[SOLVED] Two SSDs failed within a year. SSD, PSU, or Mobo issue?

boeing186

Honorable
Jan 29, 2014
20
0
10,510
0
A while ago my computer's aux SSD failed and was causing boot errors. The computer wouldn't boot with it, so when I unplugged it and ran the other drives, windows started perfectly. I contacted Samsung for their RMA, got a refurbished 850 EVO 1TB, reinstalled everything, and got it to work for a few months.

This morning, upon attempting to start my computer up again, I had the same issue. I unplugged my RMA'd 850 EVO and my computer booted perfectly again.

I thought the first time around this was caused because I would leave my computer on for a bit, have it hibernate, and then some electrical issue would happen from an improper shutdown or something. However, I have since disabled this feature and made it so my computer is always on. Furthermore, this issue occurred this morning and I properly turned my computer off last night.

So now I'm confused as to whether this is a Samsung issue, my PSU going bad, or my mobo that's broken. I don't want to buy all three just to test.

Specs:
  • Custom-built PC
  • Windows 10 Home, 18363
  • CPU: i7-7700k w/ aftermarket fan
  • GPU: GTX 1080, MSI
  • RAM: 4x16 GB DDR4 2400Mhz Vengeance LPX
  • PSU: Seasonic S12ii bronze 520w
  • Mobo: MSI gaming pro carbon h270
  • Drives:
    • 500GB SanDisk Ultra II (SSD; Working; boot drive)
    • 1TB Seagate Barracuda (HDD; Working; aux drive 1)
    • 1TB Samsung 850 EVO (SSD; FAILED; aux drive 2; refurb'ed from Samsung)
    • 4TB WD (USB HDD; Working; backup)
NOTES:
  • My PSU is about 4-6 years old and is the oldest component in my computer (along with my Seagate HDD)
  • A while ago I checked my temps and they were within the standard range even while gaming
  • Recently my CPU has started to use 100% and has caused some freezes. This only occurs 1-3 times a month around startup and resolves itself after closing all programs and leaving it be for about 2 minutes
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I think the PSU is a very likely suspect.

4-6 years old, low (520) wattage with a hardware configuration that is likely to be rather power hungry at times.

Read the following link from within this Forum:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-psus,4229.html

Run two or three of the calculators to determine what power demands are and could be made.

PSU is a critical component. If the voltages are not correct/out of spec then those components using any applicable voltage could indeed become a problem or have problems.
 
Reactions: boeing186

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I think the PSU is a very likely suspect.

4-6 years old, low (520) wattage with a hardware configuration that is likely to be rather power hungry at times.

Read the following link from within this Forum:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-psus,4229.html

Run two or three of the calculators to determine what power demands are and could be made.

PSU is a critical component. If the voltages are not correct/out of spec then those components using any applicable voltage could indeed become a problem or have problems.
 
Reactions: boeing186

mdd1963

Polypheme
"
So now I'm confused as to whether this is a Samsung issue, my PSU going bad, or my mobo that's broken. I don't want to buy all three just to test.
"

As you need and will be getting a new drive anyway (hopefully covered under warranty?), I'd toss in a new PSU (650 Watt units of semi-decent pedigree are but $65 or so), of course using all the new modular cables that come with it lest you risk frying components by mixing one PSU's cables with another PSU. While there, toss in a new $1 SATA data cable, and connect to a different mainboard port.
 
Reactions: boeing186

boeing186

Honorable
Jan 29, 2014
20
0
10,510
0
I think the PSU is a very likely suspect.

4-6 years old, low (520) wattage with a hardware configuration that is likely to be rather power hungry at times.

PSU is a critical component. If the voltages are not correct/out of spec then those components using any applicable voltage could indeed become a problem or have problems.
As you need and will be getting a new drive anyway (hopefully covered under warranty?), I'd toss in a new PSU (650 Watt units of semi-decent pedigree are but $65 or so), of course using all the new modular cables that come with it lest you risk frying components by mixing one PSU's cables with another PSU. While there, toss in a new $1 SATA data cable, and connect to a different mainboard port.
Thanks. Do you think the PSU created any issues with the mobo? How can I check if there is any damage?
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I will crawl out on the limb and say hopefully no issues.

Generally if a PSU fails in some manner that could cause damage there is likely to be some smoke, odor, sparks, etc..

Not always true so you need to take a closer look at the Motherboard

For the most part just use a bright flashlight to carefully inspect the motherboard for signs of damage: swollen components, black or brown streaks originating from some board component, signs of melting, wires with the insulation drawing back from the connector. A gooey look somewhere on the board or on a component. Discoloration,

You can also use a multi-meter to test PSU voltages. Not a true and full test as the PSU is not under load. However, if one or more voltages are out of spec then the components served by that voltage could have suffered damage that is not visible.

Reference:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-manually-test-a-power-supply-with-a-multimeter-2626158

If you do not have a multi-meter then get a knowledgeable family member or friend to help.

Objective being to eliminate as many possible problems or problem sources as you can.

If nothing is found all could be well. Hard to know for sure being the bottom line.
 
Reactions: boeing186

boeing186

Honorable
Jan 29, 2014
20
0
10,510
0
I will crawl out on the limb and say hopefully no issues.

Generally if a PSU fails in some manner that could cause damage there is likely to be some smoke, odor, sparks, etc..

Not always true so you need to take a closer look at the Motherboard

For the most part just use a bright flashlight to carefully inspect the motherboard for signs of damage: swollen components, black or brown streaks originating from some board component, signs of melting, wires with the insulation drawing back from the connector. A gooey look somewhere on the board or on a component. Discoloration,
Thank you very much for your help, I hope my mobo's still good
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY