Two Zalman CPU Coolers Pick Up CES 2013 Awards

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A Bad Day

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The passive heatsink looks like it could snap the motherboard and tear out the socket if someone bumped or carried the desktop case the wrong way...
 

Sakkura

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For overclockers, the FX100-Cube also has an optional fan measuring 92 x 92 x 25(H)-mm, and has a speed of 650 to 1,200 rpm ± 10-percent. Speed adjustment is made via PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) and the overall noise level is 17 to 21 rpm ± 10-percent.
Might want to change that RPM nonsense to dB or dBA.
 
The closed loop liquid looks big because of the integrated fan. Those worried about the fan... Had their similar air cooler for 4 years no issues. Its in a box to be reused on another build.

The cube HAS to be massive as its passive, and only rated for 77W. Which is HORRIBLE.

The closed loop looks very zalman. The cube... does not. Disappointed in them
 
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A Bad Day

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[citation][nom]unksol[/nom]The cube HAS to be massive as its passive, and only rated for 77W. Which is HORRIBLE.The closed loop looks very zalman. The cube... does not. Disappointed in them[/citation]

I've seen passive heatsinks that could do better than that, especially the extremely rare ones that are completely made of copper.
 



Good ole toms typo-ed it, should be dBA. I did check specs and replacing rpm with dBA all is right in the world.
 

A Bad Day

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[citation][nom]hitman400[/nom]Can anyone explain closed-loop liquid coolers? How does this work? Do you have to change the liquid in it and if yes, how?[/citation]

Closed-loop liquid coolers are pre-fabricated water cooling systems. There's no need to change the liquid, though should they ever leak (unlikely depending on the build quality), your best bet is to RMA or replace it.

I would only recommend them if you're concerned about breaking your motherboard from the weight of big air coolers, or if your case is too small for the big air coolers.
 

swordrage

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[citation][nom]hitman400[/nom]Can anyone explain closed-loop liquid coolers? How does this work? Do you have to change the liquid in it and if yes, how?[/citation]

No, you don't have to change the liquid. they are filled with highly purified water or some other coolant. They require less maintenance than open loop ones.
And about the principle, it's all over the internet.
 

pocketdrummer

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I can't be the only one here that realizes the closed loop cooler will be blowing hot air all around the inside of the case. It's mounted to the back, but the sides are open. Where do you think that air is going to go?
 

JonnyDough

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[citation][nom]unksol[/nom]The closed loop liquid looks big because of the integrated fan. Those worried about the fan... Had their similar air cooler for 4 years no issues. Its in a box to be reused on another build.The cube HAS to be massive as its passive, and only rated for 77W. Which is HORRIBLE.The closed loop looks very zalman. The cube... does not. Disappointed in them[/citation]

Why is 77w horrible? You realize that CPUs are only being made more power efficient and smaller these days...not bigger and more power hungry. We've reached the point where all workstation and home computers are powerful enough. Now manufacturers are focusing on lowering the TDP. So 77w will soon be less. Zalman and all of the other cooler makers are realizing that overclocking is dying, and so are the days of huge heatsinks and computer chips hot enough to fry eggs on.
 

JonnyDough

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[citation][nom]swordrage[/nom]No, you don't have to change the liquid. they are filled with highly purified water or some other coolant. They require less maintenance than open loop ones.And about the principle, it's all over the internet.[/citation]

After a time, yes. You would have to change the liquid. But distilled water/coolant lacks minerals to grind the inside of the system down (its like gently sandblasting paint off a wall). Over time, parts of the metal will end up in the water and help to erode more metal. So, if the system runs long enough it will become very contaminated with metal specs and the coolant will have to be replaced. Just like in a car, if you don't change your coolant every few years your radiator will develop holes and then you will have a costly repair.
 

JonnyDough

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I also don't recommend passive, or water cooled systems for most users. The simplest solution is usually best, but its good to have a quiet fan moving some air over your CPU cooler. In the case of the passive cooler, a case fan blowing air into your case and over your passive CPU cooler would be sufficient for most of the mid and lower end i3/i5 CPUs.
 
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