Question Troubleshooting Ram Bought 2 of the same stick to go to 4 and Freq/not being recognized?

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
An AB350 motherboard with a 1700 CPU might be quite picky on RAM. Many times, four DIMMs (even purchased as a set) may only run at 2133.
Mix and match RAM even if it is "the same" is a gamble. Vendors sell matched sets for a reason. That is the only guarantee you will get for DIMMs working together.

What BIOS version do you have? Those earlier motherboards required several BIOS revisions to get memory stability.

Does it run stable at 2133?
 
Reactions: Darkbreeze

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What are your full system specs including CPU, motherboard and power supply models?

The bottom line though, is that when you try to use memory that did not ALL come together in ONE kit, from the start, meaning that it was tested together to ensure that all DIMMs are compatible with each other, then there are never ANY guarantees that they are going to play nice together.

They CAN, but they just as well may NOT too. The higher speed the memory is, the more likely it becomes that they will not. At default baseline speeds, the chances for disparate memory to work together are much higher.

And if this is an AMD system, the chances are VERY good that even with a four DIMM matched set, going beyond 2666mhz on some chipsets while using four DIMMs is an unlikely prospect.

The first thing you should do is make certain that you have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS version installed. For AMD systems, having an older BIOS version is the best way to ensure that you have trouble with memory configurations.
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
What are your full system specs including CPU, motherboard and power supply models?

The bottom line though, is that when you try to use memory that did not ALL come together in ONE kit, from the start, meaning that it was tested together to ensure that all DIMMs are compatible with each other, then there are never ANY guarantees that they are going to play nice together.

They CAN, but they just as well may NOT too. The higher speed the memory is, the more likely it becomes that they will not. At default baseline speeds, the chances for disparate memory to work together are much higher.

And if this is an AMD system, the chances are VERY good that even with a four DIMM matched set, going beyond 2666mhz on some chipsets while using four DIMMs is an unlikely prospect.

The first thing you should do is make certain that you have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS version installed. For AMD systems, having an older BIOS version is the best way to ensure that you have trouble with memory configurations.
is there a specific way to update bios? if so how would I do so? any precautions to take?
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
An AB350 motherboard with a 1700 CPU might be quite picky on RAM. Many times, four DIMMs (even purchased as a set) may only run at 2133.
Mix and match RAM even if it is "the same" is a gamble. Vendors sell matched sets for a reason. That is the only guarantee you will get for DIMMs working together.

What BIOS version do you have? Those earlier motherboards required several BIOS revisions to get memory stability.

Does it run stable at 2133?
I attempted to change xmp multiplier to 21.33 and it just reset back to 1866
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
is there a specific way to update bios? if so how would I do so? any precautions to take?
Based on your SPECCY listing you have the F10 BIOS. That is really old -- https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/GA-AB350-Gaming-3-rev-1x/support#support-dl-bios
You are going to have to do a series of BIOS updates and AMD chipset driver update.

Process I would follow.
Take OUT the two new DIMMs. Set your memory to Auto -- It should run at 2133.​
CREATE A WINDOWS SYSTEM RESTORE POINT MANUALLY -- That way you can back out the chipset driver.​
Update your AMD chipset driver -- Gigabyte has version 19.10.16 on the download site -- https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/GA-AB350-Gaming-3-rev-1x/support#support-dl-driver-chipset -- verify system stability​
Then update your BIOS to F31 -- verify system stability​
Then update your BIOS to F40 -- verify system stability​
Install two additional RAM. Leave RAM setting at Auto -- verify stability​
Select DOCP option -- check RAM speed -- verify stability​
I would ALWAYS recommend using the QFLASH tool in the BIOS to update BIOS.
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
Alright I have
Based on your SPECCY listing you have the F10 BIOS. That is really old -- https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/GA-AB350-Gaming-3-rev-1x/support#support-dl-bios
You are going to have to do a series of BIOS updates and AMD chipset driver update.

