[SOLVED] Two Router, One Printer , How to Print

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Feb 18, 2022
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Hi,

In our office, staff must connect to the two different routers. We have one wireless printer, which is connected to one router. This causes problem, because staff members who are not connected to the same router to which the printer is attached, to print something, they have to change the Wifi on their laptops.


Is there a solution to this that would allow users connected to either of the router to be able to print?

Thanks
 

ex_bubblehead

Champion
Moderator
Time for a short lesson:

Routers connect NETWORKS to one another.
Switches connect DEVICES within a network.

Two rooms divided by a single wall does not 2 networks make. You're using the wrong tool for the wrong job here. As indicated above, you should be using an access point to extend a wireless network. And, using consumer gear in an office environment is just asking for trouble.
 
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dmitche31958

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A good question that I don't have an answer for but I'll explain what you are trying to do using other terms. You are trying to create two sub-networks. The printer is on one and the second subnet can't find the first subnet in order to print. I tried this once and it drove me nuts as it worked sometimes but only when I booted the printe for the first time. I believe why that worked is that the printer sent out a packet to notify the network of its presence using a mask of 255.255.255.255, or something like that. It has been over two decades since I last did networking. It sent out a broadcast to that happened to go out to all subnets.
I'm also curious of a solution, if there is one. I had thought this over and thought that this was not going to be possible, if for no other reason that the printer will only announce itself on the local network (subnet 1) and PCs on the other network (subnet 2) won't see any of this. I tried using IP addresses to point the printer (subnet 1) from PCs on subnet 2 but other than what I mentioned above it only worked when I first booted the printer.

Can I assume that you have the second router for extending coverage? If that is the case then the better solution would be to set up a mesh network.
If the reason for the second router is to hide traffic between the networks then it is doing its job. :) In the old days when TCP/IP first came into usage in offices, routers were used to keep local traffic off of the backbone as Novell's IPX networking caused a lot of chatter that flooded the network hurting performance. Of course, back then 10mbps was fast. :)
 
Feb 18, 2022
3
0
10
0
A good question that I don't have an answer for but I'll explain what you are trying to do using other terms. You are trying to create two sub-networks. The printer is on one and the second subnet can't find the first subnet in order to print. I tried this once and it drove me nuts as it worked sometimes but only when I booted the printe for the first time. I believe why that worked is that the printer sent out a packet to notify the network of its presence using a mask of 255.255.255.255, or something like that. It has been over two decades since I last did networking. It sent out a broadcast to that happened to go out to all subnets.
I'm also curious of a solution, if there is one. I had thought this over and thought that this was not going to be possible, if for no other reason that the printer will only announce itself on the local network (subnet 1) and PCs on the other network (subnet 2) won't see any of this. I tried using IP addresses to point the printer (subnet 1) from PCs on subnet 2 but other than what I mentioned above it only worked when I first booted the printer.

Can I assume that you have the second router for extending coverage? If that is the case then the better solution would be to set up a mesh network.
If the reason for the second router is to hide traffic between the networks then it is doing its job. :) In the old days when TCP/IP first came into usage in offices, routers were used to keep local traffic off of the backbone as Novell's IPX networking caused a lot of chatter that flooded the network hurting performance. Of course, back then 10mbps was fast. :)

Actually, there is a solid partition in the mid of the office, splitting the office into two halves. So to keep signal strength optimum, we installed two routers.
 

USAFRet

Titan
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Mar 16, 2013
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Actually, there is a solid partition in the mid of the office, splitting the office into two halves. So to keep signal strength optimum, we installed two routers.
So, just an access point, for more WiFi coverage.

This second router should not be doing DHCP duties.

All of that should come from the primary router, and all being in one subnet.
This second router should be dumbed down to be just an access point.

How is it connected to the primary router?
 

ex_bubblehead

Champion
Moderator
Time for a short lesson:

Routers connect NETWORKS to one another.
Switches connect DEVICES within a network.

Two rooms divided by a single wall does not 2 networks make. You're using the wrong tool for the wrong job here. As indicated above, you should be using an access point to extend a wireless network. And, using consumer gear in an office environment is just asking for trouble.
 
Reactions: Krotow
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