[SOLVED] Turned on my PC, looked like it started up but then turned off and won't turn on again. Please help!

Dec 14, 2019
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I switched on my PC once I'd finished it (first build) and it lit up, fans started spinning etc. it seemed fine. It took me 5/10 seconds to figure out how to turn on my new monitor and by this time the PC was dead. It won't turn back on again. I'm not sure if anything was displayed. I've watched multiple build guides over and over trying to figure out where I've gone wrong but I can't figure it out, please help me!

MPG x570
Ryzen 3700
Gigabyte Nvidia 2070 windforce
2x 8GB Corsair Vengence
Adata XPG SX8200
650w Corsair VS650
NZXT H500 chassis
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Yes you may need an adapter but do so only if you can verify the connections: what is being connected to what via the adapter.

====

I recommend adding 25% more to the calculated wattage.

So your 426 value + 25% is totals to be less than the Corsair's rated 650 watts. Meaning 650 watts should be plenty.

No harm in trying a couple more online calculators to determine if there is a wattage consensus.

Remember if a component has wattage range - use the high end value. If a particular PSU wattage is recommended (GPUs tend towards that) use the recommended PSU wattage. May end up with a much higher value but then you can always go back and look for specific wattage usage. Find a balance.

====

The shop can look at the PSU and the PSU voltages can be tested to some extent.

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test as the PSU is not under load.

See what the shop has to say but be very wary if they claim they can fix the PSU.....

A new PSU with full warranty would be my recommendation.

Or if the current PSU was purchased for your new build, the PSU still may be under warranty.

Return PSU accordingly.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Not sure about "completely dead".

Any beep codes from the motherboard?

Any LED's lit? What colors?

No sudden noises, fan movements, the stoppage?

Doublecheck the applicable User Guides/Manuals for all of your build components and verify that everything is seated and configured accordingly.

My first thought is that the CPU is experiencing a thermal shutdown. How did you apply the thermal paste?
 
Dec 14, 2019
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Not sure about "completely dead".

Any beep codes from the motherboard?

Any LED's lit? What colors?

No sudden noises, fan movements, the stoppage?

Doublecheck the applicable User Guides/Manuals for all of your build components and verify that everything is seated and configured accordingly.

My first thought is that the CPU is experiencing a thermal shutdown. How did you apply the thermal paste?
Thanks for getting back to me so quickly. When you say beep codes is that sound or another kind of signal? At no point has it been both running and plugged in to a display with the correct input selected so I can't verify sound. There are no LEDs other than on the CPU fan, I'm not even sure which colours they are as it came free with the CPU and wasn't detailed when I ordered.

Other than the first time, there have been no sounds or fan movement at all.

The paste came pre-applied on the fan. It did momentarily touch an edge before I realised the paste was on there already so there was a very narrow line through it, but I figured this would be covered when the paste is squashed down.

The only thing I have so far figured I had installed incorrectly is the CPU fan, it has a clasp which needs to be flipped all the way over. I initially feared this amount of pressure would damage the CPU but I have since seen the below video. Could this be the cause of a thermal shutdown and is there any permanent damage from doing this?

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xv89nhFk1vc
1 minute in
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Does not look right to me. Almost as if too much thermal paste was used for the pre-application.

And then if the paste was disturbed prior to the cooler installation the conductivity was likely interrupted.

I.e., the CPU heats up very fast and shuts down almost instantly.

Hopefully the instant shutdown did protect the CPU.

If you are going to reapply thermal paste, be sure to thoroughly clean the old paste off of both surfaces.

You may wish to wait for other comments and suggestions.

As for beep codes: if the motherboard does not have some built in audio, connect a speaker to the applicable audio ports prior to startup and booting.

Post accordingly.
 
Dec 14, 2019
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Does not look right to me. Almost as if too much thermal paste was used for the pre-application.

And then if the paste was disturbed prior to the cooler installation the conductivity was likely interrupted.

I.e., the CPU heats up very fast and shuts down almost instantly.

Hopefully the instant shutdown did protect the CPU.

If you are going to reapply thermal paste, be sure to thoroughly clean the old paste off of both surfaces.

You may wish to wait for other comments and suggestions.

As for beep codes: if the motherboard does not have some built in audio, connect a speaker to the applicable audio ports prior to startup and booting.

Post accordingly.
Thanks again for your advice. I will be trying that once my thermal paste arrives in the post. What's concerning me most is the lack of even an attempt to boot. There's not even a light around the power button (I definitely have the front panel plugged in, bottom right, and snug. This PSU even has all of the FP elements in a single head so I can't have mixed them up). Would this suggest the CPU was fried the first time around?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Hopefully not a fried CPU.

Being a new build any number of things could be source problem; e.g., PSU failure.

On the other hand connections may appear and even feel properly in place they may not actually be so. No one wants to force a connection but first time connections may indeed be quite tight and not fully seated.

There could be bits and pieces of debris interfering. Or just some physically mismatch or misalignment somewhere.

Between a plug and socket for example. Use a bright flashlight to inspect all connections, card seatings, jumpers, cable runs. Carefully plug and unplug a few times - at some point the connection will (should) both appear and feel really in place. Nothing should be forced and if a secure, full connection is not possible then something is wrong.

A magnifying glass can prove very useful for inspection purposes. Even if you have good eyesight.

What you can also do while waiting for the thermal paste is re-read all of the User Guide/Manuals for your build's components. Double check everything you did, all connections, and take a closer look at the fine print. Caveats, warnings, are often overlooked.

Test individual components in a known working system. Drives, GPU, RAM, if at all possible. Objective being to prove if each individual component is working or not working.

Also, "write" your own assembly procedures to ensure that you follow a specific plan. Keep the workspace clean and well-lit. Use the proper tools. Take your time.
 
Dec 14, 2019
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My MOBO front panel pins are in a group of 9 with one gap on the end, am I right to be using the cable with the single head? There's also an adapter with 6 plugs split into 2x2pin + 2x1pin.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Pin counts are not a good way to identify connections. Location and labeling matter.

Without some specific documented instruction stating or showing any given connection - do not plug things in.

When it comes to pins and connections I defer to the applicable motherboard User Guide/Manual. And be sure to read the fine print.

MPG x570

https://download.msi.com/archive/mnu_exe/mb/E7C37v1.1.pdf

However, do indeed verify that I have identified the correct User Guide.

Model and Version numbers matter.

You may referring to JPF1(nine pins, physically numbered Page 33) or JUSB1 (likewise 9 pins, physically numbered Page 36) for example.

Not sure at all about the described 2x2, 2x1 adapter.

You also need to look at the applicable components installation guide. If there is not a matching motherboard connection then you may need an adapter.

If nothing seems to help, then take and post some photographs.
 
Dec 14, 2019
9
0
10
0
Pin counts are not a good way to identify connections. Location and labeling matter.

Without some specific documented instruction stating or showing any given connection - do not plug things in.

When it comes to pins and connections I defer to the applicable motherboard User Guide/Manual. And be sure to read the fine print.

MPG x570

https://download.msi.com/archive/mnu_exe/mb/E7C37v1.1.pdf

However, do indeed verify that I have identified the correct User Guide.

Model and Version numbers matter.

You may referring to JPF1(nine pins, physically numbered Page 33) or JUSB1 (likewise 9 pins, physically numbered Page 36) for example.

Not sure at all about the described 2x2, 2x1 adapter.

You also need to look at the applicable components installation guide. If there is not a matching motherboard connection then you may need an adapter.

If nothing seems to help, then take and post some photographs.
Again, thank you for your really informative responses.

It looks like I do need to use the adapter, although from my understanding this would only affect if the power button works or not and should not damage any other components, please correct me if I'm wrong.

I've asked a couple of friends who both seem to think it's likely a PSU issue, although based on limited experience. I've used a power calculator and it recommends around 426w (https://outervision.com/b/v7LpDZ).