Process I would follow.
Take OUT the two new DIMMs. Set your memory to Auto -- It should run at 2133.​
CREATE A WINDOWS SYSTEM RESTORE POINT MANUALLY -- That way you can back out the chipset driver.​
Update your AMD chipset driver -- Gigabyte has version 19.10.16 on the download site -- https://www.gigabyte.com/us/Motherboard/GA-AB350-Gaming-3-rev-1x/support#support-dl-driver-chipset -- verify system stability​
Then update your BIOS to F31 -- verify system stability​
Then update your BIOS to F40 -- verify system stability​
Install two additional RAM. Leave RAM setting at Auto -- verify stability​
Select DOCP option -- check RAM speed -- verify stability​
I would ALWAYS recommend using the QFLASH tool in the BIOS to update BIOS.
Alright I have huge air fan a noctua d15 amd so I will need to remove heatsink like how i did to install the hardware, essentially turn xmp off and create a windows recovery point, then update my chipset and make sure its good then start updating my bios first f10 to f31 then from f31 to 40 then should I move to f50? or leave it at f40. and what is DOCP option? I will probably do this much later since I will need a usb for the bios update.
 
Alright I have

Alright I have huge air fan a noctua d15 amd so I will need to remove heatsink like how i did to install the hardware, essentially turn xmp off and create a windows recovery point, then update my chipset and make sure its good then start updating my bios first f10 to f31 then from f31 to 40 then should I move to f50? or leave it at f40. and what is DOCP option? I will probably do this much later since I will need a usb for the bios update.
You don't need to change any hardware inside the case to update the bios. Updating bios is just plugging in a USB drive formatted to Fat32 and the bios file copied directly to it. You can even put all the different versions on the drive at once as you will be selecting which one to use, but it might be better to do one at a time to avoid confusion. Don't use an internet updater in the bios if it has that option as it may not follow the correct update procedure. EDIT - You only need to install F50 if you are still having memory issues as that version could possibly fix memory compatibility. I know that AMD AGESA 1.0.0.4 B (F50 bios for your motherboard) fixed my memory issues on my MSI board, but I have a B450 so it may not be the same situation.
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
You don't need to change any hardware inside the case to update the bios. Updating bios is just plugging in a USB drive formatted to Fat32 and the bios file copied directly to it. You can even put all the different versions on the drive at once as you will be selecting which one to use, but it might be better to do one at a time to avoid confusion. Don't use an internet updater in the bios if it has that option as it may not follow the correct update procedure. EDIT - You only need to install F50 if you are still having memory issues as that version could possibly fix memory compatibility. I know that AMD AGESA 1.0.0.4 B (F50 bios for your motherboard) fixed my memory issues on my MSI board, but I have a B450 so it may not be the same situation.
So all I need is a USB? Is there any precautions to take?
 

kanewolf

Titan
Moderator
So all I need is a USB? Is there any precautions to take?
ABSOLUTELY. The BIOS downlink page has specific precursor steps, like updating the AMD chipset driver and specific intermediate BIOS updates. I listed those in my previous "steps I would follow" post.
BIOS updates are potentially dangerous. You can, in rare cases, brick your system. If your power isn't stable, don't do a BIOS update. That is a situation where you can brick your system.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If you do not feel as though you are capable of following the instructions given by Kanewolf to safely update the BIOS yourself, then it is likely in most regions you can take the system to a systems builder or repair facility and for a small fee, have them update the BIOS for you. You will want to be sure to take it to a REPUTABLE technician or repair facility, because allowing in any damn fool yahoo out there who says "I know how to work on computers" could easily result in bricking the motherboard the same as you doing it could.

That being said, it's really not rocket science. If you follow the steps given by Kanewolf AND take the time to read any instructions on the motherboard product page including any related to updating the BIOS, and perhaps also watch one or two videos on updating the BIOS on Gigabyte motherboards, you should be fine. If you don't feel confident enough after doing that, then take it to somebody who can do it for you.

Either that, or return that memory kit, then order a two DIMM memory kit that adds up to the quantity of memory you wish to run, rather than trying to run four DIMMs, and make sure it is a memory kit model that is either listed by the memory manufacturer as compatible with that board or is listed on the motherboard QVL list as compatible, and then sell you existing kit.

