[SOLVED] Trying to Upgrade to a RTX3070

Jul 12, 2021
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I have an i7-3970x on a ASROCK X79 Extreme6 Mobo. I was running an NVIDIA 1070GTX but have decided to upgrade to a RTX3070. I have 2 monitors (Main - ASUS Rog 1440p running @100 Hz & 2nd is a old school 32" Dell 2560x1600 @ 60 Hz). I have the latest MoBo Firmware and have the slot set for PCIE Gen 3 for the RTX. I can see everything boot up fine on the BIOS splash but as soon as the Windows 10 logo comes up...I see green dots pop up on the screen and everything goes dark. I also have the latest NVIDIA driver and everything works fine and boots up once I put the old 1070 back in the PCIE slot. I have also tried doing a fresh install of the NVIDIA drivers but everything behaves the same.

My question is...should my current system be able to handle and RTX3070 (ideally I would like to have both GPUs...one for each monitor)? If not..is there a better MoBo (LGA2011) for the my processor that will actually do PCIE Gen 4?

Thanks ahead of time for any/all input.
 

Eximo

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That CPU pre-dates PCIe 4.0 by a long margin, no motherboards will have that.

My suggestion would be to uninstall the Nvidia drivers in safe mode, don't reinstall anything, shut down, then put the new card in. See if that makes a difference. Windows should be smart enough to handle this, but you can always be surprised.

Rather than forcing a PCIe mode, leave it on auto as well. During the boot process it may want to use a lower PCIe speed, and you forcing it to three makes it unhappy.
 
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Eximo

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That CPU pre-dates PCIe 4.0 by a long margin, no motherboards will have that.

My suggestion would be to uninstall the Nvidia drivers in safe mode, don't reinstall anything, shut down, then put the new card in. See if that makes a difference. Windows should be smart enough to handle this, but you can always be surprised.

Rather than forcing a PCIe mode, leave it on auto as well. During the boot process it may want to use a lower PCIe speed, and you forcing it to three makes it unhappy.
 
Reactions: NitNoidx
Download and run DisplayDriverUninstaller and follow the directions exactly to remove all old drivers in safe mode.

Reboot into Windows and once everything seems to work with the Windows driver, download and install the latest nVidia drivers.
 
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Eximo

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What would you consider the minimal acceptable singlecore performance to run the RTX?
As fast as you are willing to pay for, basically. Unless you are maxing out your graphics settings and then some (Super sampling, RTX on, etc), there will be plenty of game titles where your CPU is the limiting factor.

6 cores twelve threads is 10th and 11th generation i5s. DDR4, NVMe, PCIe 4.0 (11th gen) Not that expensive compared to what a 3970X would have cost back in the day. Ryzen 5600X would be better still, and not too much more. But a contemporary equivalent from Intel (HEDT) won't be available for a while. Getting pretty close to seeing Zen 3 threadripper I imagine, but that is overkill for most people. The 5900x and 5950x certainly fill the niche for high end workstation with gaming.

i7-11700k and up are still fine gaming CPUs, but given the cost, AMD is the better choice there.

Personally I cheaped out on an older i9-10900F, since it was about what I would normally pay for a new CPU and it got me 10 cores. Wasn't really necessary, but it was an interesting upgrade to tide me over until DDR5 is a little more mature than the launch hardware.
 

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