The one I'm using is 650w (https://www.scan.co.uk/products/650w-corsair-vs650-fully-wired-80plus-white-single-rail-52a-120mm-fan-atx-psu-black) so I assumed it has enough headroom. From your experienced point of view is this likely to be the culprit? I know I've gone cheap on this part, it is only bronze rated. I'm going to take it to a repairs shop to see if it's blown, if it has but it's also not powerful enough I don't want to make the same mistake twice and will upgrade.

Thanks.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Yes you may need an adapter but do so only if you can verify the connections: what is being connected to what via the adapter.

====

I recommend adding 25% more to the calculated wattage.

So your 426 value + 25% is totals to be less than the Corsair's rated 650 watts. Meaning 650 watts should be plenty.

No harm in trying a couple more online calculators to determine if there is a wattage consensus.

Remember if a component has wattage range - use the high end value. If a particular PSU wattage is recommended (GPUs tend towards that) use the recommended PSU wattage. May end up with a much higher value but then you can always go back and look for specific wattage usage. Find a balance.

====

The shop can look at the PSU and the PSU voltages can be tested to some extent.

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test as the PSU is not under load.

See what the shop has to say but be very wary if they claim they can fix the PSU.....

A new PSU with full warranty would be my recommendation.

Or if the current PSU was purchased for your new build, the PSU still may be under warranty.

Return PSU accordingly.
 
Dec 14, 2019
9
0
10
0
Yes you may need an adapter but do so only if you can verify the connections: what is being connected to what via the adapter.

====

I recommend adding 25% more to the calculated wattage.

So your 426 value + 25% is totals to be less than the Corsair's rated 650 watts. Meaning 650 watts should be plenty.

No harm in trying a couple more online calculators to determine if there is a wattage consensus.

Remember if a component has wattage range - use the high end value. If a particular PSU wattage is recommended (GPUs tend towards that) use the recommended PSU wattage. May end up with a much higher value but then you can always go back and look for specific wattage usage. Find a balance.

====

The shop can look at the PSU and the PSU voltages can be tested to some extent.

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

Not a full test as the PSU is not under load.

See what the shop has to say but be very wary if they claim they can fix the PSU.....

A new PSU with full warranty would be my recommendation.

Or if the current PSU was purchased for your new build, the PSU still may be under warranty.

Return PSU accordingly.
Despite the prediction from that website I have just seen the recommendation on the back of my GPU box which recommends 550w, what I thought was a lot of overhead now seems to be toeing the line at best!

To myself, as an amateur, this seems to explain what happened. System fired up and then the fuse went in the PSU which explains why there has been no power since the first momentary signs of life.

One last question for now, if you were in my shoes would you bother testing the PSU I've been using or simply write it off and upgrade?
 
Dec 14, 2019
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I bought a new PSU (850w, gold rated) and... nothing D:

I've inspected the MOBO with a bright light looking for anything out of the ordinary and found nothing, also tried breadboarding it but literally nothing is happening. No EZ-debug LEDs or anything.

I've found 2 other posts with people having the same issue with the same motherboard (one with wifi and the other without, like mine) so maybe it's an issue with the MOBO. I'll update this thread when I find out more in case there's anyone else looking for the same answer.

On the plus side I know waaaaay more about how a PC works now haha. Always a silver lining.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Troubleshooting seems to be leading towards a motherboard problem.

As for testing the PSU: test both the old and new one.

Reasons: continue the learning experience and make an attempt to determine if that new PSU is defective.

Just as a matter of process to eliminate the PSU(s) as the source problem.
 
Dec 14, 2019
9
0
10
0
Troubleshooting seems to be leading towards a motherboard problem.

As for testing the PSU: test both the old and new one.

Reasons: continue the learning experience and make an attempt to determine if that new PSU is defective.

Just as a matter of process to eliminate the PSU(s) as the source problem.
I think I read about that, shorting the fan in the PSU to see if it's working. I'll keep you posted
 

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