Truthfully, you'd be much better off trying to run a 2 x8GB kit of 3200mhz sticks than attempting to run 4 x4GB, especially when two of the DIMMs did not come with the other two and you have no idea if they will EVER work together or not.
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
If you do not feel as though you are capable of following the instructions given by Kanewolf to safely update the BIOS yourself, then it is likely in most regions you can take the system to a systems builder or repair facility and for a small fee, have them update the BIOS for you. You will want to be sure to take it to a REPUTABLE technician or repair facility, because allowing in any damn fool yahoo out there who says "I know how to work on computers" could easily result in bricking the motherboard the same as you doing it could.

That being said, it's really not rocket science. If you follow the steps given by Kanewolf AND take the time to read any instructions on the motherboard product page including any related to updating the BIOS, and perhaps also watch one or two videos on updating the BIOS on Gigabyte motherboards, you should be fine. If you don't feel confident enough after doing that, then take it to somebody who can do it for you.

Either that, or return that memory kit, then order a two DIMM memory kit that adds up to the quantity of memory you wish to run, rather than trying to run four DIMMs, and make sure it is a memory kit model that is either listed by the memory manufacturer as compatible with that board or is listed on the motherboard QVL list as compatible, and then sell you existing kit.

Truthfully, you'd be much better off trying to run a 2 x8GB kit of 3200mhz sticks than attempting to run 4 x4GB, especially when two of the DIMMs did not come with the other two and you have no idea if they will EVER work together or not.
I'm actually attempting to run 32gb x4

I have 16gbx2 and i bought a pair of the same set. Yeah I just did the system save point + updated chipset im going onto the bios right now I've flashed my bios before from f7 to f10 i just never kept up with it
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
If you do not feel as though you are capable of following the instructions given by Kanewolf to safely update the BIOS yourself, then it is likely in most regions you can take the system to a systems builder or repair facility and for a small fee, have them update the BIOS for you. You will want to be sure to take it to a REPUTABLE technician or repair facility, because allowing in any damn fool yahoo out there who says "I know how to work on computers" could easily result in bricking the motherboard the same as you doing it could.

That being said, it's really not rocket science. If you follow the steps given by Kanewolf AND take the time to read any instructions on the motherboard product page including any related to updating the BIOS, and perhaps also watch one or two videos on updating the BIOS on Gigabyte motherboards, you should be fine. If you don't feel confident enough after doing that, then take it to somebody who can do it for you.

Either that, or return that memory kit, then order a two DIMM memory kit that adds up to the quantity of memory you wish to run, rather than trying to run four DIMMs, and make sure it is a memory kit model that is either listed by the memory manufacturer as compatible with that board or is listed on the motherboard QVL list as compatible, and then sell you existing kit.

Truthfully, you'd be much better off trying to run a 2 x8GB kit of 3200mhz sticks than attempting to run 4 x4GB, especially when two of the DIMMs did not come with the other two and you have no idea if they will EVER work together or not.
ok I followed the instruction up to f40 the ram still has 16 GB reserved I checked everywhere on bios that i can think of and it recognizes there are 4 dimms but still only available of 16gb
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Funny, because the memory kit number listed in your first CPU-Z screenshot translates directly to a 2 x4GB kit.

Per your screenshot, model F4-3200C16-8GVKB seems to actually be F4-3200C16D-8GVKB, because there IS no C16-8GVKB so that would seem to be a discrepancy on CPU-Z reporting or a problem with the data flashed to the DIMMs themselves, IDK really.


In any case, what you are trying to do CANNOT EVER WORK anyhow, because that motherboard ONLY supports a maximum size of 16GB DIMMs and it only supports a maximum installed memory capacity of 64GB.

4 x16GB is the maximum THEORETICAL amount of memory supported by that motherboard, and I 100% assure you that the only way it would ever support that is if you were running a 4 x16GB kit of 2133mhz memory that came not only in a matched set, but also in a set that has been validated for that board AND CPU configuration.

I would actually be rather surprised if you could get anything beyond 4 x8GB using 2666mhz or lower DIMMs to work with that board and CPU model. You MIGHT be able to get a 2 x16GB kit @2933mhz or 3200mhz to work, with the latest BIOS versions, maybe.

In any case, 32GB DIMMs are not supported on that board according to it's product page and specifications.

G.Skill seems to think that 4 x32GB "IS" supported, and that these four kits are validated to work on that board, but they are all of only 2666mhz speed, but it's definitely unusual because Gigabyte says 4 x16GB is the maximum supported configuration for that board.

