[SOLVED] Trying to insert a larger GPU inside a compact case (Noob warning)

May 14, 2022
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If you ever heard the saying 'no question is too dumb', I'm here to challenge that.
So I recently inherited a entry level gaming pc. I was satisfied with the components except for the GPU (GTX 750) that I tried to change today to a Asus GTX 1060 dual fan.
However, I could not do that since my case is a rather compact case from Cooler Master(exact model unknown) and a motherboard that I reckon is very entry level, the PCI express slot fits with the graphics card but since its a larger model, it only fits if I disconnect 1 or 2 other connections that I'm not quite sure what they are connected for and which purpose.

PC Specs:
  • Intel Core i5-6500 @3.20GHz
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 1 GB
  • Motherboard: HP 8054
I'll do my best to explain with images below.
If you could not already tell I'm new to the most of this. I'll leave my specific questions in bold below images.

Below is two overview pictures of my pc.



Below is the new graphics card compared to the old graphics card that I'm currently using and that I'd like to get rid off.


I believe the new Graphics card needs a power connection from the PSU, it's a Asus GeForce GTX 1060 3GB with dual fans, Could I remove any of the below 6-pins and insert them into the new graphics card?



When I try to insert the new GPU, since its larger it cannot fit while the below connector is connected. Does anybody know what it is for, is it essential to be connected with the GPU?



If you've read this far I'm really grateful that you took your time,

Is there anyone that can determain from what I've posted if my new GPU will be able to fit in my PC or should I look for another GPU?

Cheers, dekenz.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Things in a PC aren't connected for no purpose. I wouldn't be comfortable hazarding a guess without a diagram of the motherboard or being hands-on myself.

For fit, you'll have to physically measure and make sure the new card is shorter that that length to the connector.

No, you cannot repurpose other connections to a GPU unless you're interested in frying your components (or worse). If the PSU does not have a proper PCIE connector, then you're limited to GPUs that do not require supplementary power, which basically maxes you out at (most) 1050 Tis, 1650 (non-Super) or RX 6400.

Replacing the PSU will be a hassle because this is a very proprietary PC.

To do much, you'll probably have to invest more money in this and I'm not sure it'll necessarily be to your advantage to swap out a motherboard, PSU, and probably a new case to upgrade the GPU on what is basically a $100 PC. It'll depend on your budget and long-term goals for this machine.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
When I try to insert the new GPU, since its larger it cannot fit while the below connector is connected. Does anybody know what it is for, is it essential to be connected with the GPU?
[image]
That 90 degree angled plug is for the front panel's USB power. When unplugged, the devices you have plugged in the front USB ports won't work, as there's no power.
If you don't use them to begin with, then there's no loss... but if you do, I don't see any extra USB ports on that board. An alternative may be to acquire a USB cable extension, if the mobo has some rear USB ports not in use.
[It looks like there's another USB port to the bottom-left of the cpu cooler, but I'm not 100% it's for USB; if it is, it should have USB printed next to it like the other one does.]


The plug right below that USB is for your storage drive. I do not see any other SATA plugs besides those 3.
Does the SATA that's currently plugged in clear the GTX 1060? You didn't say whether it was ok or not.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Things in a PC aren't connected for no purpose. I wouldn't be comfortable hazarding a guess without a diagram of the motherboard or being hands-on myself.

For fit, you'll have to physically measure and make sure the new card is shorter that that length to the connector.

No, you cannot repurpose other connections to a GPU unless you're interested in frying your components (or worse). If the PSU does not have a proper PCIE connector, then you're limited to GPUs that do not require supplementary power, which basically maxes you out at (most) 1050 Tis, 1650 (non-Super) or RX 6400.

Replacing the PSU will be a hassle because this is a very proprietary PC.

To do much, you'll probably have to invest more money in this and I'm not sure it'll necessarily be to your advantage to swap out a motherboard, PSU, and probably a new case to upgrade the GPU on what is basically a $100 PC. It'll depend on your budget and long-term goals for this machine.
 
May 14, 2022
7
0
10
0
That 90 degree angled plug is for the front panel's USB power. When unplugged, the devices you have plugged in the front USB ports won't work, as there's no power.
If you don't use them to begin with, then there's no loss... but if you do, I don't see any extra USB ports on that board. An alternative may be to acquire a USB cable extension, if the mobo has some rear USB ports not in use.
[It looks like there's another USB port to the bottom-left of the cpu cooler, but I'm not 100% it's for USB; if it is, it should have USB printed next to it like the other one does.]


The plug right below that USB is for your storage drive. I do not see any other SATA plugs besides those 3.
Does the SATA that's currently plugged in clear the GTX 1060? You didn't say whether it was ok or not.
Thank you for the clarification, I've decided to look for a the smaller GTX 1060 that does not require a power connection to the PSU as well.
 
May 14, 2022
7
0
10
0
Things in a PC aren't connected for no purpose. I wouldn't be comfortable hazarding a guess without a diagram of the motherboard or being hands-on myself.

For fit, you'll have to physically measure and make sure the new card is shorter that that length to the connector.

No, you cannot repurpose other connections to a GPU unless you're interested in frying your components (or worse). If the PSU does not have a proper PCIE connector, then you're limited to GPUs that do not require supplementary power, which basically maxes you out at (most) 1050 Tis, 1650 (non-Super) or RX 6400.

Replacing the PSU will be a hassle because this is a very proprietary PC.

To do much, you'll probably have to invest more money in this and I'm not sure it'll necessarily be to your advantage to swap out a motherboard, PSU, and probably a new case to upgrade the GPU on what is basically a $100 PC. It'll depend on your budget and long-term goals for this machine.
Thank you for your reply, I've decided to keep the PSU and look for the smaller 1060 with single fan or even the 1050, one that does not require supplementary power. My main objective for the computer will be running CS:GO.
 
May 14, 2022
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All 1060s require supplementary power. In the 10 series, the 1050 Tis are the most powerful ones to not require supplementary power and a few of the overclocked ones still do.
Thanks for this, I've now upgraded it with a GTX 105 Ti. Without this reminder I might have opted for a 1060 with single fan. The 1050 Ti works great and is running the games I wanted to play smoothly.
 

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