DIMM. It's normal to fit pairs of identical DIMMs for faster dual-channel mode, as opposed to slower single-channel mode with just one DIMM. Mixing an 8GB and a 16GB DIMM may not work in some combinations, because they are different sizes.

I've known old motherboards that don't POST (boot up), until you make a significant change to the memory configuration. Try powering on the PC with no memory installed. On systems with a small loudspeaker attached to the motherboard (near front panel connections) you may hear a beep code error noise.

Power off PC, fit the old DIMM into the first memory slot and try again. If nothing happens, power off and move the DIMM into the next memory slot. Repeat for the other two slots if necessary. You might "wake up" the BIOS this way.

We are of course assuming you've plugged the DIMM(s) in the correct way round and checked the latches at both ends of the socket(s) are fully clicked into place. If you've powered on the system with a DIMM the wrong way round, or only partially inserted, you may have destroyed the DIMM or the motherboard.

Good luck.
 
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DDR4 ram is notched so that it fits in the motherboard slot only one way.
If it does not fit, you are doing something wrong.
Align the stick level over the slot and push down evenly on both ends to get it seated.
It may take more force than you might think.

Ram to perform properly must be from the same matched kit.
Not only is the speed of the sticks different, but so is the timings.
A motherboard must manage all ram sticks with the same voltage, speed, and timings.

Sometimes you can get disparate ram to run by increasing the voltage well past the stock 1.2v.
Insert one stick in the slot that your motherboard designates as preferred for only one stick.
Run memtest86 or memtest86+
They boot from a usb stick and do not use windows.
You can download them here:
If you can run a full pass with NO errors, your ram should be ok.

Running several more passes will sometimes uncover an issue, but it takes more time.
Probably not worth it unless you really suspect a ram issue.

Once a single stick is running, enter the bios and set the specs you want which should include a ram voltage of 1.35 or even higher.
Insert a second stick in the second preferred slot and test.
 
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Jun 9, 2023
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Thank you for your help!

I tested the suggested techniques, but unfortunately, I was unable to get my computer working with either my old or new RAM.

I took my computer to a local PC store to see if they could fix it. They tested my parts separately, and the results suggested that my motherboard had malfunctioned. Maybe I should have updated the BIOS before installing the new RAM on my computer?
Regardless, something caused the motherboard to break.

The PC store informed me that my motherboard is too old to find a new replacement, so I needed to upgrade it in order for them to fix my computer. Additionally, because my processor uses the LGA 1151 socket, I was required to update it as well.

As a result, I ended up upgrading my motherboard, processor, and processor fan.

I would like to advise others to be careful when updating the RAM on older computers.
 

Misgar

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Mar 2, 2023
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Sorry to hear your attempts to resurrect the old 1151 motherboard after fitting new RAM failed, but at least you now have a modern system, even if it did cost far more than expected. It is still possible to find brand new "old" mobos on eBay that supposedly have never been used

As for updating the BIOS before fitting new RAM I'd advise against it unless it's strictly necessary, e.g. to fit new 48GB DIMMs in a system that only takes 32GB, etc. I have been updating my AM5 mobo's BIOS regularly though, because I don't want my 7950X to burn up. Unless there's a pressing need, stick with your current BIOS.

Updating the BIOS can go wrong, especially if the AC mains supply fails mid-update. You could end up "bricking" your mobo. I connect my computers to a 1500VA APC UPS, to guard against power failure during BIOS updates.

If you still have all the components left over from the 1151 build and don't mind taking a risk, you could buy a second-hand mobo on eBay, Craigslist, etc., and build a spare computer. I've bought dozens of second-hand mobos on eBay and for the most part, they've been fine.

Of course you could end up with a "lemon" but I find most sellers with good feedback on eBay are honest. Just avoid the ones with lots of negative feedback. If you do get a duff mobo, you can always claim your money back from eBay if the seller doesn't respond.

I keep a bunch of old computers to test new software before installing it on my main rigs and to check out suspect components. If you kill an old computer whilst experimenting, it's not as serious as mucking up your pride and joy.
 

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