,
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
Thanks yeah it didn't work no matter what I tried. Imma go ahead and sell these bois off since they are brand new. However now I was able to boot with 3200MHZ on my original sticks with 1.35V but now it seems to crash some games after being in them in a while. but the system itself seems stable no pc crashes. I run time spy and it doesnt get very far without crashing. could this be a page file error? I know I had to change it once before but I reset a lot of settings that I did a while ago.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Which slots are you using?

How many DIMMs are you using now, with your original sticks?

What is the model of the "original sticks"?

Are the original sticks a matched set or are they separate DIMMs cobbled together as if it were a kit?

You might also want to make sure you have the latest AMD B350 chipset drivers installed, from the AMD product page here:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b350


And that you have enabled the A-XMP profile in the BIOS. Do you have the page file and virtual memory turned off or on in the advanced windows system settings?
 

Alejandro Pina

Honorable
Sep 12, 2013
32
0
10,530
0
Which slots are you using?

How many DIMMs are you using now, with your original sticks?

What is the model of the "original sticks"?

Are the original sticks a matched set or are they separate DIMMs cobbled together as if it were a kit?

You might also want to make sure you have the latest AMD B350 chipset drivers installed, from the AMD product page here:

https://www.amd.com/en/support/chipsets/amd-socket-am4/b350


And that you have enabled the A-XMP profile in the BIOS. Do you have the page file and virtual memory turned off or on in the advanced windows system settings?
2 - 4 red slots on my motherboard.

only 2

Same model as the ones above

matched set

I updated to the version that kayn gave me instructions to 19.10.16

I have an xmp profile but its auto just because i wanted to see if it would boot with 3200mhz it does. the auto is set as 32 multiplier and 1.350v

also have no idea about page file/virtual memory.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Set it to the XMP profile 1. Auto leaves everything up to the motherboard to determine what the settings will be. The XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings specifically determine what the speed, voltage, and primary, secondary and in some cases tertiary memory timings will be, and those timings are HIGHLY important in a specific memory kit being able to run without errors. Otherwise, a board will generally try to default to a fail-safe type setting that will offer a balanced combination of a safe setting and decent performance, but might in some cases be neither stable OR perform well.

Motherboards have gotten much better about training memory in a favorable manner, but they are not going to be as good as the XMP profile in most cases OR as good as manually tightening the timings yourself afterwards, if you should desire to do so, which then requires a good deal of stability testing to ensure that your manual settings are not going to lead to micro errors or instability.

I would update to the chipset driver version found on the AMD website, like I posted a link to. AMD and Intel generally have much newer, the latest, chipset driver versions available compared to what you will find on any motherboard manufacturers product page downloads. That is because THEY give those chipset drivers to the manufacturers in the first place, but those manufacturers don't always offer an updated version because it's usually more work for them to tailor or customize them in a way that makes offering it worthwhile as a model or brand specific offering. When it comes to chipset drivers I always recommend going with whatever the newest version is. Usually that is the version offered by AMD or Intel. Occasionally a manufacturer has a good reason to modify or update their version and if their version is newer then I recommend using that version or if there simply ISN'T a version offered to the public by AMD or Intel, then you don't have much choice besides using what your board manufacturer has on tap.

It would also be a good idea to make sure you download and install the most recent available driver version from your motherboard product page for the network adapter (LAN/Ethernet and for boards that have it, WiFi as well) and audio drivers. Most other motherboard specific drivers are already included in the chipset drivers.

In truth, if it were ME, I'd be looking to make a change to a higher end chipset motherboard like B450 or X470. Those B350 and A320 boards simply don't have as good of memory compatibility as newer chipset versions, even WITH BIOS updates in many cases. It's certainly not "essential", but I'd recommend doing so if you find you continue to have memory compatibility or weird little issues that you can't explain in any other way.

In truth, early on many of those chipsets and configurations wouldn't even run, AT ALL, unless you were are the baseline default of 2133mhz OR were running some form of Samsung B-die IC equipped memory kit. They've improved compatibility considerably, but it's still not as widely forgiving as say, most Intel platforms, or newer Ryzen chipsets, when it comes to memory.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS